procrastinate

Apophis

Senior Member
Portuguese
Stop procrastinating the delivery of the report your boss requested.

Hello,
What are the most natural English words for "to procrastinate" and "procrastination", please?
Thanks.
 
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  • Apophis

    Senior Member
    Portuguese
    WR provides information only from a dictionary. There are no threads or topics about it.
    The problem with dictionaries is that very few people speak like they teach.
    I'd like to know about the live language, the casual and natural English, the language that is spoken in the streets, please.
    Thanks.
     

    panjandrum

    Occasional Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    I find it very strange to see procrastinate used as a transitive verb.

    I suppose I might say "Stop putting off the delivery ...".
    But I would be much more likely to encourage production of the report in some way - telling people to do what you want them to do is generally more productive than telling them to stop what you don't want them to do.
    So more likely (if I want to use the p word):
    Stop procrastinating. Get on with the report your boss has asked for.
     

    sdgraham

    Senior Member
    USA English
    The reason that there are no topics listed is probably because "procrastinate" and "procrastination" are very common and natural English words for "procrastinate" and "procrastination."

    As a side note, the late Erma Bombeck once wrote in her newspaper column that she was going to write a book on the joys of procrastination - but never got around to it. ;)
     

    JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    WR provides information only from a dictionary. There are no threads or topics about it.
    The problem with dictionaries is that very few people speak like they teach.
    I'd like to know about the live language, the casual and natural English, the language that is spoken in the streets, please.
    Thanks.
    The two example sentences from the WR dictionary are actually quite natural and common. More common than you might expect for such an "odd-looking" word.
    "He did not want to write the letter and procrastinated for days"

    "He procrastinated the matter until it was almost too late"
    I'm with panj that a transitive version sounds weird - the whole point is that one is NOT doing anything when one is procrastinating - so to have an object of non-doing seems a little contradictory. :D
     

    manon33

    Senior Member
    English - England (Yorkshire)
    The latinate word 'procrastinate' is more commonly found in writing than in speech, I'd say. The less formal spoken equivalent is probably 'to put off/to delay (doing something)' as suggested above.
     

    Sowka

    Forera und Moderatorin
    German, Northern Germany
    But its great advantage is its versatility: Someone who procrastinates can be called a procrastinator, which leads to the famous slogan: "Procrastinators of the world, unite! ... Tomorrow" ;)
     
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