Proper

alibey71

Senior Member
Türkçe
"In Hong Kong, 6 per cent of the territory’s land had been reclaimed as of 2011. Controversial plans are in place to reclaim 1,500 more hectares at twenty-five sites by 2039. As in Singapore, many of Hong Kong’s most famous recent skyscrapers are actually built on manu-factured ground. Across the ex-border in China proper, meanwhile, the massive infrastructural and urban growth along the country’s east coast in the last forty years has involved one of the greatest manu-factures of new land ever seen. In total, this new land amounts to fully 12,000 square kilometres – twelve times the area of the whole of Hong Kong."

What is the meaning of "proper" in this context? Thanks in advance.

The source: Vertical by Stephen Graham
 
  • Uncle Jack

    Senior Member
    British English
    China proper (also Inner China) was a term used by Western writers on the Qing Dynasty to express a distinction between the core and frontier regions of China. There is no fixed extent for China proper, as many administrative, cultural, and linguistic shifts have occurred in Chinese history.
    Beware, that appears to include both Hong Kong and Taiwan in "China Proper", which would clearly not be the case in any modern usage.

    "Proper" when appended to a territory indicates those areas that are a core part of the territory, sharing its distinctive geographical, historical and political features. "France proper" would not, for example, include the Caribbean islands of Guadeloupe, Martinique, Saint-Barthélemy or Saint Martin, even though, politically, these are part of France. They aren't part of France geographically.
     

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    Beware, that appears to include both Hong Kong and Taiwan in "China Proper", which would clearly not be the case in any modern usage.

    "Proper" when appended to a territory indicates those areas that are a core part of the territory, sharing its distinctive geographical, historical and political features. "France proper" would not, for example, include the Caribbean islands of Guadeloupe, Martinique, Saint-Barthélemy or Saint Martin, even though, politically, these are part of France. They aren't part of France geographically.
    Note the map and the Wiki quote I included are from separate sources.

    This is the map from Wiki:
     

    entangledbank

    Senior Member
    English - South-East England
    A modern writer could certainly use 'China proper' to exclude Tibet and Xinjiang, if writing about certain political things, but in the context given it means across the border from Hong Kong: the PRC-law part of China, places like Shenzhen but not Hong Kong or Macao. Whether that also included Tibet is irrelevant to the intended meaning, but in most contexts "China but not Hong Kong or Macao" does include Tibet and the other outer regions.
     

    kentix

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    This sentence is completely wrong. I don't know how it got included.

    "In Hong Kong, 6 per cent of the territory’s land had been reclaimed as of 2011."

    It implies there is 94% left to reclaim, which is also completely wrong.

    Just a warning.
     
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