pronunciation -s + you [miss you / likes you]

jakartaman

Senior Member
Korean
Hi :)

Does "-s + you" sound like "shoe" when it is pronounced fast in conversation--for example, "I miss you" or "He likes you"?
 
  • Mahantongo

    Senior Member
    English (U.S.)
    In some accents of English, or in the pronunciation of some speakers (especially those with ill-fitting false teeth :D), perhaps. However, in my own accent, or those with which I am most familiar, no, it doesn't sound like that at all.
     
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    jakartaman

    Senior Member
    Korean
    In some accents of English, or in the pronunciation of some speakers (especially those with ill-fitting false teeth :D), perhaps. However, in my own accent, or those with which I am most amiliar, no, it doesn't sound like that at all.
    Thank you, Mahantongo. :)

    The reason why I'm asking this is when you guys say, "Nice to meet you," most of the time it sounds like "Nice to me chew."

    But in case of "miss you" and "likes you," you would never say "mis shoe" and "like shoe" no matter how fast you say them?
     

    Mahantongo

    Senior Member
    English (U.S.)
    The reason why I'm asking this is when you guys say, ... [etc.]
    "You guys"???????????????:eek:

    I am not sure who among the 400 million native speakers of English are included in that strange "you guys" (which, you should understand, is not a polite way of referring to anyone!), but I can assure you, jakartaman, that all native English speakers do not say everything the same way.
     

    perpend

    Banned
    American English
    Does "-s + you" sound like "shoe" when it is pronounced fast in conversation--for example, "I miss you" or "He likes you"?
    Yes it do, er, does :), in American English.

    There are no shoes involved. ;)

    It really does sound like that sometimes, JK-Man.
     

    boozer

    Senior Member
    Bulgarian
    Hi :)

    Does "-s + you" sound like "shoe" when it is pronounced fast in conversation--for example, "I miss you" or "He likes you"?
    One person who speaks like that is Sean Connery. I do not know whether he always speaks like that because I have not had the chance to converse with him :) but he most definitely did in some of his films...
     

    jarabina

    Senior Member
    English - Scotland
    Sean Connery has very "idiolectic" pronunciation, but there are a number of sound combinations that become 'sh' in some Scottish accents, esp. in fast speech. (E.g r + s and s + y.) It's a feature of own my speech when talking with family and friends but not in more formal situations.
     

    boozer

    Senior Member
    Bulgarian
    Sean Connery has very "idiolectic" pronunciation, but there are a number of sound combinations that become 'sh' in some Scottish accents, esp. in fast speech. (E.g r + s and s + y.) It's a feature of own my speech when talking with family and friends but not in more formal situations.
    Quite frankly, I have never been suspected of speaking Scottish English :) , but I also do that in fast speech. It simply saves time. I think it is certainly not limited to Scottish English and Sean Connery was just an example...
     

    boozer

    Senior Member
    Bulgarian
    "What's the meaning of shit? It's what Sean Connery says to his dog." Note: not "what a Scotsman says to his dog".
    :D I once had an Indian colleague who, unlike Sean Connery, genuinely mixed the 's' and 'sh' sounds and had the tendency to fall asleep in his office, hidden from the cruel world. So we had situations like: Me: Mr...., the locksmith is waiting for you and has been for 3 quarters of an hour. Mr.... : Oh, ish he shtill shitting there? :eek: :D

    This said, I have heard countless numbers of people say 'me chew' instead of 'meet you' in fast connected speech and this is normal assimilation (it is assimilation, isn't it? :confused:) for me. I am so used to it that I hardly notice it, really.
     

    Keith Bradford

    Senior Member
    English (Midlands UK)
    That's right; in fact "why choose" and "white shoes" are known as a limiting pair - the very slight difference between them is important in conveying meaning.

    But the forms without 'T' (which I suppose would be "miss you" and "miss shoe" / "me shoe") aren't nearly so close together because the 'S' is pronounced in a different part of the mouth from 'T', and doesn't usually assimilate with the yod (= the 'Y' sound).
     

    boozer

    Senior Member
    Bulgarian
    That's right; in fact "why choose" and "white shoes" are known as a limiting pair - the very slight difference between them is important in conveying meaning.

    But the forms without 'T' (which I suppose would be "miss you" and "miss shoe" / "me shoe") aren't nearly so close together because the 'S' is pronounced in a different part of the mouth from 'T', and doesn't usually assimilate with the yod (= the 'Y' sound).
    Agreed, 't' and 'd' assimilate with the 'yod' far more often than 's' and 'z', but the latter kind of assimilation also occurs in the right conditions (fast enough speech).
     
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