(pronunciation) asked my friend

EdisonBhola

Senior Member
Korean
Hi all,

I have a question about assimilation involving /t/ changing to /p/ when it is followed by /m/.

My question specifically relates to ‘asked’ followed by a bilabial sound, as in ‘asked my friend’. When /ɑːskt/ is followed by /m/, we have /ɑːskp/ due to assimilation. But then what happens to the /k/ sound? In fluent speech, would /ˈɑːsmaɪ/ be an accurate phonetic transcription of the sound (‘asked my’) actually made by native speakers? And if so, how is it different from the present tense version ‘ask my’?

Many thanks!
 
  • Edinburgher

    Senior Member
    German/English bilingual
    For me, there is no change to /p/. In "asked my" I would be likely to drop the /k/ sound, to give /ˈɑːstmaɪ/.
    With "ask my" there is some kind of stop between the /k/ and the /m/, but with practice they can glide into each other, perhaps with a hint of a schwa between them.
     

    Edinburgher

    Senior Member
    German/English bilingual
    I'd release it, but with very little of anything between the t and the m. Again, perhaps a hint of a schwa. There is no interruption to the flow.
    Think of saying "tomorrow" in a way that lets the first o become unvoiced and almost disappear: "tmorrow".
     

    natkretep

    Moderato con anima (English Only)
    English (Singapore/UK), basic Chinese
    Yes, I am likely to drop the /k/ like Edinburgher to simplify the cluster. My /t/ however is likely to be unreleased (or have no audible release).
     

    EdisonBhola

    Senior Member
    Korean
    So in short, whether to release the /t/ sound in this instance is completely up to the individual, perhaps depending on how rapid the speech is and on personal style. Am I right?
     

    EdisonBhola

    Senior Member
    Korean
    Yes, I am likely to drop the /k/ like Edinburgher to simplify the cluster. My /t/ however is likely to be unreleased (or have no audible release).
    From a purely acoustic point of view, if /t/ is unreleased or has no audible release, wouldn't this sound exactly like /ɑːsmaɪ/, as if the /t/ is completely absent?
     
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