pronunciation: Beloved [bi`lavd] vs [bi`lavid]

Lucretia

Senior Member
Russian
Hello,
I wonder if anyone else besides me was surprised to hear J. Howard say [bi`lavd] in his speech. How should I pronounce beloved (as an adjective)? Could you please tell me some other words with [id] besides learned, three-legged?
Sorry, I didn’t risk using the Phonetic TM.
Thank you.
 
  • Dear Lucretia,

    the correct pronunciation of "beloved" is that you wrote, that is /bi'lavd/. At the same time, "learned" and "three-legged" are pronounced at the same way, that is without let the "e" be heard. Take another word for instance. "talked" is not pronounced with a final /id/ but with something like /kd/. In other cases, like "studied" you pronounce the final "ed" /id/. Unforutnately English has not precise phonetic rules and is full of exceptions. MAny pronounciation need to be learned by heart.
    I hope I clarified a little bit your doubts!

    Chiara
     

    Brioche

    Senior Member
    Australia English
    There are many -ed words in English where the pronuciation depends on the situation.

    I would say, for example, my belovED parents, but This old house was belov'd by many.

    I would say 'Her agED parents were drinking a wine ag'd for at least 10 years and eating an ag'd cheddar."

    Here agED and ag'd actually have different meanings.
     

    Not Logged In

    Banned
    England
    Dear Lucretia,

    the correct pronunciation of "beloved" is that you wrote, that is /bi'lavd/. At the same time, "learned" and "three-legged" are pronounced at the same way, that is without let the "e" be heard. Take another word for instance. "talked" is not pronounced with a final /id/ but with something like /kd/. In other cases, like "studied" you pronounce the final "ed" /id/. Unforutnately English has not precise phonetic rules and is full of exceptions. MAny pronounciation need to be learned by heart.
    I hope I clarified a little bit your doubts!

    Chiara

    I'm sorry you are wrong. It's the opposite. The ed is pronounced.
    be love ed three syllables not two. Same with learned as in the adjective meaning scholarly but not as a verb, so

    "He published a learn ed paper" (2 syllables)
    "He learned a lot" (1 syllable)
     

    konungursvia

    Banned
    Canada (English)
    I disagree with Chiara. All three are fixed expressions dating from Shakespearean times, and can be pronounced with or without the final vowel, but more commonly they are uttered with that vowel pronounced as it was in poetry requiring an additional syllable.
     

    Kenneth Garland

    Senior Member
    UK, English
    Further to what I said in an earlier post about the use of two-syllable 'blessed' in Church, now I come to think of it, the two-syllable version is used as an adjective when addressing or describing people/saints/God, but the one-syllable is the past participle. So, for example:

    "Bless-ed be God" or "All generations shall call me bless-ed" (two syllables)
    "The priest blessed the congregation" (one syllable)
     

    Kenneth Garland

    Senior Member
    UK, English
    Sorry, I was a bit thrown by ffb's reference to "blessed"! This is about belov-ed, isn't it? But the same applies:

    "Dearly belov-ed, we are gathered together..." (3 syllables)
    "Mary Magdalene was beloved of the Lord" (2 syllables)
     
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