przymiotnik od zupy

Encolpius

Senior Member
Hungarian
Hello, is there no adjective from zupa in Polish, like e.g.: суповой in Russian? I haven't found any in the dictionary. Thanks.
 
  • crabro

    New Member
    Polish
    Yes, there is no adjective from zupa in Polish. No general word but there is something like "rosołowy" - porcja rosołowa, kurczak rosołowy etc. It's not exactly the same(adjective from zupa) but in my view similar.
     

    Thomas1

    Senior Member
    polszczyzna warszawska
    There is "zupny", but it's quite rare to my experience. We often use phrases like "do zupy", "na zupę", etc.
     

    Encolpius

    Senior Member
    Hungarian
    Fantastic, Thomas.....so, there is also an expression "jestem zupny człowiek"???? Do you use that expression?
     

    Ben Jamin

    Senior Member
    Polish
    There is "zupny", but it's quite rare to my experience. We often use phrases like "do zupy", "na zupę", etc.
    I have never heard or seen that word, but I have heard and read the word zupiasty, meaning having a liquid, but thick consistence.
    By the way, can anyone give an example of any other language that has an adjective like суповой ? I think that it is quite rare.
     

    Thomas1

    Senior Member
    polszczyzna warszawska
    Fantastic, Thomas.....so, there is also an expression "jestem zupny człowiek"???? Do you use that expression?
    I'm not aware of any fixed expressions with this word. However, I think that your wording would be understandable (I assume "jestem zupny człowiek" means "lubię zupy"). Due to the rarity of "zupny", the whole may come off as a bit humorous, though.
    I have never heard or seen that word, but I have heard and read the word zupiasty, meaning having a liquid, but thick consistence.
    By the way, can anyone give an example of any other language that has an adjective like суповой ? I think that it is quite rare.
    "Zupiasty" is, I believe, quite different from "суповой". Offhand, I'd translate it as "souplike".
     
    Last edited:

    Thomas1

    Senior Member
    polszczyzna warszawska
    Actually, I think that it may not be necessarily due to the rare nature of "zupny" that the whole wording comes off as humorous, or at least not entirely. "Jestem kartoflany/rybny/serowy/kiełbasiany/itp." do so likewise, although the adjectives aren't rare. It's just an informal turn of phrase with a delicate humorous ring to it.
     
    Last edited:

    Ben Jamin

    Senior Member
    Polish
    I'm not aware of any fixed expressions with this word. However, I think that your wording would be understandable (I assume "jestem zupny człowiek" means "lubię zupy"). Due to the rarity of "zupny", the whole may come off as a bit humorous, though.
    "Zupiasty" is, I believe, quite different from "суповой". Offhand, I'd translate it as "souplike".
    I dis not equate "zupiasty" and "суповой", it's enough to read my post.

    As for all words derived fro zupa in Polish, they inadvertently make people think of words derived from "dupa", so this is maybe one of the reasons that those words are rare. "Jestem zupiasty" will almost certainly incite people to giggle and think about something entirely else. Besides, this expression will never be understood as "I like soup", but "I have a liquid consequence" (see my post #5).
     
    Last edited:

    Thomas1

    Senior Member
    polszczyzna warszawska
    I dis not equate "zupiasty" and "суповой", it's enough to read my post.
    Sorry if that was the impression. I meant to give another tip explaining its meaning.
    [...] Besides, this expression will never be understood as "I like soup", but "I have a liquid consequence" (see my post #5).
    I, for one, wouldn't be surprised to hear it in an everyday colloquial conversation used this way (especially tongue-in-cheek).
    Co macie(mieliście) dzisiaj na obiad ?
    przez slavko54 » 15 lip 2012, o 00:36
    maksiu73 - ja bardzo lubię kartofelzupa . I jestem zupiasty . Uśmieszek może Cię zmylił. Bo gotowałem sam i .... dla siebie .
    http://www.drugieserce.jaw.pl/forum/co-macie-mieliscie-dzisiaj-na-obiad-t482-90.html



    Mój Bartosz dużo je ,dzisiaj na przykład na sniadanie kanapkę z pasztetem ,później 2 kawałki ciasta ,banan ,2 talerze zupy ,kopiasty talerz kopytek [...] O kurczę stwierdzam ,że on naprawde dużo je [...]
    O a teraz je 3 talerz zupy -ale to ''zupiasty''chłopak jest [...]
    Dorcik2 Tytuł: : śr sty 14, 2009 5:54 pm
    http://www.forum-ciaza.pl/viewtopic.php?f=39&t=28187&start=1065
     
    Last edited:

    Ben Jamin

    Senior Member
    Polish
    Sorry if that was the impression. I meant to give another tip explaining its meaning.

    I, for one, wouldn't be surprised to hear it in an everyday colloquial conversation to be used this way (especially tongue-in-cheek).
    Co macie(mieliście) dzisiaj na obiad ?
    przez slavko54 » 15 lip 2012, o 00:36
    maksiu73 - ja bardzo lubię kartofelzupa . I jestem zupiasty . Uśmieszek może Cię zmylił. Bo gotowałem sam i .... dla siebie .
    http://www.drugieserce.jaw.pl/forum/co-macie-mieliscie-dzisiaj-na-obiad-t482-90.html



    Mój Bartosz dużo je ,dzisiaj na przykład na sniadanie kanapkę z pasztetem ,później 2 kawałki ciasta ,banan ,2 talerze zupy ,kopiasty talerz kopytek [...] O kurczę stwierdzam ,że on naprawde dużo je [...]
    O a teraz je 3 talerz zupy -ale to ''zupiasty''chłopak jest [...]
    Dorcik2 Tytuł: : śr sty 14, 2009 5:54 pm
    http://www.forum-ciaza.pl/viewtopic.php?f=39&t=28187&start=1065
    Now I see how the Polish language drifts away from the form that I am familiar with. I have even heard that dobroduszny became an insult now, and means the same as stupid, while niedźwiedzia przysługa became a positive one (a huge favour).
     

    bibax

    Senior Member
    Czech (Prague)
    By the way, can anyone give an example of any other language that has an adjective like суповой ? I think that it is quite rare.
    In Czech:
    polévkový from polévka = soup;
    polévková lžíce (spoon), polévkové koření (spices), etc.

    "Jsem polévkový" and "jsem knedlíkový" (Pepiczek knedlikowy :))" are quite common sayings in the informal everyday speech.

    I have found (sjp.pl):

    zupny
    przymiotnik od: zupa (np. koncentraty zupne); zupowy (częściej);

    There is also an interesting discussion ("no tak... nikt nie wie co to słowo znaczy ani gdzie występuje ale jest w słowniku...").

    Personally I should guess zupowy as the suffix -owy is very productive in Polish (like in Czech: knedlík - knedlíkový).
     

    marco_2

    Senior Member
    Polish
    I heard the adjectives zupowy, latowy etc. from people coming from Greater Poland (Wielkopolska) but for me they sound strange and I would never use them.
     

    jasio

    Senior Member
    In Czech:
    polévkový from polévka = soup;
    polévková lžíce (spoon), polévkové koření (spices), etc.
    In Polish we would rather say "do zupy". "Łyżka do zupy", "przyprawy do zupy" (are there any special soup spices though?).

    "Jsem polévkový"
    and "jsem knedlíkový" (Pepiczek knedlikowy :))" are quite common sayings in the informal everyday speech.
    And what do they actually mean?

    I have found (sjp.pl):

    zupny
    przymiotnik od: zupa (np. koncentraty zupne); zupowy (częściej);
    As Ben-Jamin has already written, it is too close to 'dupny'.
     

    Thomas1

    Senior Member
    polszczyzna warszawska
    I don't have the anal association with the word "zupny" to tell the truth. Have those who experience it also got one when they hear "zupa"? Seriously.
    [...] the adjectives zupowy, latowy etc. [...] for me they sound strange [...].
    Ditto.

    I have started a thread in the Russian forum asking whether it's possible to say, for instance, "я рыбный" meaning "I like fish". Could Polish native speakers say what they make of the Polish equivalent construction (for example: jestem rybny/kartoflany/serowy/kiełbasiany)? A Russian speaker asked a question about it, but before I give any answer I'd like to know whether my perception of the wording isn't skewed in some way. The question is the following: понятно ли польское выражение вне контекста? (is the Polish expression understandable outside [its usual] context?). My answer to this question would be "yes". I'd also appreciate your remarks on the language register and any possible connotations that you might discern in the construction (I wrote about these in my posts #6&#8).
     
    Last edited:

    bibax

    Senior Member
    Czech (Prague)
    In Polish we would rather say "do zupy". "Łyżka do zupy", "przyprawy do zupy" (are there any special soup spices though?).
    Maggi - tekuté polévkové koření.
    Maggi - aromatyczna przyprawa w płynie, do zup (mostly).
    And what do they actually mean?
    Jsem polévkový. = I like soups. I eat soups very often. I eat soup before every main dish.
    Jsem knedlíkový. = I prefer dumplings to potatoes, rice, pasta, etc.
    Jsem omáčkový (omáčka = sos?, gravy, подливка). = I prefer dishes with gravy, e.g. goulash to fish and chips.
    Jsem knedlíkový a omáčkový. = I prefer, say, Gulasch with Semmelknödel to Wienerschnitzel with Bratkartoffeln (as it is often too dry).

    "My jsme všichni omáčkoví, takže u nás se hodně dělají omáčky (rajská, koprová, svíčková, kuře na paprice, guláš, …), ..."

    "Doma mám tlupu chlapů, kteří jsou knedlíkoví a omáčkoví."


    "Nový generace už nebudou knedlíkový a omáčkový." (context: the contemporary Czechs prefer dumplings with gravy to other dishes; náš národ je knedlíkový a omáčkový - Pepiczki knedliczki).
     

    Ben Jamin

    Senior Member
    Polish
    For me the expression "jestem kartoflany, chlebowy, zupny" sounds weird, like a foreigner translating literally his idioms into Polish (something like "dać ci windę?". "Ja jestem zupiasty" means for me only "I am souplike".
     

    DW

    Banned
    Polish
    Okay, let me tell you this, I'd venture to guess that adding something like the English guy would solve all the problem. "I'm not really an apple guy." would be an idiomatic English expression and mean nothing but "I don't generally like apples very much."; same as "Nie jestem jabłkowym gościem." would be a fine Polish sentence to my ears meaning "Nie przepadam aż tak strasznie za jabłkami.". Hope that helps. :)
     
    Last edited:

    Ben Jamin

    Senior Member
    Polish
    Okay, let me tell you this, I'd venture to guess that adding something like the English guy would solve all the problem. "I'm not really an apple guy." would be an idiomatic English expression and mean nothing but "I don't generally like apples very much."; same as "Nie jestem jabłkowym gościem." would be a fine Polish sentence to my ears meaning "Nie przepadam aż tak strasznie za jabłkami.". Hope that helps. :)
    "Nie jestem kasztanowym ludzikiem" sounds more familiar to me than ""Nie jestem jabłkowym gościem."
     

    DW

    Banned
    Polish
    "Nie jestem kasztanowym ludzikiem" sounds more familiar to me than ""Nie jestem jabłkowym gościem."
    I don't quite know what you're talking about, but mind you, although "Nie jestem jabłkowym gościem" is not a standard way to speak your mind, it's - at least to my ears - entirely understandable and even neat, I'd say.
     

    dreamlike

    Senior Member
    Polish
    There is no officially recognized adjective derived from the noun "zupa", but what I thought of instantly on reading this thread was "zupny". I can vaguely remember hearing the phrase "zupna uczta" used at some point in my life. :)

    As Ben-Jamin has already written, it is too close to 'dupny'.
    Is there any particular reason why the two of you had this sort of association? :D Just like Thomas, I don't really see why anyone would have one, even more so since the word "dupny" isn't very common, in my experience at least.
     

    Ben Jamin

    Senior Member
    Polish
    I don't quite know what you're talking about, but mind you, although "Nie jestem jabłkowym gościem" is not a standard way to speak your mind, it's - at least to my ears - entirely understandable and even neat, I'd say.
    Firstly, I used the adjective "familiar", not "understandable", and I repeat: this expression was entirely unknown to me until I have read it in this thread, and it sounds for me foreign, even weird, or as if it was a kindergarten kid experimenting with words, and I have right to feel so being a competent native Polish speaker.
     

    Ben Jamin

    Senior Member
    Polish
    I don't quite know what you're talking about, but mind you, although "Nie jestem jabłkowym gościem" is not a standard way to speak your mind, it's - at least to my ears - entirely understandable and even neat, I'd say.
    Na podstawie poszukiwań w internecie powziąłem podejrzenie, że «jestem zupny [człowiek]» to bohemizm (w dzisiejszych czasach duża rzadkość). Samo użycie tej konstrukcji wydaje się też rzadkie. Ot, taka mutacja, jakich tysiące, z których przeżywa niewiele. Wyrażenie to nie weszło w każdym razie do języka standardowego, i nie wiadomo, czy kiedykolwiek to się stanie.
     

    jasio

    Senior Member
    I don't have the anal association with the word "zupny" to tell the truth. Have those who experience it also got one when they hear "zupa"? Seriously.
    Perhaps I played with 'ząb, zupa zębowa, dąb, zupa dębowa' too often. ;)

    A note for foreign readers: it's a common children's game. The phrase literally means 'a tooth, a tooth soup, an oak, an oak soop', but when said really fast the toungue tends to slip to '...dąb, dupa dębowa', meaning '...an oak, an oak ass'.

    Maggi - tekuté polévkové koření.
    Maggi - aromatyczna przyprawa w płynie, do zup (mostly).
    Stupid me; you're right. ;)

    Jsem polévkový. = I like soups. I eat soups very often. I eat soup before every main dish.
    It's so common in Poland, that it wouldn't probably need any special distinction. ;)

    Anyway, the idea of using an adjective in this context sounds rather strange for me. I would most naturally say simply 'lubię' (I like) or ('wolę') (I prefer) depending on context, unless I wanted to make a joke that I eat so many potatoes that I'm almost turning into a potato myself.
     

    marrish

    Senior Member
    اُردو Urdu
    A neighbour of mine told me that "Jestem zupowiczem" would express this idea adequately.
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top