Proverb: the pot calling the kettle black

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suma

Senior Member
USA
English, USA
Does this sound like any thing familiar?

الرجل يرمي أخاه بالبخل و هو فيه
فلان يدّعي على فلان بالخيانة و هي فيه
 
  • Josh_

    Senior Member
    U.S., English
    Do you mean do they sound like any already established proverbs? If so, they don't as far as I'm aware, but I can kind of see a proverbial element in the second, at least.

    Ancillary Note: Remember that the و is always attached to the following word.
     

    suma

    Senior Member
    USA
    English, USA
    Do you mean do they sound like any already established proverbs? If so, they don't as far as I'm aware, but I can kind of see a proverbial element in the second, at least.

    Ancillary Note: Remember that the و is always attached to the following word.
    So how do you understand it?

    ancillary note: I thought that was an older orthographic contrivance that is little adhere to nowadays?
     

    cherine

    Moderator
    Arabic (Egypt).
    So how do you understand it?
    I understand it as : We blame people or criticise them for things that we do ourselves.
    The man blames another for being a miser, when he himself is one. Or accuse the other of being a traitor when he himself is a traitor.
    ancillary note: I thought that was an older orthographic contrivance that is little adhere to nowadays?
    To my knowledge, most people adhere to this.
     

    Josh_

    Senior Member
    U.S., English
    I understand it as : We blame people or criticise them for things that we do ourselves.
    The man blames another for being a miser, when he himself is one. Or accuse the other of being a traitor when he himself is a traitor.
    Yes, my thoughts exactly.:) That's how I understand it -- it deals with hypocrisy. Compare to the English saying "the pot calling the kettle black" or the Biblical "Why do you see the speck in your neighbor's eye, but do not notice the log in your own eye?"
     

    suma

    Senior Member
    USA
    English, USA
    Compare to the English saying "the pot calling the kettle black"
    Yes that's exactly what I had in mind. Acutually I made this up myself (the Arabic) and wanted to see if it would stike a chord with native speakers as a recognizeable proverb.
     

    Wadi Hanifa

    Senior Member
    Arabic
    Yes that's exactly what I had in mind. Acutually I made this up myself (the Arabic) and wanted to see if it would stike a chord with native speakers as a recognizeable proverb.
    رمتني بدائها و انسلّت
     

    Josh_

    Senior Member
    U.S., English
    Yes that's exactly what I had in mind. Acutually I made this up myself (the Arabic) and wanted to see if it would stike a chord with native speakers as a recognizeable proverb.
    Not bad. That's actually pretty good.

    What did you intend for the first one. I am not sure I understand it.
     

    suma

    Senior Member
    USA
    English, USA
    Not bad. That's actually pretty good.

    What did you intend for the first one. I am not sure I understand it.
    For both I intended "Well that's the pot calling the kettle black", I just figured I'd offer two versions to see which sounded more fluid.

    the first one literally (more or less) goes: "the man calls his brother a cheapskate, when he himself is one"

    the second one goes" "so-and-so accuses the other of deceitfulness when he is deceitful himself."
     

    Wadi Hanifa

    Senior Member
    Arabic
    Is that the actual Arabic proverb? something like "she claims that I'm sick when she's the one with chest pains"
    That's the only one I could think of off the top of my head, but I'm sure there are colloquial proverbs that serve the same meaning.
     

    Josh_

    Senior Member
    U.S., English
    For both I intended "Well that's the pot calling the kettle black", I just figured I'd offer two versions to see which sounded more fluid.

    the first one literally (more or less) goes: "the man calls his brother a cheapskate, when he himself is one"
    Ooh.:) I see. I was reading the verbs as 'threw' (The man threw his brother) and then the rest of the sentence didn't make sense. At first read it didn't even dawn on me that Cherine was translating the first sentence as well as the second. I just thought she was giving another example.
     

    cherine

    Moderator
    Arabic (Egypt).
    Yes that's exactly what I had in mind. Acutually I made this up myself (the Arabic) and wanted to see if it would stike a chord with native speakers as a recognizeable proverb.
    Well, I didn't see them as proverbs. But they made sense.
    Good sentences though :thumbsup:
    Is that the actual Arabic proverb? something like "she claims that I'm sick when she's the one with chest pains"
    I'm not sure I understood it myself, but I don't think انسلت has to do with مرض السُلّ . The verb insalla can mean something like walk away.
    Maybe Wadi Hanifa can explain it to us.


    P.S. My signature نعيب زماننا والعيب فينا has almost the same meaning you're looking for: We blame the destiny for our faults.
     

    ayed

    Senior Member
    Arabic(Saudi)
    In Badawi dialect , there is a proverb said when one blames or accuses other of a thing he himself does or characterized by such a trait:
    يشوف عيب الناس ولا يشوف عيبه
    (He) sees people's fault but doesn't see his .
     

    suma

    Senior Member
    USA
    English, USA
    I'm not sure I understood it myself, but I don't think انسلت has to do with مرض السُلّ . The verb insalla can mean something like walk away.
    Maybe Wadi Hanifa can explain it to us.


    P.S. My signature نعيب زماننا والعيب فينا has almost the same meaning you're looking for: We blame the destiny for our faults.
    the Hans Wehr also gives as a possible meaning "to suffer pulmunory tubercolosis" a breathing/chest ailment. that was the only thing that made sense to me in this proverb.

    Your signature line is a little different in my mind than the proverb in question.
     
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