prop yourself up on/with

VicNicSor

Banned
Russian
prop yourself up
to hold your body up by leaning against something prop yourself up on/against/with
She propped herself up on one elbow.
Longman dictionary

Describe please what it looks like when you prop yourself up on your elbow and if it differs from to prop yourself up with your elbow.
Thank you.
 
  • VicNicSor

    Banned
    Russian
    Well, a hammer is not part of your body, so the difference between hit it with a hammer and stood on a hammer is clear. But I would say that the woman in the picture props herself on/with one elbow, that is, I see no difference. Another matter is if she propped something else, not herself, then I'd use "with". What do you think...:)
    This woman is propped up on one elbow: http://image.shutterstock.com/display_pic_with_logo/87914/87914,1267134396,13/stock-photo-woman-propped-on-one-elbow-47510353.jpg

    Using your knowledge of English prepositions, what do you think the difference between "on" and "with" is? (Clue: I stood on a hammer; I hit it with a hammer.)
     

    PaulQ

    Banned
    UK
    English - England
    I think you should make your own choice. It should be simple: Russian has the locative (on) and instrument (with) cases, how would you decide?
     

    VicNicSor

    Banned
    Russian
    I think you should make your own choice. It should be simple: Russian has the locative (on) and instrument (with) cases, how would you decide?
    I'm not ready to make a choice, but I'd like to know if they are both ok.:) The woman's body is on her elbow, so she's propping herself up on the elbow. But she also supports herself using her elbow so she's propping herself up with one elbow. Does this work?
     

    PaulQ

    Banned
    UK
    English - England
    He propped himself up on the bed/the door/the lamppost/his elbow/his left knee -> on indicates what the weight of his body is on.

    The preposition "on" combines, and can substitute for, both with (as long as the object is concrete)and against (which is always concrete.)

    He propped himself up with his elbow/his left knee/his crutches -> on indicates what (the instrument in broad terms) he uses to prop himself up with. If it is "with" the subject is usually in some control of the object/thing.

    He propped himself up with the aid of his friends/much effort -> this more abstract use is seen as "with the addition of" and is more adverbial.

    He propped himself up against a wall/lamppost/a nearby tree -> against is more clearly where the propping up is done.
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top