Pronunciation of "s + ch"

< Previous | Next >

alevtinka

Senior Member
Chinese (Mandarin)
I noticed that when the letter "s" plus "ch", the combination makes a "shch"-like sound, instead of "s + ch" that I thought it would be (((

e.g. счёт /shchot/, счастье /shchast'e/ ...
 
  • alevtinka

    Senior Member
    Chinese (Mandarin)
    I'm not sure about it ( I just sense it not being pronounced as "s + ch" way ...

    I can handle the "shch" sound now, by prolonging the "ch" for a little while to get a "shch" effect )
     

    wonlon

    Senior Member
    Chinese - Cantonese
    c+ч is pronounced as /щ/ in some cases (e.g. счёт, счастье)

    In other cases it is pronounced as /cч/ (e.g. считывать, счищать)

    I would look up the pronounciation every time you see a word with c+ч.
    Oh... I used to think that сч is invariably pronounced as /щ/.

    But how do I know, for example, the word считать, one of my dictionary marks /щи/, another (bigger) dictionary does not (it provides for счёт /щё/ though)??

    Oh no....
     
    Last edited:

    wonlon

    Senior Member
    Chinese - Cantonese
    I'm not sure about it ( I just sense it not being pronounced as "s + ch" way ...

    I can handle the "shch" sound now, by prolonging the "ch" for a little while to get a "shch" effect )
    I read some other textbook, it says Щ is pronounced as "[ʃ]."

    RUSSIAN: A Self-Teaching Guide (page 4)

    But the second, the Russian щ, is pronounced as a soft [sh], which corresponds exactly to the English. In the Petersburg pronunciation, however, the letter щ is pronounced with a further articulation as [shch]. This pronunciation is actively discouraged not only by the faculty of the Language Department of Moscow State University but also by teachers of Russian abroad, who find that students have a most difficult time with this letter. The sound itself occurs in English within a word (for instance, question) or between words (fresh cheese) but does not occur in initial position.

    (4 sentences, 94 words; As I know quoting in this length doesn't violate the forum rule, please kindly delete the quote if I am wrong.)

    Well, to correct the book, "question" is pronouned /kwestʃən/, not /ʃtʃ/.
     
    Last edited:

    alevtinka

    Senior Member
    Chinese (Mandarin)
    No... Prolonged ch doesn't equal shch... Why don't you find a video on Youtube, for example? I can send you a link with a personal message, if you like.
    Thank you anyway gvozd ) I don't know how to describe the sense, but if articulation is not stopped after making a "ch", being prolonged for a long enough time, "shch" effect can be felt ) Just like we saying "fresh cheese" )

    I can't describe the process exactly, but believe me I can make that sound )
     

    wonlon

    Senior Member
    Chinese - Cantonese
    I'm not sure about it ( I just sense it not being pronounced as "s + ch" way ...

    I can handle the "shch" sound now, by prolonging the "ch" for a little while to get a "shch" effect )
    If you wish, just take it as a soft "sh", like English, as my quote above says.
     
    Last edited:

    Sobakus

    Senior Member
    No... Prolonged ch doesn't equal shch... Why don't you find a video on Youtube, for example? I can send you a link with a personal message, if you like.
    Prolonged Russian ч without the initial stop is exactly щ. But it doesn't correspond exactly to the English [ʃ], just like the English ch isn't equal to the Russian ч. The Russian sounds are more palatalised - [ɕ].
     

    Maroseika

    Moderator
    Russian
    Oh... I used to think that сч is invariably pronounced as /щ/.

    But how do I know, for example, the word считать, one of my dictionary marks /щи/, another (bigger) dictionary does not (it provides for счёт /щё/ though)??

    Oh no....
    There are two different verbs:
    считать [щи...] - to count
    считать [шчи...] - to compare with, to read data from a device
     

    morzh

    Banned
    USA
    Russian
    There are two different verbs:
    считать [щи...] - to count
    считать [шчи...] - to compare with, to read data from a device
    Они и впрямь разные, но, если первый и вправду "щитать", второй я всегда слышал (и сам произношу) как "счи-".
     

    ahvalj

    Senior Member
    In the Petersburg pronunciation, however, the letter щ is pronounced with a further articulation as [shch]. This pronunciation is actively discouraged not only by the faculty of the Language Department of Moscow State University but also by teachers of Russian abroad, who find that students have a most difficult time with this letter
    It is a myth: in St. Petersburg «щ» is not pronounced as "shch" for more than 100 years. For my 36 years of living in SPB I have never ever heard anybody pronouncing it as "shch", in any word. This statement is another example of the troubles with the secondary literature, where the facts or statements, once having entered the circulation, get their own life and are repeated again and again regardless of the reality.
     
    Last edited:

    ahvalj

    Senior Member
    «Щ» is always pronounced as "ɕ:". «Сч» is pronounced the same when there is no clear morpheme boundary, i. e. when this initial «с» is not realized by the speaker as a part of a prefix («считать, счёт, отсчёт, подсчёт, расчёт, расчёска, счастье»), but it is pronounced as "ɕtɕ" when the prefix is transparent to the speaker («считывать»). Sometimes it may vary in the same words («расчёсывать, исчисление»). In suffixes «сч» and «зч» appear to be always «щ» («песчаный, переносчик, грузчик»).
     
    Last edited:

    Maroseika

    Moderator
    Russian
    Они и впрямь разные, но, если первый и вправду "щитать", второй я всегда слышал (и сам произношу) как "счи-".
    До вчерашнего дня я тоже уверенно бы ответил, что там счи-. Однако в словаре написано шчи-, и если прислушаться, то таки да.
     

    Natalisha

    Senior Member
    Russian
    До вчерашнего дня я тоже уверенно бы ответил, что там счи-. Однако в словаре написано шчи-, и если прислушаться, то таки да.
    Маросейка, в каком словаре? У меня никак неполучается произнести "шчи" в слове "считать", получается произношение с ужасным акцентом. Как могли указать такое произношение в словаре, если звук [ш] относится к непарным твердым согласным?
     

    Maroseika

    Moderator
    Russian
    Cловарь трудностей произношения и ударения в современном русском языке.
    Автор К. С. Горбачевич.

    Cчитать.
    В знач. «вести счёт, производить подсчёты» - произносится [щитать] (несов.).
    В знач. «читая, сличить, проверить какой-либо текст» - произносится [шчитать] (сов.).
     

    Maroseika

    Moderator
    Russian
    Редакторская недоработка. Конечно же, подразумевается «шьчитать».
    Ну да, краткое щ.
    Но вряд ли недоработка, это же не научный словарь, а популярный.
     

    gvozd

    Senior Member
    cчитать.
    В знач. «вести счёт, производить подсчёты» - произносится [щитать] (несов.).
    В знач. «читая, сличить, проверить какой-либо текст» - произносится [шчитать] (сов.).
    Пипец какой-то, у меня скоро раздвоение личности начнется, по мере дальнейшего чтения этого форума. Такое ошчушчение, что я живу не в России, а на Луне.
    P.s. Сей выхлоп не есть призыв к дальнейшему обсуждению:)
     

    Maroseika

    Moderator
    Russian
    Пипец какой-то, у меня скоро раздвоение личности начнется, по мере дальнейшего чтения этого форума. Такое ошчушчение, что я живу не в России, а на Луне.
    P.s. Сей выхлоп не есть призыв к дальнейшему обсуждению:)
    Я тоже люблю узнавать что-то новое.
     

    ahvalj

    Senior Member
    Пипец какой-то, у меня скоро раздвоение личности начнется, по мере дальнейшего чтения этого форума. Такое ошчушчение, что я живу не в России, а на Луне.
    P.s. Сей выхлоп не есть призыв к дальнейшему обсуждению:)
    «Считайте про себя»/«считайте данные с прибора». Первое всегда произносится как «щ», второе — и как «щч», и как «щ».
     

    morzh

    Banned
    USA
    Russian
    По-моему, автор попросту неправ. Я попросту ни разу не слыхал "ш" в считывать, и это при том, что я работал в софтверном Акад. институте, где народ был отовсюду, и слово было крайне популярным - его можно было услышать по несколько раз на дню.
    Причем "с" явно намеренно выделяется.

    Мне кажется, автор написал это, явно не имея достаточного опыта слушания этого слова.
     

    ahvalj

    Senior Member
    ОК, есть три регистра произношения в этом и подобных словах: при самом тщательном действительно можно слышать «сч», при несколько более небрежном будет «щч», и при самом небрежном — просто «щ». Сам я обычно в подобных словах произношу «щч».
     

    morzh

    Banned
    USA
    Russian
    ОК, есть три регистра произношения в этом и подобных словах: при самом тщательном действительно можно слышать «сч», при несколько более небрежном будет «щч», и при самом небрежном — просто «щ». Сам я обычно в подобных словах произношу «щч».
    If you pronounce it as such, you will get the word "считать" in the sense of "to count". It is obvious to everyone here, I think, that "считать" in the sense of "to read (data, text)", from "считывать", pronounced differently. I personally heard it as "с-ч-итать" 100% of the time. And I can honestly claim some quite a copious volume of hearing that, due to my professional life.
     

    ahvalj

    Senior Member
    Кстати, о происхождении петербургского «шч» — как мне эта история представляется. В русском языке от начала письменного периода и до века восемнадцатого «щ» произносился как «шч». Такое произношение до сих пор сохраняется в нормативном украинском (с поправкой на полутвёрдость тамошнего «ч») и нормативном белорусском (с поправкой на полную твёрдость тамошнего «ч»). В последние несколько веков смычка в «ч» в этом сочетании начала понемногу исчезать (ср. обсуждаемый выше аналогичный процесс в новом «сч»), причём, как обычно, не одновременно в разных местностях. В Москве она, очевидно, исчезла раньше, так что ко второй половине xix века, когда отечественные исследователи наконец-то озадачились исследованием родного языка, в Москве в образованных слоях нормой было уже «шьшь», тогда как в Петербурге — всё ещё прежнее «шьч». Так это и вошло в сводки и учебники. Как это обычно бывает с книжной культурой с древнеегипетских времён, написанное зажило своей жизнью, и поколения студентов одно за одним усваивали, что подобное произношение представляет собой одну из особенностей петербургской речи. Между тем, переход «шьч» > «шьшь» к началу двадцатого века добрался и до Петербурга, но, как это водится, остался незамеченным образованческой общественностью. «Если доктор сказал в морг, значит в морг» — какое там наблюдение за живым произношением! Прошло ещё сто лет, и авторы один за другим продолжают переписывать параграфы друг у друга, как будто речь идёт о каких-то невоспроизводимых наблюдениях речи племени в джунглях Амазонки...
     
    Last edited:

    gvozd

    Senior Member
    Так это и вошло в сводки и учебники. Как это обычно бывает с книжной культурой с древнеегипетских времён, написанное зажило своей жизнью, и поколения студентов одно за одним усваивали, что подобное произношение представляет собой одну из особенностей петербургской речи.
    Ага, и в Питере небось по-прежнему говорят русскай, питерскай, московскай, булошная...
     

    ahvalj

    Senior Member
    Ага, и в Питере небось по-прежнему говорят русскай, питерскай, московскай, булошная...
    Это как раз было характерно для Москвы xix века. При этом «ской» — это сохранение древнего произношения («ский» пришло из письменного языка), а «шн», наоборот, новообразование.
     

    Maroseika

    Moderator
    Russian
    Это как раз было характерно для Москвы xix века. При этом «ской» — это сохранение древнего произношения («ский» пришло из письменного языка), а «шн», наоборот, новообразование.
    А театральное -скый?
     

    ahvalj

    Senior Member
    А театральное -скый?
    Это совсем искусственное — видимо, «ской» казалось слишком разговорным. Дело в том, что в русском языке ер никогда в «ы» не переходил, он у нас так и остался гласным заднего ряда и дал в сильной позиции «о», поэтому «-скъи» дало «-скои» и далее «-ской».
     

    morzh

    Banned
    USA
    Russian
    -ской обычно сохранялось там, где ударение на него падало.

    ПсковскОй
    ТверскОй
    МоскОвский
    БарЯтинский
    МилослАвский
     

    ahvalj

    Senior Member
    В народном языке оно сохранялось всегда, просто под церковнославянским влиянием обычно писали «-ый/-ий», поэтому в литературном языке утвердилось именно такое произношение.
     

    ahvalj

    Senior Member
    Это, собственно, та же история, что и с «булочной», «шаганием» итп.: народные (московские, по крайней мере) новообразования «булошная», «шыгать» по мере распространения грамотности были вытеснены прежним произношением, отражённым в традиционном написании.
     

    Maroseika

    Moderator
    Russian
    Это совсем искусственное — видимо, «ской» казалось слишком разговорным. Дело в том, что в русском языке ер никогда в «ы» не переходил, он у нас так и остался гласным заднего ряда и дал в сильной позиции «о», поэтому «-скъи» дало «-скои» и далее «-ской».
    _скый произносится вместо -ский, а не -ской.
     

    ahvalj

    Senior Member
    _скый произносится вместо -ский, а не -ской.
    Да, но это теперешнее «-ский». В русском народном языке (во владимиро-суздальских диалектах) все сильные «ъ» перешли в «о», поэтому, в частности, прежнее «-скъи» дало «-ской». Произносилось это «-ской» по общим правилам и совпадало с омонимичным окончанием в косвенных падежах женского рода («московской боярин», «московской боярыни»). В письменном языке это окончание в основном писалось по церковнославянскому образцу: во всех прочих славянских языках «-ъи» давало «-ый» (с дальнейшим расхождением по языкам), в том числе — в обоих языках, влиявших на русский церковнославянский — в болгарском и в украинском. Со словами на большинство твёрдых согласных проблем не было: «-ый» не настолько отличается от редуцированного звука в безударном «-ой», а вот после «к/г/х» возникали сложности, поскольку в русском после этих согласных «ы» ещё в позднедревнерусский период перешло в «и», что отражается и в русском церковнославянском. Получалось, что народный язык имел «боярской, убогой, тихой», а письменный — «боярский, убогий, тихий», вполне различавшиеся в произношении и согласным, и гласным. Я думаю, что старомосковское «боярскый, убогый, тихый» было некоторым компромиссом в языке образованных людей между обоими вариантами — в повседневной жизни они слышали и говорили «-ой», а формальная речь и письмо требовали «-ий». Кстати, мы тут как-то обсуждали давнее написание «Финской заливъ» — в xviii и xix веках были попытки провести «-ой» и в орфографию.
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top