propter

Source: Cosmas of the Prague, Chronica Bohemorum III 49

Licet plura relatu digna eniteant, tamen ea intacta relinquimus propter instantis temporis homines, qui nichil boni ipsi operantes, aliorum benefacta credere audita renuant (accusative with infinitive ?).

It is permitted to brighten many worth things with a recital. However, we abandon those things which are intact by the men of the present times who themselves do nothing good and refuse to believe that they heard the good deeds of other men.

Does this seem correct?
 
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  • Cagey

    post mod (English Only / Latin)
    English - US
    My try:

    It is permitted that many things worth a recital shine forth. However, we leave these things untouched because of [propter] men of the present time, who, doing nothing good themselves, refuse to believe the good deeds of others when they [=men of the present time] hear of them.

    My wording is an effort to make the translation transparent, and is therefore awkward. I am not particularly attached to it. The two significant differences:
    I make plura the subject of eniteant, which is in the subjunctive after licet.
    I take credere as a complementary infinitive after renuant. I take benefacta audita as the object of credere.

    I understand propter as "because of, for the sake of."
     
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    wandle

    Senior Member
    English - British
    I would suggest:

    Although 1 there are more 2 brilliant deeds worth the telling, yet I leave them untouched because of the people of the present day who do nothing good themselves and refuse to believe the good things they hear done by others.

    (1) Licet followed by the subjunctive is often used as a conjunction to mean 'although'.
    (2) The plural of plus (plures, plura) can mean either 'more' or 'very many'. The context will show which is correct.
    I suspect it is 'more', which would imply that the author has already related some brilliant deeds by whoever it was.
     
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    I would suggest:

    Although 1 there are more 2 brilliant deeds worth the telling, yet I leave them untouched because of the people of the present day who do nothing good themselves and refuse to believe the good things they hear done by others.

    (1) Licet followed by the subjunctive is often used as a conjunction to mean 'although'.
    (2) The plural of plus (plures, plura) can mean either 'more' or 'very many'. The context will show which is correct.
    I suspect it is 'more', which would imply that the author has already related some brilliant deeds by whoever it was.
    Then it should be something like this, am I right?

    Although there are more brilliant deeds among his and others brilliant deeds worth the telling, yet I leave them intact on account of the people of the present day who themselves do nothing good and refuse to believe the good things of other people they hear.

    I think this is the whole sentence:

    De cuius et aliis claris actibus, licet plura relatu digna eniteant, tamen ea intacta relinquimus propter instantis temporis homines, qui nichil boni ipsi operantes, aliorum benefacta credere audita renuant.
     
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