pronunciation: "g" before "i" and "y" [flaggy, soggy, pedagogy]

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eclectic

Member
WU-CHINESE
g before the vowel /i/ or /j/ (IPA), it is a close articulation, like j, as in gin, giddy. I think that's one of English pronunciation principles. However, I am confused by some words: flaggy, soggy, pedagogy.

Are they flaji, soji, pedagoji, or flagi, sogi, pedagogi?
 
  • Sharifa345

    Senior Member
    USA
    US English, DR Spanish
    "Flaggy" is not a word. But if it were, it would be pronounced like "soggy, with a hard "g" sound - as in uGly"

    Double "g" always makes this sound of a hard g.

    Examples: boggle, bigger, piggy, squiggle

    "Pedagogy" would have soft g sound, like j sound for "gin"

    But "giddy" has a hard g sound.
     

    natkretep

    Moderato con anima (English Only)
    English (Singapore/UK), basic Chinese
    English spelling has a long and complicated history, and some of the rules derive from French, but in general <g> before <i> is soft /ʤ/ (as in gist or gin). It can be soft before <e> (gesture, general). To signal hard /g/, <u> can be inserted (guide, guest, guilt). Always a hard /g/ with <gg>, as shown by Sharifa.

    Pedagogy can be with a hard /g/ (ˈpɛdəgɒgi)/ or a soft /ʤ/ (-gɒdʒi).
     

    mplsray

    Senior Member
    English spelling has a long and complicated history, and some of the rules derive from French, but in general <g> before <i> is soft /ʤ/ (as in gist or gin). It can be soft before <e> (gesture, general). To signal hard /g/, <u> can be inserted (guide, guest, guilt). Always a hard /g/ with <gg>, as shown by Sharifa.

    Pedagogy can be with a hard /g/ (ˈpɛdəgɒgi)/ or a soft /ʤ/ (-gɒdʒi).
    The Merriam-Webster Online Dictionary labels the pronunciation with a hard g before the y as "especially British." The American Heritage Dictionary, which gives British variants less often than Merriam-Webster, does not have the hard-g pronunciation at all under its entry pedagogy, nor does the entry in the Webster's New World College Dictionary (published by a company unrelated to Merriam-Webster) on the same page.

    I had never encountered that pronunciation before this thread. It is, in my opinion, best to avoid that pronunciation if attempting to speak American English.
     

    entangledbank

    Senior Member
    English - South-East England
    Words like 'soggy' usually come from a simpler word, here 'sog', which has [g] because it's in final position (not followed by e, i, or y). The [g] sound remains when you add suffixes, even if they begin with those letters: dog ~ doggie, flag ~ flagging, mug ~ mugger.
     
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