pronunciation: emphatic pronouns vs reflexive pronouns

lux86

Member
Polish, Poland
Hello,
I was studying the rules of word accentuation in speech and I came across a rule which says that
1) Emphatic pronouns are stressed as a rule: my'self; your'self; my'own; your'own.

and the othe rule saying:

2) Reflexive pronouns are not stresses: myself, himself, themself, each other.

Aren't those two groups the same? So when do we put stress to them in speech and when not?

Thx!
 
  • bartonig

    Senior Member
    UK English
    lux86 said:
    Hello,
    I was studying the rules of word accentuation in speech and I came across a rule which says that
    1) Emphatic pronouns are stressed as a rule: my'self; your'self; my'own; your'own.

    and the othe rule saying:

    2) Reflexive pronouns are not stresses: myself, himself, themself, each other.

    Aren't those two groups the same? So when do we put stress to them in speech and when not?

    Thx!
    I've never come across this sub-categorisation before. Could you give me examples of myself used as emphatic and reflexive pronouns?
     

    lux86

    Member
    Polish, Poland
    Here is the futher extract from a book:

    6. Emphatic pronouns are always stressed:
    I have 'done it my'self

    10. Reflexive pronouns are not stressed:
    He 'hurt himself
    You 'musn't 'hate each other

    Nota that it's the study of weak forms in spoken English and the rules concern the weak forms.

    Thx!

    Btw. I thing I got the difference:)
     

    bartonig

    Senior Member
    UK English
    lux86 said:
    Here is the futher extract from a book:

    6. Emphatic pronouns are always stressed:
    I have 'done it my'self
    The pronoun myself (which refers to the subject) is not the object of the verb and is movable. For example, "I my'self have done it."

    10. Reflexive pronouns are not stressed:
    He 'hurt himself
    You 'musn't 'hate each other
    The pronoun myself (which refers to the subject) is the object of the verb and is not movable.

    Nota that it's the study of weak forms in spoken English and the rules concern the weak forms.

    Thx!

    Btw. I thing I got the difference:)
    .....................
     

    Outsider

    Senior Member
    Portuguese (Portugal)
    It seems that what's they're saying is that the pronouns "himself", etc., are clitics when they are reflexive, but not when they are emphatic pronouns.
     

    elroy

    Imperfect Mod
    US English, Palestinian Arabic bilingual
    If your question is about stress, emphatic pronouns are stressed whereas reflexive pronouns are usually not stressed (unless you wish to place particular emphasis on them).

    I myself am happy.
    I hurt myself.
    I hurt myself, and not Joe.
     
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