Pronunciation: 桔子汁 (transitional -/i/-)

< Previous | Next >

Boyar

Senior Member
Russian
I know that dictionaries give [júzizhī] for 桔子汁 (orange juice). However, when I go through dialogues and other audio exercises, I definitely hear an alien sound inside that word: it is rather [izizhī] or even [juízizhī]. Is it right to assume that the first syllable in 桔子汁 has that [-i-] sound in standard Putonghua?
 
  • M Mira

    Senior Member
    Mandarin
    The "u" in pinyin "ju" is actually a "ü" /y/, but since a true "u" /u/ doesn't appear after a "j" /tɕ/, pinyin rules mandate that the umlauts should be dropped when transcribing it. Since /y/ is just a rounded /i/, maybe that's what you hear?
     

    retrogradedwithwind

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    Can you give a link where I could hear the audio?
    Just as Mira said, ü was writed as u after j, q, x. And no equivalent to ü in English. I have no clue if there is one in Russian.

    Btw, 桔 should be written as 橘 under most circumstances in formal writing. 桔梗is the only unrare exception.
     

    Skatinginbc

    Senior Member
    Mandarin 國語
    柳丁 or 柳橙 "orange", 柳橙汁 "orange juice"
    橘 ju2 "tangerine, mandarin"
    桔 ju2 "kumquat" (< Vietamese cum quat, Cantonese gam gwat), which looks like an orange but much smaller. ==> When I see the character 桔, I envision a smaller version of 橘.
    I definitely hear an alien sound inside that word: it is rather [izizhī] or even [juízizhī].
    The extra you mentioned is not one of the individual phonemes that make up that word, so the answers you'll get from most of the native speakers--whose opinions likely sway toward phonemic awareness--would be "NO". That being said, I think it is possible to have a fleeting, transitional i-like sound as a result of an anticipatory change of the lip position from roundness (y) to unroundness (z).
    So we have:
    Rounded /y/ ==> Fleeting /i/ due to premature movement of the lips preparing for the /z/ sound ==> Unrounded /z/
     
    Last edited:

    yuechu

    Senior Member
    Canada, English
    I often hear an /i/ sound following /y/ in words like this (ju, yu, xu, etc) or in syllables ending in "un" such as xun, yun, etc.
     
    Last edited:

    Boyar

    Senior Member
    Russian
    Ok, thanks to everybody for clearing things up for me regarding that transitional [-i-] sound.
    Sorry, I cannot give any link to the dialogue because it is not online (I have mine on disk).
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top