pronunciation: "What did Buster do?" [rapid speech]

AntiScam

Senior Member
Arabic
Hello,

There is this quote in Arthur - Season 17, Episode 5: All Thumbs/Kidonia
Francine: You did something to him? He did something to you? He caught you in something? You caught him in something? Aha! What is it? What did Buster do? Come on! I know you wanna tell me.
The character talked fairly fast and the the phrase "What did Buster do" sounded like the first letter "d" was omitted and that the letter "t" sounded like /r/ or like the US sound of "double t" in the word letter.
The question is how do you pronounce the letters in red in the mentioned phrase above?
The previous phrase is totally different from the phrase "What did you do?" which is common and I know how to pronounce already.
 
  • Cenzontle

    Senior Member
    English, U.S.
    "What did Buster do" sounded like the first letter "d" was omitted and that the letter "t" sounded like /r/ or like the US sound of "double t" in the word letter.
    You have described it perfectly.
    Strictly speaking, the IPA symbol [r] that looks like the letter "r" refers to an apical trill (multiple vibrations of the tongue tip).
    In your phrase, we are talking about a flap (single vibration of the tongue).
    The IPA symbol is [ɾ], like an "r" minus the little stub at the upper left. (I have to take a magnifying glass to my computer screen to see the difference.)
    Like RM1(SS), I hear no difference in "What did you do?"
     

    AntiScam

    Senior Member
    Arabic
    Thank you all for helping out.
    As for the other phrase, well, it turned out there are many forms of pronouncing it according to this link on SE. The one in bold is the one I am used to.
    “So what did you dream about?

    A native American speaker, slurring words, would have several pronunciations:

    So, whatcha dream about? [wutcha]

    So, what'dya dream about? [wuttedya or wuddedya]

    So, whadja dream about? [wudja]

    So whadjoo dream about? [wudjoo]
     

    Parla

    Member Emeritus
    English - US
    In writing, there are spaces between words, and each word is clearly spelled out.

    When we're speaking, there are no spaces. Also, some people speak slowly and others speak quickly; there is no set, or standard, pace of speech. Nor are native speakers careful to pronounce each word precisely in casual speech. Thus, "What did you dream about?" may be "Whucha dream about?" or "Whadidya dream about?" (Or any number of other similar sounds.) To a native who is asked the question, it will still mean "What did you dream about?"
     

    dojibear

    Senior Member
    English - Northeast US
    So, what'dya dream about? [wuttedya or wuddedya]

    Note: that consonant replacing the t and d is an unvoiced, non-plosive dental. That puts it in between standard English T (unvoiced plosive) and D (voiced non-plosive). That is why they list both tt and dd in the parentheses. The same sound is in the middle of butter, rudder, beader, beater, feeder and many other words.
     

    AntiScam

    Senior Member
    Arabic
    So, what'dya dream about? [wuttedya or wuddedya]

    Note: that consonant replacing the t and d is an unvoiced, non-plosive dental. That puts it in between standard English T (unvoiced plosive) and D (voiced non-plosive). That is why they list both tt and dd in the parentheses. The same sound is in the middle of butter, rudder, beader, beater, feeder and many other words.
    Thank you very much. That's how I pronounce them or I think I do. However, your comment was informative and clear, and very helpful in learning the lingo of pronunciation. This stuff, however, makes sense for the most part to advanced students only. Others need to listen to more basic stuff.

    So, what'dya dream about? [wuttedya or wuddedya]

    Note: that consonant replacing the t and d is an unvoiced, non-plosive dental. That puts it in between standard English T (unvoiced plosive) and D (voiced non-plosive). That is why they list both tt and dd in the parentheses. The same sound is in the middle of butter, rudder, beader, beater, feeder and many other words.
     

    AntiScam

    Senior Member
    Arabic
    You have described it perfectly.
    Strictly speaking, the IPA symbol [r] that looks like the letter "r" refers to an apical trill (multiple vibrations of the tongue tip).
    In your phrase, we are talking about a flap (single vibration of the tongue).
    The IPA symbol is [ɾ], like an "r" minus the little stub at the upper left. (I have to take a magnifying glass to my computer screen to see the difference.)
    Like RM1(SS), I hear no difference in "What did you do?"
    Thanks Cenzontle for the pronunciation lingo
     

    Cenzontle

    Senior Member
    English, U.S.
    So, what'dya dream about? [wuttedya or wuddedya]
    Note: that consonant replacing the t and d is an unvoiced:confused:, non-plosive dental. That puts it in between standard English T (unvoiced plosive) and D (voiced non-plosive:confused:).
    More "pronunciation lingo": Dojibear, I wonder if by "plosive" you mean aspirated.
    Both /t/ and /d/ (at the beginning of a stressed syllable) are plosives: they momentarily stop the air flow through the mouth.
    The /t/ is voiceless and the /d/ is voiced, I agree.
    Another difference is that the /t/ is aspirated (released with a puff of air), while the /d/ is not.
    The flap in "wha'd'ya know" is not a plosive because it is too brief to cause a buildup of air pressure behind the tongue.
    But it is voiced—the vocal cords continue to vibrate from the vowel before it, through it, and into the vowel that follows.
     
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