Pronunciation: saved, received

Solitario

Senior Member
Perú Spanish
I have problems to understand the pronunciation of these words.

saved /seyvt/ or /sāvt/
received /ri-siyvd/ or /rĭ-sēvd/

Are they correct? Why the difference?
 
  • I_like_my_TV

    Senior Member
    Tongan
    They look fine to me, but you have to look at the pronunciation keys from the dictionaries where these symbols come from in order to tell, because different systems may use different symbols to represent the same sounds.
     

    Yôn

    Senior Member
    English
    I am having somewhat of a problem with the ‘t’ sound you use in saved. I have never heard it pronounced this way, but instead as ‘d’. When I see that ‘t’, I think of the d switching sounds, like in burned (bernt).

    Does everyone pronounce saved with the ‘t’ sound at the end? I will have to check my dictionary when I get home.


    Jon
     

    Matching Mole

    Senior Member
    England, English
    I don't pronounce it with a T! Neither do I hear anyone else say it like that (British or American). The endings of saved and received are the same, both ending in D. Granted, the D sound is very close to a T, but not the same. And burnt is spelled with a T, burned is pronounced with a D, just like saved.
     

    AWordLover

    Senior Member
    USA English
    My pronunciaton seems to be influenced by the word that comes next.

    Try saying, "He saved for college." focusing on saying saved for quickly. I realize that most of the time I too just end both words with a d.
     

    Yôn

    Senior Member
    English
    I don't pronounce it with a T! Neither do I hear anyone else say it like that (British or American). The endings of saved and received are the same, both ending in D. Granted, the D sound is very close to a T, but not the same. And burnt is spelled with a T, burned is pronounced with a D, just like saved.
    According to my Encarta dictionary, both burned and burnt are pronounced the same way, (bernt).

    According to the OED, however, you seem right, in which case it should be that it is entirely to the preference of the speaker.

    Jon
     

    JamesM

    Senior Member
    Strange. "The fire burned throughout the night." I would never say "burnt" for "burned" in this sentence. "I got burned; the guy ripped me off." Same here. These are all "d" sounds for me. "The cigarette burned a hole in the carpet."

    Would you pronounce these with "t" sounds, Jon? I wonder if it's regional.

    www.m-w.com also shows both pronunciations for "burned":

    Inflected Form(s): burned /'b&rnd, 'b&rnt /; or burnt /'b&rnt/

    It would never have occurred to me before reading this thread that people would pronounced "burned" the same as "burnt".
     

    Moon Palace

    Senior Member
    French
    Hello,
    from what I recall of my university courses on phonetics, we were taught that simple past verb forms follow a rule for pronunciation which can be summed up this way
    verbs ending with /sh/ or /k/ or /p/ (like wash, work, or stop) give a pronunciation in /t/ in the past;
    verbs ending with /n/ or /r/ or all consonant sounds which are heard (like happen, fill, blur, ...), give a /d/ pronunciation
    verbs ending with /t/ or /d/ (like start or board) give an /id/ pronunciation.
    A few exceptions exist, but the verb burn is not an exception and its two different forms should follow this rule. The differences that seem to exist according to the previous posts may be regional ones rather than due to a real pattern.
    Hope it helps.
     

    newzamt

    Senior Member
    English, USA
    In AE, it got burned (with d sound), so now it is burned (t sound). However, if my friend got sunburned (d sound), he is now sunburned (d sound again). No idea why.
     

    gaer

    Senior Member
    US-English
    In AE, it got burned (with d sound), so now it is burned (t sound). However, if my friend got sunburned (d sound), he is now sunburned (d sound again). No idea why.
    Results 1 - 10 of about 331,000 for "burnt toast".
    Results 1 - 10 of about 14,900 for "burned toast".
    Which do you say? :)

    I would say, in AE:

    In AE, it got burned (with d sound), so now it is burned (with d sound)

    OR

    In AE, it got burned (with d sound), so now it is burnt (with t sound)

    We also have both forms in AE. :)

    Gaer
     

    Yôn

    Senior Member
    English
    Yep, I say bernt in all cases. In fact, I just realized I also say ternt (turned). Unless the word following starts with a ‘d,’ then I might just say tern, and combine the ‘d’ sound with the next word and run them together terndown (turned down). I do not see this as being acceptable in my Encarta dictionary, however :(.

    Now, it could very well be regional. I'm from Minnesota, and about the only thing we're known for here is our funny way of talking.


    Jon
     

    Forero

    Senior Member
    The verb burn has two past participles, the regular one burned, pronounced with a d sound, and the irregular one burnt, pronounced as it is spelled (or spelt). Though some speakers use burnt exclusively, others confine it to use as an adjective.

    In some dialects, however, a t sound is regular after n, even for past tense:

    "Jist as she kicked her heals and turnt to run and hide, they was two great big black things astandin' by her side." From "Little Orphan Annie".
     

    Yôn

    Senior Member
    English
    I think I should make a distinction with the ‘t’ sound I use. It is not like the ‘t’ in teepee, but softer, like the ‘t’ in not, or but.

    As for kicked, I also pronounce that one with the soft ‘t’ sound at the end. However, I do not construct sentences like our little orphan friend there ;), but I'm sure you didn't mean that as an insult. :)


    Jon
     

    GreenWhiteBlue

    Senior Member
    USA - English
    "Little Orphant Annie" (yes, "Orphant") is a well-known poem by the late 19th-C. American popular poet James Whitcomb Riley. Riley was from Indiana, and wrote a number of poems spelled in a way to indicate the pronunciation of the country folks of his home state.

    In addition to the line given above, we also see in that poem the following:
    His Mammy heerd him holler, an' his Daddy heerd him bawl,
    An' when they turn't the kivvers down, he wuzn't there at all!
     

    Forero

    Senior Member
    Indiana? I thought it was Southern. :)

    Anyway, I follow the ed after t or d, d after other voiced, t after other unvoiced rule myself as do most people I know. That is, except in those strange situations where the èd is pronounced as a separate syllable for special purposes (learnèd, blessèd, cursèd, belatedly, supposedly, etc.).

    But I have heard some nt and lt pronunciations somewhere - can't remember where - so I don't doubt that it is an authetic native English pronunciation that has its roots in "antiquity", whatever that means in Anglo-America.
     

    Marty10001

    Senior Member
    Ireland/English
    "Now that I've spent a few minutes muttering to myself saved and received. I think I pronounce saved with a t sound at the end, and received with a d."I'm with AWORDlover - if you repeat "saved" over and over you hear that "t" at the end.
     

    Forero

    Senior Member
    I would like to have y'all (Southern for vosotros) do a little experiment to help me sort out what y'all are hearing:

    Follow the -ed words with a word beginning with a vowel without pausing between the words. Does the "t" sound turn back into a "d" sound or stay a "t"?
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top