profusely/tremendously/greatly

< Previous | Next >

GandalfMB

Senior Member
Bulgarian - Yellow Beach
Hello,
I was told that in this sentence: "I helped him profusely/tremendously/greatly to organize the team." only profusely sounded right. As a learner I am not allowed to disagree or venture an opinion. I wouldn't use the sentence above myself, but I do think that the second/third adverb sound fine. What do you think? I think that I was mislead.

Thank you
 
  • JamesM

    Senior Member
    Of the three choices, "profusely" would be my last choice. :) In fact, it's not a word I would use in that sentence.

    (It's "misled", by the way, not "mislead". It's a common mistake for native speakers as well.)

    The whole sentence is a bit awkward to me. I wouldn't insert an adverb between "helped him to organize the team". If I had to, though, I would choose "greatly" first and "tremendously" second.
     

    GandalfMB

    Senior Member
    Bulgarian - Yellow Beach
    Thank you both. A friend my age (from the UK) had an extremely strong preference for "profuse". I have no idea why. The sentence didn't sound good to me, but that shouldn't matter.
    Nor would I, James, but I am not the author. :) Would the sentence: "I helped profusely to organize the team..." sound any better? I am trying to understand her point of view.

    P.S. Yes, it's "misled". I am sorry. :)
     

    JamesM

    Senior Member
    No, it doesn't make any sense to me ("I helped profusely to...") Profusely to me means "extravagantly, abundantly, excessively" as in "He apologized profusely for his mistake." I can't see how it fits this context and I don't think I've seen "profuse" and "help" together before. "Thank you for your profuse help" would sound extremely strange to me, as if I had helped so much that I was actually a hindrance. It wouldn't even sound like something a native AE speaker would say.

    (Someone will probably now find dozens of examples of it in American English books. :) )

    A plant can have a profusion of blossoms, an artist's work can be profuse, but someone's help being profuse? No, I've never encountered that.
     

    GandalfMB

    Senior Member
    Bulgarian - Yellow Beach
    I can't say that I use profuse/ly often. I can't remember the last time I used it. I think, though, that it is often about quantity/amount. As in: "She apologized profusely.", "He was bleeding profusely.", etc. I can't argue, though. I am never 100% sure.

    Thanks again
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top