Pronunciation of neuf (new)

Ljubodrag Gráthas

Senior Member
Serbia Serbian (native), English, Irish (Gaeilge)
One of the great dictionaries on line says:

Prononc. et Orth.: [noef], [noe:v]. Vieilli et région., LAND. 1834, GATTEL 1841 [nø] au masc. plur. et p.anal. au masc. sing. Cette prononc. se maintient devant consonne dans des noms propres du type: Neuf-Brisach [ ], Neufchâteau, Neufchâtel. Variable ou non selon les aut. dans les expr. du type: flambant neuf: une villa flambant neuve, deux lames entrecroisées, l'une ébréchée, l'autre flambant neuf.

I don’t understand the [nø] possibility. Could someone explain how to pronounce this adjective?
 
  • Jean-Michel Carrère

    Senior Member
    French from France
    I for one cannot provide you with a clearer explanation. The only thing I can do for you is translate it into English :

    masculine singular : final consonant sounded f, EXCEPT in place names when neuf is the first term where final consonant is mute
    feminine singular : -ve sounded v
    masculine plural : fs sounded
    feminine plural : same pronunciation as in feminine singular
     

    Whodunit

    Senior Member
    Deutschland ~ Deutsch/Sächsisch
    Ljubodrag Gráthas said:
    I don’t understand the [nø] possibility. Could someone explain how to pronounce this adjective?
    Hm, difficult. Let me see if I understood you correctly:

    [nø] looks like a dialect. You simply pronounce it like neuf without its f and with an opened "oe" --> ø (hard to explain)

    I have no idea if you have [ø] in Serbian, but if you could tell me what other languages you speak, I could try to explain on the basis of those.
     

    Ljubodrag Gráthas

    Senior Member
    Serbia Serbian (native), English, Irish (Gaeilge)
    Whodunit said:
    Hm, difficult. Let me see if I understood you correctly:

    [nø] looks like a dialect. You simply pronounce it like neuf without its f and with an opened "oe" --> ø (hard to explain)

    I have no idea if you have [ø] in Serbian, but if you could tell me what other languages you speak, I could try to explain on the basis of those.
    I can only dare to say that I speak some English and Irish (Gaelic), the rest of my knowledge is only a smattering of a language or two. I could always claim fluency in Croatian and Bosnian… Nevertheless, I don’t need explanation how to pronounce [nø], just WHEN, if any time. And of course, now we have a problem of pronouncing this masculine adjective in plural, neufs.
     

    Jean-Michel Carrère

    Senior Member
    French from France
    WHODUNIT : ( quoting me) "fs is pronounced as [fs]? I don't get that. You mean that you would pronounce "des livres neufs" as "dē livr noefs"???"

    OF COURSE NOT, I AM AWFULLY SORRY FOR THAT.

    it is sounded 'f', of course, as is the masculine singular.

    my bad ...
     

    Whodunit

    Senior Member
    Deutschland ~ Deutsch/Sächsisch
    Ljubodrag Gráthas said:
    I can only dare to say that I speak some English and Irish (Gaelic), the rest of my knowledge is only a smattering of a language or two. I could always claim fluency in Croatian and Bosnian… Nevertheless, I don’t need explanation how to pronounce [nø], just WHEN, if any time. And of course, now we have a problem of pronouncing this masculine adjective in plural, neufs.
    I can just speak for myself. I personally pronounce these veriants as follows:

    neuf - nøf (like the number 9)
    neufs - nøf (same as above)
    neuve - noew
    neuves - noew

    Hope that helps. "nø" sounds like a dialect, but I'm not a native speaker.
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top