Pronunciation: parades

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  • bartonig

    Senior Member
    UK English
    /p@"reId/

    Unfortunately this editor does not take an IPA font. @ is a schwa. p@ is like the per at the beginning of perform. reId rhymes with made. The stress is on reId.
     

    judkinsc

    Senior Member
    English, USA
    Note: Bartoniqs is much better technically, but a simple way to get to the pronunciation is:

    pa-raydes.

    The first 'a' is short though. The word has no noticeable break when spoken fluidly.
     

    Nick

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    bartonig said:
    /p@"reId/

    Unfortunately this editor does not take an IPA font. @ is a schwa. p@ is like the per at the beginning of perform. reId rhymes with made. The stress is on reId.
    I pronounce it like the pa in pay or the pu in pug ... not the per in perform.
     

    cuchuflete

    Senior Member
    EEUU-inglés
    I half agree with Nick. I too pronounce the first syllable like the pu in pug or the pu in putter or the bu in butter. The pa of pay has no place for me in the first syllable.

    The second syllable rhymes with, and in fact for me is identical to "raid".
     

    bartonig

    Senior Member
    UK English
    cuchuflete said:
    I half agree with Nick. I too pronounce the first syllable like the pu in pug or the pu in putter or the bu in butter. The pa of pay has no place for me in the first syllable.

    The second syllable rhymes with, and in fact for me is identical to "raid".
    I speak RP which will account for the differences.
     

    alitza

    Senior Member
    Romania, Romanian
    kiisha said:
    Hi,
    how should I pronounce this word:"parades"?????
    thanks a lot
    The word "pronunciate" does not exist, according to the WordReference.com dictionary. The correct form of the verb in this case is "pronounce" and the noun that derives from it is "pronunciation".
    Cheers.
     

    foxfirebrand

    Senior Member
    Southern AE greatly modified by a 1st-generation Scottish-American mother, and growing up abroad.
    There's a growing segment of AE speakers who elide the schwa in words like parade, garage, corral and terrain. I'm talking about the West, and I'm dead serious-- people in my region say prayde, grodge, krell and train. This evolution is much more noticeable in young people, particularly males.

    I'm not just griping in a half-joking way about young people slurring their speech. I believe the language has been changing at an accelerated rate during my lifetime, and the reduction of words like parade to one syllable is only one change among many. I believe people growing up today derive far less of their language from printed sources than we of previous generations did, and I have a good guess that's the cause of these changes.

    The most serious change is a vowel shift I detect more and more clearly, and it's getting so ubiquitous I'm surprised we word-loving types don't fret about it all the time-- instead, it's never mentioned.

    Am I the only one that hears all this talk about sax and frash brath all the time? The short-e sound is becoming indistinguishable from the short-a or Anglo-Saxon æsh sound. How much are you paying for your pat mads? (veterinary prescriptions). I always win at roulatt-- I just bat on the rad all the time.

    Guess I broadened the topic a little, it's one of those things I lose my had ovurr.
    .
     

    Isotta

    Senior Member
    English, Hodgepodge
    And then in Appalachia, you hear every syllable of the word, each drawn out twice as long sometimes into sub-syllables.

    I have heard the pronunciation ffb mentioned, though relatively rarely. Also, those who say things like "prayde" and "train" tend to draw out the "r," I think, so "prrayde" and "trrayn." Vowel instability in English is always surprising. They say you can speak in schwa and be understood for the most part, as long as the consonants and accentuation remain normal.

    Z.
     

    Nick

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    foxfirebrand said:
    There's a growing segment of AE speakers who elide the schwa in words like parade, garage, corral and terrain. I'm talking about the West, and I'm dead serious-- people in my region say prayde, grodge, krell and train. This evolution is much more noticeable in young people, particularly males.

    I'm not just griping in a half-joking way about young people slurring their speech. I believe the language has been changing at an accelerated rate during my lifetime, and the reduction of words like parade to one syllable is only one change among many. I believe people growing up today derive far less of their language from printed sources than we of previous generations did, and I have a good guess that's the cause of these changes.

    The most serious change is a vowel shift I detect more and more clearly, and it's getting so ubiquitous I'm surprised we word-loving types don't fret about it all the time-- instead, it's never mentioned.

    Am I the only one that hears all this talk about sax and frash brath all the time? The short-e sound is becoming indistinguishable from the short-a or Anglo-Saxon æsh sound. How much are you paying for your pat mads? (veterinary prescriptions). I always win at roulatt-- I just bat on the rad all the time.

    Guess I broadened the topic a little, it's one of those things I lose my had ovurr.
    .
    This is very true. I don't think it has to do with age, though. I notice this in my grandmother.
     

    GenJen54

    Senior Member
    USA - English
    foxfirebrand said:
    There's a growing segment of AE speakers who elide the schwa in words like parade, garage, corral and terrain.
    If by "West" you mean "West of the Miss'sippi," then you'd be right.

    The flat "a" vowel shift has yet to make it to the lower midlands (and I personally hope it never does), but the elision of the first syllable in parade, etc. certainly has. Nick is not too far from me to the northwest, so I can safely say that the Southwest is not immune to this elided "r" phenomenon.

    Personally, I still say p3-raids - two syllables, with schwa.
     

    Jhorer Brishti

    Senior Member
    United States/Bangladesh English/Bengali
    In the northeast/Upstate New York none of those drastic changes have taken place and the accent is "general" american. I did notice that here words like length and strength are pronounced with no elisions at all. This is not the case in NYC(where I used to live) where these words would be pronounced as "strenth" and "lenth" respectively. I hate how some people here prefer pronouncing the word "interesting" as a three syllabate=Intuh-Rest-ing.. Apparently this is a speech reform after people see that the word is spelled as above and not as "intresting".
     

    panjandrum

    Lapsed Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    bartonig said:
    /p@"reId/

    Unfortunately this editor does not take an IPA font. @ is a schwa. p@ is like the per at the beginning of perform. reId rhymes with made. The stress is on reId.
    Although I am definitely not RP, I could describe my parade in almost the same terms as bartonig. The difference is in the diphthong in ..rade.. . My version - exaggerated of course - sounds like p@.rayudz (keeping to @=schwa).
     
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