properties (especially, thermal and electrical)

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marcbatco

Senior Member
Italian-Italy
Hi, I would please ask you which of the following options physical (especially, thermal and electrical) properties/physical properties (especially, thermal and electrical) is correct:
Mike is engaged in the evaluation of the mechanical, corrosion-resistance, and physical (especially, thermal and electrical) properties/physical properties (especially, thermal and electrical)
 
  • manfy

    Senior Member
    German - Austria
    Hmmm ... 'corrosion resistance properties' is fine as a term but it doesn't quite fit into this list. 'Corrosion resistance' in itself is a well-established term as a material property.
    Mike is engaged in the evaluation of corrosion resistance, as well as mechanical and physical properties (especially thermal and electrical characteristics) [of this new material].

    PS: A mechanical property actually is a physical property in the strict sense of the word, but for highlighting purposes you can separate these categories.
     

    marcbatco

    Senior Member
    Italian-Italy
    Hmmm ... 'corrosion resistance properties' is fine as a term but it doesn't quite fit into this list. 'Corrosion resistance' in itself is a well-established term as a material property.
    Mike is engaged in the evaluation of corrosion resistance, as well as mechanical and physical properties (especially thermal and electrical characteristics) [of this new material].

    PS: A mechanical property actually is a physical property in the strict sense of the word, but for highlighting purposes you can separate these categories.
    Thanks, manfy, for your suggestions. Why do you think that corrosion resistance properties doesn't fit into the list?
    If corrosion resistance is removed, could the sentence be rewritten: Mike is engaged in the evaluation of the mechanical and physical properties (especially thermal and electrical characteristics). therefore putting (especially thermal and electrical characteristics) after the term properties?
     
    Last edited:

    manfy

    Senior Member
    German - Austria
    No, you don't need to remove corrosion resistance completely, you just have to rearrange it.
    Your list was "mechanical, corrosion-resistance, and physical properties". So that's "adjective, noun, adjective properties" and this doesn't flow well. The readers mind will jump back and forth because all these words refer to properties.
    That's also the reason why I put "especially thermal and electrical characteristics" as a more detailled description behind "physical properties". If you put it after "physical", some readers might lose the mental connection between the adjectives and the connected noun and they're forced to re-read it to make sense of it.
     

    marcbatco

    Senior Member
    Italian-Italy
    No, you don't need to remove corrosion resistance completely, you just have to rearrange it.
    Your list was "mechanical, corrosion-resistance, and physical properties". So that's "adjective, noun, adjective properties" and this doesn't flow well. The readers mind will jump back and forth because all these words refer to properties.
    That's also the reason why I put "especially thermal and electrical characteristics" as a more detailled description behind "physical properties". If you put it after "physical", some readers might lose the mental connection between the adjectives and the connected noun and they're forced to re-read it to make sense of it.
    Thanks, manfy, for the explanation. Consider that corrosion-resistance is not needed, in that case does the position of especially thermal and electrical characteristics remain the same (that is, the evaluation of the mechanical and physical properties (especially thermal and electrical characteristics).)? I would put the before mechanical and physical properties because it refers to the properties of previously described materials. What do you think?
     

    manfy

    Senior Member
    German - Austria
    Thanks, manfy, for the explanation. Consider that corrosion-resistance is not needed, in that case does the position of especially thermal and electrical characteristics remain the same ?
    Yes, I'd keep it in the same place -- simply because this creates smaller, complete 'units of information' and therefore it's easier and more logical for the reader to digest:
    "Mike is engaged in the evaluation of the mechanical and physical properties (especially thermal and electrical characteristics)."

    You see, "the evaluation of the mechanical and physical properties" is a complete and connected noun phrase and the reader must keep it in memory and process it as one connected unit of information to make sense of it. If you write it as "the evaluation of the mechanical and physical (especially thermal and electrical) properties", this connected noun phrase becomes quite long.
    If this were a simple text with simple words, this might not be a big deal. But this is a highly technical text with specific terminology, so any reader who wants to understand the information in it will already have to do a large amount of mental processing. If you increase that amount by using difficult, albeit correct, grammar, many readers might come to the simple - but for you unwanted - conclusion: "Ey, that's difficult to read. I have no clue what he's trying to say!"

    As a general rule: Try to stick to reasonably short and logically connected units of information within your sentences. Try to avoid overly long noun phrases or sentence brackets. Try to create logically connected paragraphs that allow the reader to stop and think about what he/she just read. Avoid elaborate sentence structures which force the reader to re-read the same sentence - it will create annoyance if it happens too often in the same paper.
     
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