proszę was w kurzy? moi beztono?

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anthox

Senior Member
English - Northeast US
Cześć,

Nie mogę odczytać tej części listu, i to dręczy mnie bardzo. Proszę mi pomóc.

Kontekst: "... donoszę ci że doczekałem się córki. A teraz kochana siostro i szwagrze proszę was w kurzy?kurwy? moi beztono? martwy papier."

Mimo że jest napisane "doczekałem się," to dziewczyna, która napisała list (według podpisu).

Odnośny odcinek listu:

letter3.PNG


Dziękuję bardzo.
 
  • marco_2

    Senior Member
    Polish
    I think it is ... proszę was w kumy choć bez ten martwy papier, which means (s)he wants them to be godparents for his / her daughter and, cause (s)he can't invite them in person, (s)he does it by means of the "dead (soulless) paper", i.e. the letter. Kumy is another word for godparents, though in some contexts can also mean "in-laws".
     

    Ben Jamin

    Senior Member
    Polish
    I would like to clarify the usage of kum (male) and kuma (female): the word does not describe the relation between the godparent and godchild, but between the godparent and the parent of the godchild.
    So a godchild would describe its godparents as (ojciec*) chrzestny and (matka*) chrzestna, and a godparent would describe his/her godchild as chrześniak / chrześniaczka. The parents of the child would address the godparents of their child with kumie and kumo (vocative) and the same the other way round.
    It is also important to note that the use of these names has dwindled so much that they can be considered to be obsolete, and has been retained mostly among older land dwellers. Young urban people will mostly don't understand the correct meaning.
    *Optional, and used mostly on formal occasions.
     

    anthox

    Senior Member
    English - Northeast US
    To ma sens, bardzo wam dziękuję!

    Jedne małe pytanie: "Doczekałam się dziecka" = "I have (recently) had a child" (dziecko ostatnio urodzone), a nie "I am/have been expecting a child" (jestem w ciąży, ale dziecko będzie urodzone niedługo)?
     
    Last edited:

    Ben Jamin

    Senior Member
    Polish
    To ma sens, bardzo wam dziękuję!

    Jedne małe pytanie: "Doczekałam się dziecka" = "I have (recently) had a child" (dziecko ostatnio urodzone), a nie "I am/have been expecting a child" (jestem w ciąży, ale dziecko będzie urodzone niedługo)?
    Literally: My waiting for the baby has ended (by birth)/ has been fulfilled.
     

    jasio

    Senior Member
    Jedne małe pytanie: "Doczekałam się dziecka" = "I have (recently) had a child" (dziecko ostatnio urodzone), a nie "I am/have been expecting a child" (jestem w ciąży, ale dziecko będzie urodzone niedługo)?
    Dziecko się już urodziło
    Nawet upatrywałbym tu kontekstu że jest to ich pierwsze dziecko i pani nie zaszła w pierwszym możliwym terminie, lecz mieli problemy z poczęciem.
     

    Tyskie

    New Member
    English (UK)
    I think it is ... proszę was w kumy choć bez ten martwy papier, which means (s)he wants them to be godparents for his / her daughter and, cause (s)he can't invite them in person, (s)he does it by means of the "dead (soulless) paper", i.e. the letter. Kumy is another word for godparents, though in some contexts can also mean "in-laws".
    I would never have guessed that in a million years! I was struggling to read the writer's handwriting and simply couldn't see the words "choć" and "bezten".

    I just wanted to underline the fact that when Janina wrote "bezten", a combination of "bez" and "ten", she meant "przez ten". My grandmother, who was from the Subcarpathian Voivodeship, also used to say "bez" (literally "without") instead of "przez" ("through").
     

    jasio

    Senior Member
    I just wanted to underline the fact that when Janina wrote "bezten", a combination of "bez" and "ten", she meant "przez ten". My grandmother, who was from the Subcarpathian Voivodeship, also used to say "bez" (literally "without") instead of "przez" ("through").
    Actually, it's quite common use of this word in some dialects.
     

    anthox

    Senior Member
    English - Northeast US
    I just wanted to underline the fact that when Janina wrote "bezten", a combination of "bez" and "ten", she meant "przez ten". My grandmother, who was from the Subcarpathian Voivodeship, also used to say "bez" (literally "without") instead of "przez" ("through").
    Actually, it's quite common use of this word in some dialects.
    Thank you both for clarifying that! It's not at all something I would have expected to see as a learner of Polish, but the meaning of "przez ten" certainly fits the context here.
     
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