pronunciation: science [Ulster accent or northern Hiberno English]

fateh ahmadpanah

Senior Member
Kurdish/Iran
Hi. I was reading the famous novel of Joyce( A portrait of the artist as a young man) and then came across this sentence " It is probably in his character to ask such a question in such a moment in such a tone and to pronounce the word science as a monosyllable". In this sentence, Stephen ( the protagonist) thinks about the ulster pronunciation of science in a question asked by his classmate (Mack Alister). in normal or standard English it is a disyllabic word but how we can pronounce it as a monosyllabic? please explain it with phonetic symbols.
 
  • PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    There are no "official dictionaries" of the English language. Even if there were, it would be unlikely to contain pronunciation guides to every variety, dialect and accent of English.

    The pronunciation cannot be "proven" in any case, as each person will pronounce a word with a slight difference (through, inter alia, physical causes) and even phonetic symbols are not absolute.

    You may wish to search for "Ulster Accent" in Google or Google Scholar.
     

    fateh ahmadpanah

    Senior Member
    Kurdish/Iran
    There are no "official dictionaries" of the English language. Even if there were, it would be unlikely to contain pronunciation guides to every variety, dialect and accent of English.

    The pronunciation cannot be "proven" in any case, as each person will pronounce a word with a slight difference (through, inter alia, physical causes) and even phonetic symbols are not absolute.
    oddly enough I thought dictionaries like LONGMAN and OXFORDARE considered as standard dictionaries and officially valid. Anyway my problem has to do with dialectal usage of a word.
     

    dojibear

    Senior Member
    English (US - northeast)
    oddly enough I thought dictionaries like LONGMAN and OXFORDARE considered as standard dictionaries and officially valid.

    Not wanting to argue, just a short explanation. There is no official "language" authority (like a council) in the US or UK that decides what dictionaries (or words, or grammar) are "valid" or "standard". It simply does not exist. So nothing is "officially valid".

    "Standard" means "most popular", and perhaps also "most trusted". After many years and millions of users, a good dictionary has a good reputation (which it deserves), so people trust it. I assume Longman's and OXFORDARE (?) are reliable reference works.
     
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