[Pronunciation] consonant-vowel linking

vladv

Senior Member
Russian-Russia
Is it true that this linikng doesn't occur if the vowel is built into an article or prepoisition? The trend didn't catch on immideately- normally is should be consonant vowel linking in (catchon) but the preposition prevents this from happening? Am I mistaken? or I met a famous guy ( again there are all the conditiona for likning but it doens't occur?
 
  • Keith Bradford

    Senior Member
    English (Midlands UK)
    I don't think that linking is a very useful concept, unless it changes the normal pronunciation of a consonant. The fact is that a typical English sentence only makes pauses between words when the punctuation or logic demands it. That is to say, all words are linked: Thetrendidn'tcatchonimmediately.

    We break this pattern when the same vowel occurs in two adjacent words as: There'sno_overallrule and not There'snoverallrule. But this comes so hard to some people that they even interpolate another sound to avoid the silence: There'snowoverallrule.
     

    Uncle Jack

    Senior Member
    British English
    What do you mean by "vowel linking"? Are you talking about attaching the consonant at the end of the preceding syllable to vowel? Doesn't this only happen to a noticeable degree when the vowel is stressed, which prepositions and articles generally aren't? I don't think there is anything significant in prepositions and articles in themselves.
     

    vladv

    Senior Member
    Russian-Russia
    What do you mean by "vowel linking"? Are you talking about attaching the consonant at the end of the preceding syllable to vowel? Doesn't this only happen to a noticeable degree when the vowel is stressed, which prepositions and articles generally aren't? I don't think there is anything significant in prepositions and articles in themselves.
    Thanks. So if the vowel of the next word is not stressed the assimilation doesn't happen? And those words whose vowels are not stressed are always function/grammar words? I gave (no assimilation) up smoking. I meet(no assimlation) a man. <YouTube link removed> but here at 1.47 give and up are joined, I am confused.

    <Sorry, no YouTube links without prior permission from a moderator.>
     
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    Uncle Jack

    Senior Member
    British English
    Well, if that is what you mean, then almost all words are run together, as Keith describes in post #2. I thought you were talking about the shifting of the consonant from one syllable (to which it belongs) to the following syllable (to which it does not). To use the the example in the video:
    He's holding a negg.​
    I think this only happens when the second syllable is stressed.
     

    natkretep

    Moderato con anima (English Only)
    English (Singapore/UK), basic Chinese
    If a word ends with a consonant and the next word starts with a vowel, the run-on is most possible, and especially prominent if the next word is stressed, but I would say even if it isn't it is certainly possible for that consonant to be latched on to the next word.

    For instance, when I say 'set it up', my /t/ sounds are released and aspirated like the /t/ sound at the start of a syllable. Not everyone does it like that.
     

    vladv

    Senior Member
    Russian-Russia
    Well, if that is what you mean, then almost all words are run together, as Keith describes in post #2. I thought you were talking about the shifting of the consonant from one syllable (to which it belongs) to the following syllable (to which it does not). To use the the example in the video:
    He's holding a negg.​
    I think this only happens when the second syllable is stressed.
    So in " he is holding a sophiscticated egg" the joingin won't happen because sophisticated is not the first stressed syllable? There would be pause (a .... sophisticated)
     

    Keith Bradford

    Senior Member
    English (Midlands UK)
    So in " he is holding a sophiscticated egg" the joingin won't happen because sophisticated is not the first stressed syllable? There would be pause (a .... sophisticated)
    I hear no pause there. The pause would come if the second word began with a vowel, which never happens because we don't use "a" before a vowel.

    So let's choose a different word than "a". The elephant, for example. Different speakers use at least three different sounds here: /ði: ʔ'elɪfənt/ /ði:'jelɪfənt/ /ðə ʔelɪfənt/ or in some dialects /'ðelɪfənt/.

    If the two vowels are identical, such as the and away in the phrase "the away game" /ðə/ and /əweɪ/, the vowel of the is altered and we hear /ði:jə'weɪ/. I think very few, naive speakers will try to say /ðə ʔə'weɪ/.
     

    JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    If the two vowels are identical, such as the and away in the phrase "the away game" /ðə/ and /əweɪ/, the vowel of the is altered and we hear /ði:jə'weɪ/. I think very few, naive speakers will try to say /ðə ʔə'weɪ/.
    That is the English I grew up with too, but I do hear " /ðə ʔə'weɪ/." or similar (where the the remains with a schwa before a vowel) quite often. I have not resolved whether it is increasing in popularity or I am just noticing it more. I used to think it was mainly in AE but I now hear it in some BE speakers.

    I would agree that "linking" is not something native speakers are taught or do consciously.
     
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    vladv

    Senior Member
    Russian-Russia
    What do you mean by "vowel linking"? Are you talking about attaching the consonant at the end of the preceding syllable to vowel? Doesn't this only happen to a noticeable degree when the vowel is stressed, which prepositions and articles generally aren't? I don't think there is anything significant in prepositions and articles in themselves.
    Do you agree with this likning?Here are some more examples of consonants linking to vowels:

    At all = “A – tall”

    Speak up = “Spea – kup”

    Right away = “Righ – taway”

    Leave it = “Lea – vit”

    School again = “Schoo – lagain”
     

    Uncle Jack

    Senior Member
    British English
    I'm not so sure. How about "he did an about turn"? /hi: dɪd ə nə'baʊt tɜ:ʳn/
    :thumbsup:
    Do you agree with this likning?Here are some more examples of consonants linking to vowels:

    At all = “A – tall”

    Speak up = “Spea – kup”

    Right away = “Righ – taway”

    Leave it = “Lea – vit”

    School again = “Schoo – lagain”
    I am not nearly so sure about your examples. "All", "up" and "it" are stressed, more or less. I don't really hear the "t" in "right away" migrating to the beginning of "away", nor the "l" in "school" migrating to "again". Yes, the syllables all run into each other in ordinary speech, but I wouldn't be tempted to divide the words up any differently from usual, whereas "a nəbout turn" (it doesn't work so well when written with an "a") seems fine.

    I suppose we only really notice this when deliberately stressing the word: Don't pass me the bacon. I didn't ask for bacon, I asked for a NEGG!

    This sort of thing happens a lot with "an". However, when we want to emphasise a preposition, we (well, I) tend to be very careful not to add anything from the previous word, and usually add a pause before the preposition: I said to put it IN the box.
     

    dojibear

    Senior Member
    US English
    At all = “A – tall”

    Speak up = “Spea – kup”
    I don't agree. "At all" is not pronounced "a - tall". it is pronounced "atall". Similarly "Speak up" in not "spea - kup", it is "speakup". What sound or mouth action are you writing as " - "? Whatever it is, it does not exist in English. In English there is no separation between syllables or between words. We do not move the separation when we link. We don't have any separation.

    That is why "linking" is not taught to students in American schools. We have mandatory English classes every day, every year. But the word "linking" is never mentioned. I only learned this term from foreign adult students of English.
     

    dojibear

    Senior Member
    US English
    I suppose we only really notice this when deliberately stressing the word: Don't pass me the bacon. I didn't ask for bacon, I asked for a NEGG!
    Note: stress is on vowels. I don't know how to stress a consonant. So "a NEGG" and "an EGG" and "an Egg" are identical.
     

    JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    I don't agree. "At all" is not pronounced "a - tall". it is pronounced "atall". Similarly "Speak up" in not "spea - kup", it is "speakup". What sound or mouth action are you writing as " - "? Whatever it is, it does not exist in English. In English there is no separation between syllables or between words. We do not move the separation when we link. We don't have any separation.

    That is why "linking" is not taught to students in American schools. We have mandatory English classes every day, every year. But the word "linking" is never mentioned. I only learned this term from foreign adult students of English.
    :thumbsup:
    That is why "a tall" and "at all" sound the same, because there is no gap in speech.
     
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