proceed / move forward

epistolario

Senior Member
Tagalog
I understand that proceed and move forward are synonyms in some contexts. But I'm not sure if they are interchangeable when talking about a refund or cancellation of service. I'm asking because I would use proceed, but someone used move forward in this context:

1. You initially called a customer service department to request the cancellation of a magazine subscription. A sales agent tried to persuade you not to do it, and the topic was slightly changed. But he realized that he cannot persuade you to continue:

- Shall I proceed with the cancellation of your subscription?
- Shall I move forward with the cancellation of your subscription?

2. Same as number one, except that you are requesting a refund on a monthly insurance plan in your credit card, because it only covers accident and death. And you already have other insurance plans that cover major diseases.

- Shall I proceed with the cancellation of your insurance?
- Shall I move forward with the cancellation of your insurance?
 
  • Glasguensis

    Signal Modulation
    English - Scotland
    "Move forward" is understandable but not idiomatic. You could use "go ahead" if you wanted to avoid "proceed".
     

    lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    As a Brit, I would entirely agree that (of your two examples) "proceed" is the verb one would expect to see used in that sort of context. You either proceed with the transaction or cancel it. But maybe "move forward" is standard usage in American English?
     
    Top