pub vs bar

Thomas1

Senior Member
polszczyzna warszawska
I've heard there's a difference between bar and pub-but i can't find it in any dictionary-maybe here is someone who could explain it to me please???:)
 
  • Thomas1

    Senior Member
    polszczyzna warszawska
    and that's it?? :)

    thought it was gonna be some more ...

    anyway thanks a lot languageGuy;)
     

    Helicopta

    Senior Member
    England - English (Learning Spanish)
    This is my view from an English perspective, the words may have different meanings in other countries.

    A pub is where you can go for a drink, often during the day as well as at night and very often they serve food and some even offer accomodation. In a pub, the 'bar' is the counter where you go to be served your drink, so-called because there is usually a brass rail or 'bar' that runs along the bottom that you can rest your feet on. Many have two rooms, one called 'the public bar' (also known as 'the bar') and 'the lounge'. The bar is where you might go to play pool or darts and in some older, more traditional pubs, bar skittles or billiards. The lounge is where you go to sit in more comfort and enjoy conversation.

    A bar is very similar to a pub but is less likely to have food or games and certainly wouldn't have accomodation. Also a hotel or other complex that includes a drinking area would be said to have a bar not a pub. You will find bars in town and city centres alongside pubs and sometimes it's hard to say whether such a place is a bar or a pub. You won't find bars in villages out in the countyside though. Most country pubs are more traditional and many have 'beer gardens' where you can take your drinks and sit outside on warm summer days.

    Here is a lovely country pub, not too far from where I live... now I'm getting thirsty!
    sondesarmsrockingham.jpg
     

    languageGuy

    Senior Member
    USA and English
    Maybe my answer was too brief, but in the USA, that is the basic difference. Pubs offer meals, and therefore have dining tables, and a quieter atmosphere, a little more intimate.

    Bars are usally more active and louder.

    Both of course feature alcohol.
     

    DesertCat

    Senior Member
    inglese | English
    But, in the US we would be more likely to call a pub a tavern and only serve beer (and perhaps wine but it would likely not be good wine) while a bar would serve hard liquor. Unless it's a "sports bar", in which case it may be more like a tavern/pub.

    Also, in many states all places that serve alcohol are required to serve some food even if it's only chips and hotdogs regardless of the category of alcohol served.
     

    te gato

    Senior Member
    Alberta--TGE (te gato English)
    Here a Pub is like a English pub..where you go to relax..try and play a few games of darts.. hitting everything but the dart-board...and drinking your draft beer...

    The bars are noisy..crowded...full of the 'Hey baby' drooling all over types...spilling their draft beer...

    te gato;)
     

    Thomas1

    Senior Member
    polszczyzna warszawska
    i can see that very often the differences between bar and pub are so vague that it is sometimes hard to define if we are in a pub or bar, and it also depends on the country

    thank you all a lot:)
     

    te gato

    Senior Member
    Alberta--TGE (te gato English)
    Thomas1 said:
    i can see that very often the differences between bar and pub are so vague that it is sometimes hard to define if we are in a pub or bar, and it also depends on the country

    thank you all a lot:)
    Hey Thomas;

    Yes very vague...here we have 'pub' crawls...this is just where you go from bar to bar..until you can no longer walk and have to crawl to the next one...why do they call it 'a pub crawl'..when you are going to 'bars'..I have no idea!!
    Ooppss..you are welcome...

    te gato;)
     

    mzsweeett

    Senior Member
    USA
    USA, American English
    te gato said:
    Hey Thomas;

    Yes very vague...here we have 'pub' crawls...this is just where you go from bar to bar..until you can no longer walk and have to crawl to the next one...why do they call it 'a pub crawl'..when you are going to 'bars'..I have no idea!!
    Ooppss..you are welcome...

    te gato;)
    LOL Te Gato, I guess the saying of the "5 man hold up" rings true to your imagery of the pub crawl...lol 5 men walking side by side holding each other up!!! for a laugh check out the attached pic...taken from a "bar" in England, not sure which one though...
     

    timpeac

    Senior Member
    English (England)
    Helicopta said:
    This is my view from an English perspective, the words may have different meanings in other countries.

    A pub is where you can go for a drink, often during the day as well as at night and very often they serve food and some even offer accomodation. In a pub, the 'bar' is the counter where you go to be served your drink, so-called because there is usually a brass rail or 'bar' that runs along the bottom that you can rest your feet on. Many have two rooms, one called 'the public bar' (also known as 'the bar') and 'the lounge'. The bar is where you might go to play pool or darts and in some older, more traditional pubs, bar skittles or billiards. The lounge is where you go to sit in more comfort and enjoy conversation.

    A bar is very similar to a pub but is less likely to have food or games and certainly wouldn't have accomodation. Also a hotel or other complex that includes a drinking area would be said to have a bar not a pub. You will find bars in town and city centres alongside pubs and sometimes it's hard to say whether such a place is a bar or a pub. You won't find bars in villages out in the countyside though. Most country pubs are more traditional and many have 'beer gardens' where you can take your drinks and sit outside on warm summer days.

    Here is a lovely country pub, not too far from where I live... now I'm getting thirsty!
    http://www.pub-explorer.com/nhants/photos/sondesarmsrockingham.jpghttp://www.pub-explorer.com/nhants/photos/sondesarmsrockingham.jpg

    This is a good summary for the UK. To it I would add -

    A pub will almost always have a hanging sign outside with a picture illustrating the name. A bar won't

    Pubs are often called weird names such as "the fiddler's elbow" or very often "the x and y" "the cat and whistle" or represent an event "the battle of trafalgar" or someone's name "the Queen's arms". Bars are not called names like this - maybe just something like "mario's" or something much less flowery.

    Bars will almost certainly serve cocktails. Pubs will serve spirits but you are likely to get a blank look if you ask for "a manhattan" or something like that, so you need to know the ingredients of your favourite cocktails!

    Bars are more expensive!

    Thomas - I can fully see why you think that the distinction between pub and bar is quite blurred, however I would add I think that a British person could tell you within seconds whether a certain place was a pub or a bar but it is very difficult to define.:eek:
     

    jacinta

    Senior Member
    USA English
    te gato said:
    Hey Thomas;

    Yes very vague...here we have 'pub' crawls...this is just where you go from bar to bar..until you can no longer walk and have to crawl to the next one...why do they call it 'a pub crawl'..when you are going to 'bars'..I have no idea!!
    Ooppss..you are welcome...

    te gato;)

    te gato: We call this "bar-hopping" when you go from bar to bar.

    Here on the west coast of the ole US of A, we don't use the word pub. They are all bars or taverns. Once and a while there will be an English pub, with the specific theme of being "English" or Irish. They will be decorated in that theme and the word pub will be in the name.
     

    DesertCat

    Senior Member
    inglese | English
    Jacinta,

    That's true, but I have noticed that a lot of the microbrews refer to themselves as "brew pubs" especially in the Pacific Northwest.
     

    Thomas1

    Senior Member
    polszczyzna warszawska
    thank you guys a bunch, this forum is really great:)

    ps: Te Gato -> LOL:D

    one more time thanks a lot
     

    Nocciolina

    Senior Member
    USA
    English
    As a Brit I would say that a bar is more up market than a pub. A pub is where you would go to have a pint, maybe play some pool, have some lunch or a bag of salt 'n' vinegar crisps. A bar often has a dance floor/area, a pub wouldn't. Pubs are for hanging out with friends, bars are for getting dolled up and going out on the pull.
     

    Thomas1

    Senior Member
    polszczyzna warszawska
    thanks Nocciolina
    one more question
    does doll up mean to get dressed and do all the stuff to look attractive, and pull the power to attract sb to you:) ??
     

    te gato

    Senior Member
    Alberta--TGE (te gato English)
    jacinta said:
    te gato: We call this "bar-hopping" when you go from bar to bar.

    Here on the west coast of the ole US of A, we don't use the word pub. They are all bars or taverns. Once and a while there will be an English pub, with the specific theme of being "English" or Irish. They will be decorated in that theme and the word pub will be in the name.
    Hey jacinta;
    Ok..We are a little odd here..note I said A LITTLE :D ...
    Sure we go 'bar-hopping'..as well..but this is not an organized event..a few people get together to hop from bar to bar...(and why hop?) after a few bars..no one is able to walk..let-alone hop!!
    But a 'Pub-Crawl' is an organized event..you buy tickets..and the deal is...go to as many bars as you can in a specific time given...trust me..in the end you are CRAWLING!! looking to talk to the big white telephone... due to the fact that only shooters are served..

    te gato;)
     

    lainyn

    Senior Member
    Canadian English
    Te Gato, you've described our Canadianisms perfectly!

    Now, I pose you (foreros) this question: in your opinion, is there a difference between a bar and a club?

    IMHO, a club's primary purpose is dancing, and it usually has club music, unlike a bar - which has the liberty of playing more diverse genres.

    -Lainyn
     

    te gato

    Senior Member
    Alberta--TGE (te gato English)
    Thomas1 said:
    thank you guys a bunch, this forum is really great:)

    ps: Te Gato -> LOL:D

    one more time thanks a lot
    Hey Thomas1;
    Not too sure If I helped or not..
    But you are welcome..one more time..:D

    te gato;)
     

    JLanguage

    Senior Member
    USA: American English, Learning Hebrew and Spanish
    jacinta said:
    te gato: We call this "bar-hopping" when you go from bar to bar.

    Here on the west coast of the ole US of A, we don't use the word pub. They are all bars or taverns. Once and a while there will be an English pub, with the specific theme of being "English" or Irish. They will be decorated in that theme and the word pub will be in the name.

    We have the same situation here in the southeast US - we never use pub unless referring to an Irish or English 'pub'. Also, I've heard of bar-hopping, but never of Te Gato's pub-crawling. Not that I've ever experienced it myself, being underaged and all. ;)
     

    Rebecca Hendry

    Senior Member
    United Kingdom - English
    Pub:

    More old-fashioned
    No cocktails
    No dancefloor
    Pub quizzes
    Beer taps
    For all ages

    Bar:
    More modern
    More EXPENSIVE!
    Bottled beer
    Sometimes a small dancefloor
    Generally younger people go to bars
    Cocktails

    I'll think of more differences! :D
     

    Thomas1

    Senior Member
    polszczyzna warszawska
    te gato said:
    Hey Thomas1;
    Not too sure If I helped or not..
    But you are welcome..one more time..:D

    te gato;)

    Te gato you did tahnks a lot
    the reason i "loled" was that I imagined drunk people crawling from a bar, i think they don't get so tired only after walking from bar to bar, do they??:D
    and thanks for invitation;) you're welcome too (we don't have "pub crawls" but if you do want to crawl from a bar-i can guarantee that it's possible in Poland too:D )

    Rebecca Hendry said:
    Pub:

    More old-fashioned
    No cocktails
    No dancefloor
    Pub quizzes
    Beer taps
    For all ages

    Bar:
    More modern
    More EXPENSIVE!
    Bottled beer
    Sometimes a small dancefloor
    Generally younger people go to bars
    Cocktails

    I'll think of more differences! :D
    thanks Rebecca you gave me very clear differences :)
     

    Nocciolina

    Senior Member
    USA
    English
    Yes, you hit the nail on the head.
    To get dolled up means to put on your glad rags, a bit of lipstick and pout those lips. To go out on the pull means to go out looking for a mate.
     

    yolanda_van huyck

    Senior Member
    Spain- Spanish
    i'm sorry, i cut the message...
    as i said, in Spain we have some differences:
    - PUB; it's open just in the evening, you can't eat anything there and it's like a little disco with music and sometimes a little dance floor.
    - BAR, there are plenty of them in Spain, you can eat, drink, play games, enjoy Spanish tapas, it's always noisy... and they're open all day long

    regards

    Yolanda
     

    te gato

    Senior Member
    Alberta--TGE (te gato English)
    Rebecca Hendry said:
    Pub:

    More old-fashioned
    No cocktails
    No dancefloor
    Pub quizzes
    Beer taps
    For all ages

    Bar:
    More modern
    More EXPENSIVE!
    Bottled beer
    Sometimes a small dancefloor
    Generally younger people go to bars
    Cocktails

    I'll think of more differences! :D
    Big difference here...you must be 18 to enter either..and children are NOT allowed in no matter what...and bouncers stand at the door checking I.D...
    It is quite a compliment when you are my age and get 'carded'...:D
    te gato;)
     

    Cybershark

    New Member
    English
    A Pub is where our sons' and daugthers' go; we would never accept that they go to BARS. It's the same thing; Pubs, in PR, mostly have college students as customers.

    In PR it's an age thing. Therefore, in my book Pub = Bar.
     

    scrotgrot

    Senior Member
    English - English
    These definitions have pretty much covered all bases. To them, I would add that a bar is maybe a mid-point between a pub and a club. At a bar, there is no food, stronger, fruitier drinks, more standing while drinking, generally music playing, possibly an opportunity to dance. But at a club the music is very loud and the focus is on the dancing.

    Note that in any establishment of this kind the bar also refers to the actual counter at which you order your drinks.

    Edit: someone's really raised this thread up from the depths of hell.
     

    Cybershark

    New Member
    English
    Again, in PR being the tropics, in bars and pubs you get the same type of drinks, they have music, live on weekends and other type of means during the week.

    In truth, the real difference is the ambience, Pubs are very modern in their looks including the electronics and the music. All dress very attractive and modern. Smell great too.

    The Bars are more traditional in looks music and customers; don't get me wrong im talking about lawyers, judges, enginners, etc. Here they talk about there day since, not all can do the same at home. All dress with their work clothes, smell more or less.

    There are Bars where regular Joes go, the hands on workers, construction, etc. All dress with their work clothes ...... and smelllllll like swet, etc.

    So if you are planning to open this type of bussiness; you first look at your budget, what type of clients you want attending. So if you have the budget you will go for a Pub.

    If you have a more or less budget you will go for a Bar for ambienced for proffessionals.

    If you have a less budget you will go for a Bar for the average worker were the ambient is no issue.

    So like I say a Pub = Bar.
     

    Cybershark

    New Member
    English
    te gato

    The difference is in what part of the world you live in; the culture and therefore. their interpretation. In PR it is like I have described them, that is why we don't want our kids (18+) go to bars.

    So when you visit PR your kids (18+) should go to Pubs and when I go to the States my Kids should go to Bars, interesting, ja.

    So whenever we visit a different country; always ask!!!!
     

    Cagey

    post mod (English Only / Latin)
    English - US
    Welcome Cybershark. :)

    I take it that you are referring to Puerto Rico.
    I want to make it explicit because people from other parts of the world may not be familiar with this abbreviation. Also, I want to give you a chance to correct me if I am mistaken.

    As you say, the words pub and bar are used differently in different parts of the world. Your contribution is interesting.
     
    Last edited:
    I've heard there's a difference between bar and pub-but i can't find it in any dictionary-maybe here is someone who could explain it to me please???:)
    Hi all, I'm an English, Englishman, in fact an actual born 'cockney'.

    I came across this thread as I tried to find out the U.S.A usage of 'pub' as I read a lot of fiction and often email authors who write a story based in UK but have no intimate knowledge of it so may words they use would just never be used in 'English' dialog.

    I have worked with 'Americans' abroad for a considerable number of years, oil exploration and I was the only 'Brit' in site often.
    So I having arrived here and read a little there is no apparent decent definition of the difference.

    'Pub' is short for 'public house', a building licenced to sell and have alcohol consumed on the premises. A 'pub' can be small and only have one 'bar' to large that could have many.
    The two main 'bars' are:
    The 'public bar' as in for everyone though 'posh' or 'rich' people would go in the 'saloon' described below. A bar you stand at, some chairs with small tables for drinks, Darts, dominoes, cards (Crib) are played. 'Pool' is now common but formerly there was 'Bar Billiards' quarter or third sized tables with a 'small' red ball so it went through the 'trap' which caught the two 'cue' balls so you had to pay to get it back but signified the end of the game being a one 'foul' game.
    A 'saloon bar' which has soft chairs, carpet, maybe stools at the bar, no darts or pool but maybe of old (twenty plus years ago) a snooker table though it would need a big saloon and then probable in an adjoining room.
    Other bars could be; 'Tap room', real low rent, no seats and just beer. 'Snug', a small seated room often with no access to an actual bar to get served, sometimes an internal 'window', often used by the oldest generation especially women. 'Off Licence' was a room you could go in to buy drinks etc to take home, longer licence hours than in a 'bar'. Where I regularly went as a kid to redeem the deposits from beer bottles that I found around especially on a weekend morning, I could double and treble my pocket money easy, it helped to finance my passion for fishing, train fares and licences weren't cheap even then! (1950/60's0.
    Some UK pubs are centuries old, a few I believe close to a millennium, many are several centuries through extended/rebuilt maybe several times.

    'Bars' are just 'bars' you have them IN 'pubs' but the trend for 'bars' in shopping and entertainment areas has grown from American and Continental influence.

    I now get the USA's usage of 'pub', remnants of colonialism the same as Australia and New Zealand use 'pub' in their own context now.
     

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    We rarely use "pub" in the USA. But we often have a restaurant with a separate bar. The bar serves drinks and perhaps some appetizers (hors d'oeuvre), or the ones I go to, some beer nuts.

    The restaurant serves meals and drinks. They would ordinarily be in the same building.
     

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    Perhaps it's regional, but "pub" is used frequently hereabouts, although those establishments usually do not have those charming signs hanging outside.

    :thumbsup::thumbsup:

    I have seen "gastropubs" but it sounds like something from the Merck Manual, not a place I would like to drink in.
     

    Uncle Jack

    Senior Member
    British English
    I have seen "gastropubs" but it sounds like something from the Merck Manual, not a place I would like to drink in.
    We have them over here, and I tend to avoid them too. Many pubs in Britain manage to combine eating and drinking without any problem, but it is all too easy for a pub to focus on its diners at the expense of people who merely want to drink and socialise. I suppose, with "gastropub", pubs that want to do this now have a label to give themselves, so drinkers can easily avoid them.

    It is even possible to ask the question in England, "Is it an eating pub or a drinking pub?"
     
    Top