pronunciation: Maslow [surname]

  • Matching Mole

    Senior Member
    England, English
    It isn't always possible to predict how a surname will be pronounced, as families with exactly the same name may pronounce the name differently. However, I would say there are two likely pronunciations: Mazz-low or Mass-low (low exactly as in "low prices"). The stress will be on the first syllable almost certainly. Whether the "a" is long or short will depend on regional/class-determined pronunciation of the speaker (not the family, unless of course, they are the speakers!).

    The only way to be sure is to ask a member of the family or someone who knows them.
     

    cuchuflete

    Senior Member
    EEUU-inglés
    Matching Mole's fine explanation holds true for American English as well.

    The most likely pronunciation of the first syllable is mazz [rhymes with jazz], but
    it might be a broader 'a', as in spa or lah, in some circumstances.



    Also, please note a spelling mistake:

    how to prononce this surename

    That should be surname.
     

    Meelosh NS

    New Member
    Serbia, Serbian
    Maslow is probably a surname of Slavic origin. It is written like Маслов in Cyrillic, and then because of the influence of Germany in Eastern Europe the "в" (transliterated "v") has probably changed into "w". German and English have different pronunciations of the letters "v" and "w", but that's another story.

    Another theory goes if the surname is Polish (who are also Slavs). Then it would definitely be originally written with a "w", but it has different pronunciation than that in English.

    By my belief, the surname is pronounced with an "s" from the word "sing" and the "w" is pronounced like "v" in the word "love".
     

    gingee

    New Member
    Czech - Czech republic
    Its pronounced as follows: Ma short as in "mamma" + sl (standard as in slow) + ow which sounds like "off".
     

    WyomingSue

    Senior Member
    English--USA
    If you are referring to the Maslow who developed the hierarchy of needs, the standard psychology or business class pronunciation in the U.S. is Mæzlo ( sorry, I'm trying to copy the phonetic pronunciation from Wikipedia, as I'm not managing the paste function with my phone).
     

    gingee

    New Member
    Czech - Czech republic
    If you are referring to the Maslow who developed the hierarchy of needs, the standard psychology or business class pronunciation in the U.S. is Mæzlo ( sorry, I'm trying to copy the phonetic pronunciation from Wikipedia, as I'm not managing the paste function with my phone).
    Maslow was Polish, not American, therefore you should pronounce his name the way I explained.
     

    JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    He was born in New York. People born in the US are eligible for American citizenship. They often also change the spelling or pronunciation (or both, or it had been changed for them during immigration) to make it easier for the locals to pronounce the way they would if it were English/American. So the pronunciation in the home country is not always the one used in the US.

    Cross posted
     

    Copperknickers

    Senior Member
    Scotland - Scots and English
    He was born in New York. People born in the US are eligible for American citizenship. They often also change the spelling or pronunciation (or both, or it had been changed for them during immigration) to make it easier for the locals to pronounce the way they would if it were English/American. So the pronunciation in the home country is not always the one used in the US.

    Cross posted
    And even sometimes if they are not native Americans/Brits we still use an anglicised pronounciation. Einstein is a good example - we don't pronounce his name in the German way.
     

    JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    And even sometimes if they are not native Americans/Brits we still use an anglicised pronounciation. Einstein is a good example - we don't pronounce his name in the German way.
    You mean we don't put the ch between the s and the t? OK, but we use the German vowels, both rhyming with nine, right? (I always have, at least:))
     

    Copperknickers

    Senior Member
    Scotland - Scots and English
    You mean we don't put the ch between the s and the t? OK, but we use the German vowels, both rhyming with nine, right? (I always have, at least:))
    Right. A small difference but still wrong if we were aspiring to give it the 'correct' pronounciation.
     

    GreenWhiteBlue

    Senior Member
    USA - English
    JulianStuart said:
    He was born in New York. People born in the US are eligible for American citizenship American citizens by birth.
    Also, as Julian noted, it is more common than not for Americans with surnames that originate in Slavic languages to pronounce those names very differently from the way they would have been pronounced in their ancestors' homelands.

    gingee said:
    I meant the name is originally Polish.
    Maslow's parents were Jewish immigrants from Kiev, in what was then Russia. However, in so far as the way an American pronounces his own name, it is utterly and completely irrelevant where one's great-great-great-grandfather was born.

    As a Brooklynite, Maslow would have naturally tended to pronounce his name in the same way his neighbors and schoolteachers would have actually said it upon sight, as "MAZZ-lo". The first syllable has a short "a" and rhymes with "jazz", while the second syllable is said the same way as the English word "low". That Maslow himself pronounced his name with a short "a" in the first syllable has been attested by Hans Baruch, who was Maslow's research assistant in 1942 and 1943.
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top