pull a wardrobe

emre aydın

Senior Member
Turkish
A singer is angry, speaking with her manager:

+ Did you see the wardrobe they pulled? It's crap.
- They're in New York shopping for you right now.

(I think "they" might be referring to her label)

(Nashville)

What is the definition for "pull" here? Thanks for your help.
 
  • emre aydın

    Senior Member
    Turkish
    Do you have more details? How exactly does the "wardrobe" part fit into the context?
    There is no detail about the "wardrobe" part.

    She's onstage, singing. Then her voice sounds distorted. She throws the earphone down, seems angry with her sound engineer.

    Then goes off the stage and starts to speak with her manager.

    Manager: You sounded great.
    Singer: No, it's not sounding great. You need to talk to him because he's gonna make me deaf.
    Manager: All right, I'll talk to him.
    Singer: Did you see the wardrobe they pulled. It's crap.
    Manager: They're in NYC shopping for you right now.
    Singer(to her crew): Y'all, I'm sorry. It's... You know, having a diva dip. (to her manager) Gonna get something to eat. I'm sorry.
     

    PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    Wardrobe = the range of costumes available for use by actors/performers.
    To add to You little ripper: to pull - to take [something from somewhere] without much thought/consideration: "He pulled a pair of socks from the draw and put them on."
     

    pob14

    Senior Member
    American English
    To expand on PaulQ's answer: The wardrobe/costume department has a large number of outfits available. They "pull" (select from among those outfits) something for the performer to wear. This is the commonly-used phrasing in theatre, so I assume it's used in this context also.
     

    kentix

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    They "pull" (select from among those outfits)

    No, this is different. This is more like slang.
    She could mean 'to pull one' which means to be deceptive/play a trick on someone. I assume she doesn't like the outfit they've given her to wear.
    Little Ripper has the right idea.

    Simple example:
    Tom secretly glues a coin to the floor. Then later, when his friend comes over, Tom points to the coin and says, "I think you dropped that." The friend reaches down and tries to pick up the coin but he can't because it's stuck to the floor. Then he laughs and turns to Tom and says, "You pulled a good one on me," meaning a good trick. He could also say, "That was a good trick you pulled (on me)." but the "on me" is not necessary to say.

    When she says "...pulled" she means "...pulled on me". She's accusing them of tricking her, not in a literal way, but figuratively. She doesn't like any of the clothes they've brought for her to wear and she's basically saying they're incompetent. She doesn't think they've really tricked her and gave her bad clothes on purpose but she's very mad and she's acting like that.
     
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    Glenfarclas

    Senior Member
    English (American)
    To expand on PaulQ's answer: The wardrobe/costume department has a large number of outfits available. They "pull" (select from among those outfits) something for the performer to wear. This is the commonly-used phrasing in theatre, so I assume it's used in this context also.
    I agree completely. This is the correct interpretation.
     

    kentix

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    I can totally understand that interpretation and it is plausible but I think it's wrong for two reasons.

    1) If they pulled a wardrobe that she didn't like from all those clothes in the back then all they have to do to fix the situation is go in the back and pull a different wardrobe. Instead, they sent people to New York for new clothes.

    2) From all the questions posted about this show, I've learned that it is full of slang, idioms and casual and regional speech. The speaker is a spoiled singer who is having a tantrum. Under those circumstances she is even more likely to resort to slang and idiom rather than suddenly start speaking using technical terms from the theater industry.

    It all hinges on whether she meant "pulled on me" or "pulled for me".
     
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    Scott AM

    Senior Member
    English - Canada
    For what it's worth, I agree with pob14 on this. She's upset with the wardrobe that was "pulled for her" (selected for her to wear). It's not a very technical term at all, and it doesn't imply that there is a large selection of clothes that can be immediately selected from, either.

    On the other hand, using "pulled" to mean "they pulled this on me" (as in, they're pulling a joke by giving me this wardrobe) doesn't sound quite right to me.
     

    fiercediva

    Senior Member
    American English
    This is not just theater talk, but also professional fashion stylist talk. A celebrity stylist like Rachel Zoe or Brandon Maxwell has access to a huge stock of vintage and new designer clothing, shoes and accessories for their clientele, and their assistants will pull and put together complete outfits ("looks") from that stock for the celebrity to try on and choose from. "Pulling" is also used to describe a stylist trying to borrow a coveted item directly from a designer/the runway in return for the exposure the designer will get from the celebrity identifying the item at a public event.
     
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    kentix

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    Thanks, Emre. I want to hear how they say the words. Sometimes that's the only way to know. So far I haven't found a place I can listen.
     
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