Pull out your cricket

Angel Pivoine

New Member
English Canada
Hello,

A young Franco-Irish friend studying in England was recently told to "pull out your cricket" after she and her friends had given a theatre performance. Is this in any way a compliment? Or an exhortation to work harder? Or something altogether different? I would appreciate any clues!

Thank you.
 
  • liliput

    Senior Member
    U.K. English
    How bizarre! I've never heard such an expression. I wonder if it relates to the game of cricket or to the insect. Could it have some relation to the piece that your friend performed?
    It sounds potentially rude, but I can't imagine what it means. By "rude" I mean the type of sexual comment like "Show us your tits!" although I can't picture a similarity to any part of the human anatomy. Was the comment directed in this manner? Did it seem friendly, lewd, aggressive, joking? Was it shouted from across the street, or was it face to face?
     

    tottallyoff

    Senior Member
    russian
    I think it would mean that the performance either:

    1. good - left the audience stunned and you could her the crickets churp
    2. bad - The show was so bad that the place where the show was held was so empty that you could hear the crickets churp (again)
     

    cuchuflete

    Senior Member
    EEUU-inglés
    I think it would mean that the performance either:

    1. good - left the audience stunned and you could her the crickets churp
    2. bad - The show was so bad that the place where the show was held was so empty that you could hear the crickets churp (again)
    Are these guesses or speculations, or are they based on any use you have ever heard of the phrase?
     

    difficult cuss

    Senior Member
    English England
    I think that it was misheard. I have never heard the expression and could find no instance of it on the internet (usually a reasonable indicator).
    We have the expression "pull your finger out" which means to make more effort, could it have been that?
     

    Angel Pivoine

    New Member
    English Canada
    Thank you all.

    I also checked on the Internet before posting, and found nothing, so the expression may have been misheard, true. My friend was told that it was something "all good Irishmen should know." I'll see if I can't get more context.
     

    panjandrum

    Occasional Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    Thank you all.

    I also checked on the Internet before posting, and found nothing, so the expression may have been misheard, true. My friend was told that it was something "all good Irishmen should know." I'll see if I can't get more context.
    My emphasis - but it lets me off the hook.
    It's not an expression that rings any bells with me either.
    What we have here is:
    Angel, reporting, D, what her friend said.
    The friend is Franco-Irish - with I wonder what cultural background?
    The friend reports something, C, understood to have been said by someone - perhaps English?
    This person suggests that the saying, B, should be familiar to all good Irishmen.
    The original good Irishman said A.

    There are several cross-cultural steps from an original statement by a good Irishman to "Pull out your cricket." Plenty of room for misunderstanding.
    Can you fill in any more cultural stereotypes along the way?

    A Canadian - ???
    listening to someone Franco-Irish - ???
    reporting something said by someon English - ???
    that is believed to be familiar to good Irishmen.
     

    difficult cuss

    Senior Member
    English England
    My Irish colleagues have never heard this phrase, nor anything like it.
    Is it possible that "critic" may have been said? Maybe the advice was to get the critic out of the theatre? This is of course simply a guess.
     

    liliput

    Senior Member
    U.K. English
    Another idea occured to me. What if the man said something in Gaelic that was assumed to be English? After all, a good Irishman would know some Gaelic wouldn't he?
    Unfortunately, I'm not even a bad Irishman so I can't help with Gaelic.
     
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