pronunciation: clock, walk, talk, sock

heidita

Banned
Germany (German, English, Spanish)
In your opinion : do all these words rhyme with "stalk"?

I was surprised to see this affirmation by a native English speaker:

A clarification: In the United States all the words I cited above rhyme with each other. ...I must insist that the words I cited are pronounced the same way in the U.S.
I claimed: clock =sock walk,talk= stalk (the vowel sound in clock and sock is shorter).
 
  • joannainglesa

    Member
    English, England
    Hi, they certainly don't rhyme when said with a English accent, but I can hear in my head that they might rhyme in a North American accent, but I suppose that depends on the regional accent too - maybe a AE speaker could help us out?
     

    jennball

    Senior Member
    USA English
    In the midwestern U.S., clock, walk and sock rhyme, and talk rhymes with stalk, just as Heidita claimed. In the south, I believe walk is different and rhymes with stalk.
     

    cuchuflete

    Senior Member
    EEUU-inglés
    In my part of the AE speaking world, walk and talk and stalk rhyme. Clock, sock, chock rhyme with one another, but do not rhyme with walk, talk or stalk. The first batch have an 'aw' sound, as in crawl, while the latter group
    have an 'ah' vowel sound, as with top. In the Midwest, they sound pretty much alike.
     

    rodoke

    Senior Member
    en-US; .us
    In my part of the AE speaking world, walk and talk and stalk rhyme. Clock, sock, chock rhyme with one another, but do not rhyme with walk, talk or stalk. The first batch have an 'aw' sound, as in crawl, while the latter group
    have an 'ah' vowel sound, as with top. In the Midwest, they sound pretty much alike.
    I'm from the Midwest, and I've never heard anyone pronounce them differently from you.
     

    cuchuflete

    Senior Member
    EEUU-inglés
    In the midwestern U.S., clock, walk and sock rhyme, and talk rhymes with stalk, just as Heidita claimed. In the south, I believe walk is different and rhymes with stalk.
    I'm from the Midwest, and I've never heard anyone pronounce them differently from you.
    Hmmmm....

    I was born in the Midwest, and have spent more than a little time there. I probably exaggerated by saying that they all sound alike in that region. It might be more accurate to say that the distinctions
    are less marked than in the Northeast. There are, of course, quite a few Midwestern accents...<backpedaling grimace>
     

    evilregis

    Senior Member
    English, Canada
    For me (Southern Ontario, Canada), they all rhyme. Walk, talk, stalk, clock sock chock, stock, chalk, etc.

    But at the same time, I could imagine them sounding different from each other in some other Canadian accents.
     
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