Promise that

luoruosi

Senior Member
usa
english - america
I've learned that in Korean, "promise" is "약속하다," but how would i use this in a sentence. Like, "I promise I'll meet you tomorrow". How would I link the two verbs?

Also, is there any pattern for linking verbs in this language? For example, I know "기억나다," is "to remember". So if I were to say, "I'll remember to meet you tomorrow," would I link the two verbs the same way for "I promise..."?
 
  • jrssi

    New Member
    Korean
    Linking two verb has pattern in Korea,, but I'm not sure I can explain clear to you

    In Korean Grammar, it's called '안은문장/안긴문장' Which means linking two or more sentence inside(?).
    1587713536861.png

    There are generally two ways to use two or more verbs in sentence.
    One is using 이어진 문장 which is something like using 그리고/그러나...

    And the other( that you asked) 안은문장
    ( ..can be translated into 'hugging sentence/hugged sentence' ...?? )
    1587712857610.png

    so in this sentence , 안은문장 -> '나는 바란다'
    안긴문장 -> '철수가 병원에 가다'



    I promise I'll meet you tomorrow can be translated in to" 나는 내일 /너를 만나기로/ 약속할께"
    -> 안은문장: : 나는 내일 (missing Object) 약속할께
    ->안긴문장(목적어 / object ) : 너를 만난다


    "I'll remember to meet you tomorrow,"
    나는 /내일 너를 만나는걸/ 기억할께
    안은문장: 나는 (missing Object) 기억할께
    안긴 문장(목적어 / object ):내일 너를 만난다


    안은문장/안긴문장 grammar is one of the toughest, but easiest grammar when you understand it,,
    I didn't explained alot about this grammar, so if you want to know more about it, ask me again
    hope this helped you :D
     

    luoruosi

    Senior Member
    usa
    english - america
    Linking two verb has pattern in Korea,, but I'm not sure I can explain clear to you

    In Korean Grammar, it's called '안은문장/안긴문장' Which means linking two or more sentence inside(?).
    View attachment 40837
    There are generally two ways to use two or more verbs in sentence.
    One is using 이어진 문장 which is something like using 그리고/그러나...

    And the other( that you asked) 안은문장
    ( ..can be translated into 'hugging sentence/hugged sentence' ...?? )
    View attachment 40834
    so in this sentence , 안은문장 -> '나는 바란다'
    안긴문장 -> '철수가 병원에 가다'



    I promise I'll meet you tomorrow can be translated in to" 나는 내일 /너를 만나기로/ 약속할께"
    -> 안은문장: : 나는 내일 (missing Object) 약속할께
    ->안긴문장(목적어 / object ) : 너를 만난다


    "I'll remember to meet you tomorrow,"
    나는 /내일 너를 만나는걸/ 기억할께
    안은문장: 나는 (missing Object) 기억할께
    안긴 문장(목적어 / object ):내일 너를 만난다


    안은문장/안긴문장 grammar is one of the toughest, but easiest grammar when you understand it,,
    I didn't explained alot about this grammar, so if you want to know more about it, ask me again
    hope this helped you :D
    I'm still not understanding. To link "promise" to a verb, you used "기로," then to link "remember to a verb, you used, "는걸". I also know for, "hope," we use "기를". Then for "want," we use, "고" and for "say" and "know," we use, "은다고". It seems like there's so many and there's no way of knowing which to use.
     

    Avant Gardener

    New Member
    English - North America
    In Korean the nuance of promising to do something is typically expressed through a specific verb ending rather than using the word promise (약속) itself. Situationally which verb ending is used will depend on the level of formality, but in general soft promises for less formal situations take the verb ending ㄹ게/ㄹ게요 while more formal promises take the ending 겠어요/겠습니다. For emphasis you can use a word like 꼭, which means "certainly" or "surely."

    So the following phrases, while not a literal translation of "I promise to meet you tomorrow," would be most frequently used in speech:

    내일 꼭 만날게 (to a close friend)
    내일 꼭 만날게요 (to an older friend or slightly more distant acquaintance)
    내일 꼭 만나뵙겠습니다 (extremely formal; addressed to someone like a professor)

    Note that in the final sentence 만나다 becomes the humble verb 만나뵙다, which would be appropriate when speaking to someone more senior in an academic or professional context.

    As to your question about how you know which linking structures go with which verbs, this takes a lifetime to learn. Often there is more than one option and the speaker must decide what is best for the specific situation. With the verb 약속하다 a common linking structure is -겠다고, so the sentence "You promised to meet me" could be translated in an informal or intimate context as "(너는 나를) 만나겠다고 약속했어."

    Hope this helps!

    One addendum: To answer the second part of your question, typically 기억하다 attaches to phrases with -는 것을, also expressible as 는 걸/거. This construction is one of the most common ways to connect phrases and it can also be used with 약속하다. So "내일 만나는 거 기억할게" or "내일 만나는 거 잊지 않을게" is probably one of the best ways to express the literal meaning of "I will remember to meet you tomorrow," although out of context these sentences might sound a little awkward or overly insistent.
     

    luoruosi

    Senior Member
    usa
    english - america
    In Korean the nuance of promising to do something is typically expressed through a specific verb ending rather than using the word promise (약속) itself. Situationally which verb ending is used will depend on the level of formality, but in general soft promises for less formal situations take the verb ending ㄹ게/ㄹ게요 while more formal promises take the ending 겠어요/겠습니다. For emphasis you can use a word like 꼭, which means "certainly" or "surely."

    So the following phrases, while not a literal translation of "I promise to meet you tomorrow," would be most frequently used in speech:

    내일 꼭 만날게 (to a close friend)
    내일 꼭 만날게요 (to an older friend or slightly more distant acquaintance)
    내일 꼭 만나뵙겠습니다 (extremely formal; addressed to someone like a professor)

    Note that in the final sentence 만나다 becomes the humble verb 만나뵙다, which would be appropriate when speaking to someone more senior in an academic or professional context.

    As to your question about how you know which linking structures go with which verbs, this takes a lifetime to learn. Often there is more than one option and the speaker must decide what is best for the specific situation. With the verb 약속하다 a common linking structure is -겠다고, so the sentence "You promised to meet me" could be translated in an informal or intimate context as "(너는 나를) 만나겠다고 약속했어."

    Hope this helps!

    One addendum: To answer the second part of your question, typically 기억하다 attaches to phrases with -는 것을, also expressible as 는 걸/거. This construction is one of the most common ways to connect phrases and it can also be used with 약속하다. So "내일 만나는 거 기억할게" or "내일 만나는 거 잊지 않을게" is probably one of the best ways to express the literal meaning of "I will remember to meet you tomorrow," although out of context these sentences might sound a little awkward or overly insistent.
    I think I finally somewhat understand. For promise, you're using the future tense of the "다고" structure, and "는 거" nominalizes a verb, correct?
     

    Avant Gardener

    New Member
    English - North America
    I think I finally somewhat understand. For promise, you're using the future tense of the "다고" structure, and "는 거" nominalizes a verb, correct?
    That's the essence of it. 는 거 is one way to nominalize a verb but there are a few variations on nominalization in Korean that depend on the meaning and context. Unfortunately there's no way around this stuff beyond straightforward memorization. The link below does a good job explaining the basic variations and the context in which you'll be using each:

    [Grammar] -기, -는 것, -음 : Nominalization

    While this link gives -기로 약속하다 as standard usage, you definitely hear some other patterns attached to 약속하다 in everyday language, such as -ㄹ 약속하다, -자고 약속하다, and the aforementioned -겠다고 약속하다. I've listed these out in the order of what I think are the frequency with which I hear them (-기로 being the most common), but native speakers may have a different impression.

    For a more comprehensive breakdown I recommend Jaehoon Yeon and Ross King's Elementary Korean, which does a pretty good job explaining grammar fundamentals and getting into the weeds with this stuff.
     

    luoruosi

    Senior Member
    usa
    english - america
    That's the essence of it. 는 거 is one way to nominalize a verb but there are a few variations on nominalization in Korean that depend on the meaning and context. Unfortunately there's no way around this stuff beyond straightforward memorization. The link below does a good job explaining the basic variations and the context in which you'll be using each:

    [Grammar] -기, -는 것, -음 : Nominalization

    While this link gives -기로 약속하다 as standard usage, you definitely hear some other patterns attached to 약속하다 in everyday language, such as -ㄹ 약속하다, -자고 약속하다, and the aforementioned -겠다고 약속하다. I've listed these out in the order of what I think are the frequency with which I hear them (-기로 being the most common), but native speakers may have a different impression.

    For a more comprehensive breakdown I recommend Jaehoon Yeon and Ross King's Elementary Korean, which does a pretty good job explaining grammar fundamentals and getting into the weeds with this stuff.
    Thank you so much, this helps a lot
     
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