pronounce: destroy, explore

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stephenlearner

Senior Member
Chinese
Hi,

The dictionaries show that the accent of destroy and explore is on the second syllable.
For destroy, de- is the first syllable and -stroy is the second. ( [dɪ'strɔɪ] )
For explore, ex- is the first syllable, and -plore is the second. ( [ɪk'splɔr] )

But I usually pronounce destroy as [dɪs'trɔɪ], which means that the sound [ s ] moves from the second to the first syllable.
And I pronounce explore as [ɪks'plɔr], which means the same as the one above.

I want to know if you can hear the difference when you pronounce destroy and explore fast the correct way and my way respectively.

I can't hear the difference.

Thank you very much.

(Thank you very much, entangledbank. The strikethrough is gone.:D )
 
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  • entangledbank

    Senior Member
    English - South-East England
    Put a space in the [ s] symbol. :)

    The stops should not be aspirated. They behave as if the syllables begin [str] and [spl]. This is one (rare) instance where the syllable division does make a difference to the pronunciation.
     

    stephenlearner

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    Oh, I see. Thank you, entangledbank.

    But even though I used to move the sound [ s ] from the second to the first syllable, I never got the stops aspirated. That is why I can't hear the difference.
     

    se16teddy

    Senior Member
    English - England
    This is one (rare) instance where the syllable division does make a difference to the pronunciation.
    So is the t always aspirated in Dust Roy? I am not sure it is aspirated here, except in careful pronunciation from literate speakers trying to represent characteristics of the orthography.

    (Roy is a deceased relative whose ashes are preserved in an urn on the mantlepiece. The urn needs dusting occasionally - Dust Roy!)
     
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    dojibear

    Senior Member
    English - Northeast US
    But I usually pronounce destroy as [dɪs'trɔɪ], which means that the sound [ s ] moves from the second to the first syllable.
    And I pronounce explore as [ɪks'plɔr], which means the same as the one above.

    I want to know if you can hear the difference when you pronounce destroy and explore fast the correct way and my way respectively.
    I "cannot hear the difference" because there is no difference. When AE is pronounced fast and correctly, there is no separation between syllables in a word (or even between words). So it does not matter which syllable the consonants are in: do they end one syllable, or start the next syllable? Neither, or both: they are simply in between the vowels.

    Post #2 and #3 discuss a possible exception: that T may be pronounced differently when it begins a stressed syllable.

    As a native speaker, I have no way to separate the 's' from the "tr" in order to make the T aspirated. I can't do it.
     

    Rival

    Senior Member
    English - UK
    So it does not matter which syllable the consonants are in: do they end one syllable, or start the next syllable? Neither, or both: they are simply in between the vowels.
    I am assured (by residents of the place) that a certain State's name is "Wi-sconsin" not "Wis-consin".
    I am happy to believe them, but I am totally unable to hear any difference. ;)
     
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    kentix

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    That one I can hear. But there are many words where it's hard to tell if the consonant ends a syllable or begins a syllable - or is in both syllables.
     
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