Pronunciation of "Rozhdestvenno"

cherine

Moderator
Arabic (Egypt).
Hi, I wonder if any one can help me in re-transliterating this word Rozhdestvenno ?. It's a name of a Russian village. But i can't pronounce it because of all those consecutive consonants. :)
Thanks you
 
  • Jana337

    Senior Member
    čeština
    cherine said:
    Hi, I wonder if any one can help me in re-transliterating this word Rozhdestvenno ?. It's a name of a Russian village. But i can't pronounce it because of all those consecutive consonants. :)
    Thanks you
    مرحبا

    Finally I can repay at least something to my angel! :)

    • the first "o" is pronounced like "a" because it is not stressed
    • "zh" stands for the sound you know from French: Jacques, Genève
    • "d" is softened by the subsequent "e" --> dye. But the "e" is not very clear because this syllable is not stressed
    • "ve" is pronounced like "vye", stress on this syllable
    • both n's are pronounced
    • the final o is again unstressed, therefore not particularly marked
    To sum up: Ra - Ge(nève) - break - dye - stvye - nno

    (I assume, hopefully not wrongly, that the first "e" in Genève is very suppressed. There is no "e" sound in the Russian "zh".)

    I am quite sure, but please wait for our Russian natives. :)

    Jana
     

    Jana337

    Senior Member
    čeština
    MindStorm said:
    Hm.. Rozhdestvenno seems more like an adverb, although there is no sense.. It is about 2n at the end..
    I had the same problem, but then I googled it, and Rozdestvenno turned out to be a permissible spelling of Rozdestveno - here.

    Jana
     

    SASH

    New Member
    English, Russian
    Jana337 said:
    مرحبا

    Finally I can repay at least something to my angel! :)
    • the first "o" is pronounced like "a" because it is not stressed
    • "zh" stands for the sound you know from French: Jacques, Genève
    • "d" is softened by the subsequent "e" --> dye. But the "e" is not very clear because this syllable is not stressed
    • "ve" is pronounced like "vye", stress on this syllable
    • both n's are pronounced
    • the final o is again unstressed, therefore not particularly marked
    To sum up: Ra - Ge(nève) - break - dye - stvye - nno

    (I assume, hopefully not wrongly, that the first "e" in Genève is very suppressed. There is no "e" sound in the Russian "zh".)

    I am quite sure, but please wait for our Russian natives. :)

    Jana

    above is a very detailed answer that's hard to beat :) and to add, the word does sound odd to me! However as Russian is my 1st language after all i'll put in my 2 cents worth: my intuitive guess would be that the stress is on E in the 'dye' part not 'stvye'. so it's more like: ro-jdE-stve-nno. and o also has to be pronounced, however not specifically stressed -agreed with Jana...hope this makes sense. Let me know if you have any questions.
     

    Jana337

    Senior Member
    čeština
    SASH said:
    above is a very detailed answer that's hard to beat :) and to add, the word does sound odd to me! However as Russian is my 1st language after all i'll put in my 2 cents worth: my intuitive guess would be that the stress is on E in the 'dye' part not 'stvye'. so it's more like: ro-jdE-stve-nno. and o also has to be pronounced, however not specifically stressed -agreed with Jana...hope this makes sense. Let me know if you have any questions.
    I will be glad to hear other opinions. I based my guess (that's what it was!) on my Slavic feeling. You might be right as far as the stress is concerned (but I still tend to trust my instinct). But I cannot imagine "de" being red like in "debt". I am almost sure that it has to be soft, "dye" (not like the English word, of course).

    Jana
     

    SASH

    New Member
    English, Russian
    Jana337 said:
    I will be glad to hear other opinions. I based my guess (that's what it was!) on my Slavic feeling. You might be right as far as the stress is concerned (but I still tend to trust my instinct). But I cannot imagine "de" being red like in "debt". I am almost sure that it has to be soft, "dye" (not like the English word, of course).

    Jana

    by all means it's soft, however also stressed ))
     
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