pull to the curb

soleil-sol

Senior Member
English-American
Hello Hola, how would you say,
Pull to the curb. in spanish?
i.e. when you want someone whom is driving to move the car being driven to the side of the street and be away from traffic, to the border of a sidewalk.
Thank you,
soleil-sol
 
  • gengo

    Senior Member
    American English
    Pull to the curb. in Spanish?
    i.e. when you want someone who is driving to move the car being driven to the side of the street and be away from traffic, to the border of a sidewalk.

    The dictionary gives the following:
    pull over vi phrasal(move vehicle to kerb)desviarse hacia la cuneta loc verb
    (vehículo)hacerse a un lado loc verb
    (AR)estacionar junto al cordón loc verb

    When he saw the flashing lights in the rear-view mirror, he pulled over.
    Cuando vio las luces intermitentes en el retrovisor, se desvió hacia la cuneta.
    estacionarse v prnl
    Cuando vio las luces intermitentes en el retrovisor, se estacionó.
    (ES)irse al arcén loc verb
    (AR)irse a la banquina loc verb
    Cuando vio las luces intermitentes en el retrovisor, se fue al arcén.


    However, I think a native speaker might say something simpler, such as "Párate aquí."
     

    melasa

    Senior Member
    English & Spanish, USA born
    La orilla de la acera/banqueta

    La subida de la acera a la orilla de la calle.

    (Critique of the above is welcome)

    My understanding of “cuneta” is that it is the drop off to the side of the shoulder of a road, and not a “curb”?
    E.G. the continual ditch.
    The curb to me is where the street meets the sidewalk, and the sidewalk is several inches higher than the street, hence, this is a curb to me… So it’s not necessarily “una cuneta” , or, la orilla de la acera, it actually refers to the height of the sidewalk right at the edge of the street… Maybe in English this is specific, and not so specific in Spanish to this exact description?

    I was wondering if some of the terms to translate this specifically refer to this edge of the sidewalk which is higher than the street?(that precise spot)
     

    OtroLencho

    Senior Member
    English - Western US
    I was wondering if some of the terms to translate this specifically refer to this edge of the sidewalk which is higher than the street?(that precise spot)

    I have also wondered about this and after investigating decided that in Mexico, at least, the yellow part is "guarnición".


    guarnicion.png
     
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    Ballenero

    Senior Member
    Spaniard
    when you want someone whom is driving to move the car being driven to the side of the street and be away from traffic, to the border of a sidewalk.
    ¿Quieres decir que aparque? o sea que baje del coche y se vaya, dejándolo allí.

    Aparcar
    1. tr. Colocar transitoriamente en un lugar coches u otrosvehículos.
    2. tr. Dicho de un conductor: Detener su vehículo y colocarlo transitoriamente en un lugar.
    La orilla de la acera/banqueta

    La subida de la acera a la orilla de la calle.

    (Critique of the above is welcome)

    My understanding of “cuneta” is that it is the drop off to the side of the shoulder of a road, and not a “curb”?
    E.G. the continual ditch.
    The curb to me is where the street meets the sidewalk, and the sidewalk is several inches higher than the street, hence, this is a curb to me… So it’s not necessarily “una cuneta” , or, la orilla de la acera, it actually refers to the height of the sidewalk right at the edge of the street… Maybe in English this is specific, and not so specific in Spanish to this exact description?

    I was wondering if some of the terms to translate this specifically refer to this edge of the sidewalk which is higher than the street?(that precise spot)
    You’re right.

    La cuneta está en las carreteras.
    En la ciudad, salvo en grandes avenidas quizás, no hay cunetas.
    Entonces:
    aparcar o parar.
    Pare junto a la acera.
    Párate ahí junto al bordillo.

    En México banqueta.
    En CentrAm y NorSudAm acera y banqueta.
    En Argentina vereda.
     

    franzjekill

    Mod E/S
    Español rioplatense
    My understanding of “cuneta” is that it is the drop off to the side of the shoulder of a road, and not a “curb”?
    E.G. the continual ditch.
    Sí, en mi país es tal cual. En rutas, lo que está pegado a la carretera se llama banquina (no hay veredas ni cordones de veredas). Si un auto se va a la cuneta es que tuvo un accidente. La cuneta cumple la función de evacuar el agua de lluvia y evitar que se inunde la carretera con cualquier lluvia mediana. Así que si te para la policía de tránsito, lo que te dicen es que prendas los señaleros y te estaciones en la banquina.
     

    OtroLencho

    Senior Member
    English - Western US
    The question for me is always what would be the best term of this to use while interpreting, while perhaps not necessarily knowing the country the person is from.

    I assume most of your interpreting there in Seattle is with Mexicans (as it is here in Eastern Washington); I just did a little searching and "guarnición" is used not only there but in Nicaragua and Panamá, so if nobody suggests otherwise, I'd personally feel comfortable with that as my "go-to" term.
     

    nanel

    Senior Member
    Spanish - Spain
    For future reference, in Spain the yellow part is called "bordillo", but I imagine a police officer saying: "por favor, échese a un lado y detenga el coche".
     

    gengo

    Senior Member
    American English
    To further confuse the picture, I was just told by a Mexican arquitect that it's called the "machuelo". Can any other Mexicans corroborate that?

    Here is a thread in which two Mexicans confirm that usage.

    In another thread, zumac (Mexican) said, "In Mexico, curb would be 'cuneta.'"
     

    gengo

    Senior Member
    American English
    From my paper dictionary
    Curb. barbada :confused:(what?)||freno con barbada||sujeción||brocal de pozo||contener.

    I think that is referring to the verb "to curb."

    1.
    a.
    To check, restrain, or control (an impulse or activity, for example); rein in. See Synonyms at restrain.
    b. To prevent (a person or group) from doing something or acting in a certain way.

    And from that verb, we get the noun curb:
    4. Something that checks or restrains: High interest rates put a curb on spending.
     

    melasa

    Senior Member
    English & Spanish, USA born
    Here is a thread in which two Mexicans confirm that usage.

    In another thread, zumac (Mexican) said, "In Mexico, curb would be 'cuneta.'"
    I actually don’t think that there is one best go to word to use. Because one can think it’s the best “go to”word, and you could use it with a Spanish-speaker, but their best “go to”word might be something different, and they might not know what you’re talking about, or think it’s something else… when I say go to word, I’m referring to what OtroLecho mentioned, But also, combined with what you mentioned here, realizing that a true definition of this for many Spanish-speakers remains very nebulous.
    That is why, if you definitely just need to focus on the meaning, and not necessarily a specific term, la orilla/el borde de la banqueta/acera may universally get the job done… Yes, it sounds a bit unorthodox… but you sure would avoid someone saying ¿Qué es eso? …. Because, don’t get me wrong, all of the specific terms that we heard are correct, not so much Cuneta, but anyhow… If you use any of them, you take the gamble of the person not really knowing… this term is just more nebulous in the Spanish language. In English, if you say curb, there is no debate on how to say this, everyone knows that a curb is a curb. This is just the nature of how this term is understood and used differently in the Spanish-speaking world. I interpreted for a Spanish speaker once, and we were referring to the ditch along the side of the road, which is a “cuneta”, but to her, it was “el hoyo.” My point, not only are there many precise words depending on the region, people ALSO have their own reality of what the word is to them, and beg to differ. Cunetas to me slope down, and are not an upright edge like that one picture in this thread, which is specifically what I’m referring to.
    Maybe cuneta used as gutter is what that link was getting it… Where the water flows along side flush with the curb? I can maybe see that is an acceptable use of cuneta as curb…but not really. However, that is not even the raised edge. Curb is all about the “raised” edge, like the picture in the thread that was provided. Or, at least referring to the edge of the sidewalk, as its definition is stated on dictionary.com. Click images For the Cuneta entry on word reference. It is either a ditch that slopes down at the side of the road, or a cement curb that slopes down, as to help water flow. Sort of like a curb, yes, definitely, because it does have a raised edge, but the big difference is, that after the raised edge, it has a slope downward to help water flow(gutter)… I think the term could’ve been generically used for any kind of curb, but it’s not entirely accurate to the kind of curb from the picture that was provided in the thread, which does not slope down, as to have water flow as a gutter. And also, it is also a continual ditch along the side of the road-another way of using cuneta.
     
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    Rocko!

    Senior Member
    Español - México
    Un reglamento de tránsito (MX) en internet dice:
    Detener el vehículo junto a la banqueta del lado derecho y, sin invadir a ésta, para que los ocupantes puedan ascender o descender con seguridad. En zonas rurales deberán hacerlo en lugares destinados para tal efecto y, a falta de éstos, fuera de la superficie de rodamiento.
    Ese "fuera de la superficie de rodamiento" creo que significa "abandonar el tráfico vehícular".
    En otra página y sin relación con el párrafo anterior:
    Asimismo, señalará los lugares donde esté prohibido el estacionamiento de cualquier tipo de vehículo por medio de una franja pintada sobre la guarnición de las banquetas apoyándose con las placas correspondientes que indiquen tal prohibición.
    También he visto que en algunas avenidas, calles y carreteras existe esta guarnición pero sin banqueta, es decir, una estructura de cemento de aprox. 15-20 cm de alto y 10-15 de ancho, a lo largo de todo el camino.
    En otra página, sin relación con las anteriores y esta vez refiriéndose a las personas que van caminando por las vías (peatones):
    Cuando no existan aceras en la vía pública, deberán circular por el acotamiento y a falta de éste, por la orilla de la vía, pero en todo caso, procurará hacerlo dando al frente al tránsito de vehículos.
    Esta vez usaron la palabra "acera" en lugar de "banqueta", por lo que se entiende que son sinónimos o casi sinónimos. El "acotamiento" no sé qué es pero me parece que sería el área que regularmente se reserva para el tráfico de bicicletas y para estacionarse de emergencia. Finalmente "la oriila de la vía" es cuando no hay otra cosa, es decir, calles muy estrechas/angostas.
    Fuente de los párrafos citados: http://www.ordenjuridico.gob.mx/Estatal/HIDALGO/Municipios/Ixmiquilpan/1REGLAMENTO.pdf

    En el caso de los canales para que corra el agua de lluvia, creo que se diría "detener el vehículo lo más cerca de la banqueta/guarnición/guarnición de la banqueta pero sin invadir el canal del desagüe pluvial (no sé qué nombre técnico tenga este canal pluvial).
     
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    iribela

    Senior Member
    USA
    Spanish - Uruguay
    ...That is why, if you definitely just need to focus on the meaning, and not necessarily a specific term, la orilla/el borde de la banqueta/acera may universally get the job done…
    De acuerdo. Pero como ya estableciste que no todo el mundo entendería "banqueta" (para mí es un tipo de asiento) o "acera", ¿por qué no decir 'la orilla/el borde de la calle'?
     

    melasa

    Senior Member
    English & Spanish, USA born
    Yes, but in writing, a curb is sometimes a kerb (BrEn).
    True. But, it still phonetically produces the same word when pronounced.
    Similar to color and BrEn colour.
    I was referring to the English in the United States… True, It could include England as well. Nevertheless, if it is just a difference of the spelling, and not the phonetic sound of the word that it’s specifically referring to, then a curb/kerb is the only predominant word referring to a curb that is used in both of these countries in English, unlike several different ways across Spanish-speaking countries.

    De acuerdo. Pero como ya estableciste que no todo el mundo entendería "banqueta" (para mí es un tipo de asiento) o "acera", ¿por qué no decir 'la orilla/el borde de la calle'?
    True. It can get even more tricky with the use of the word sidewalk. I understand. I suppose the reason why we’re saying it’s the edge of the sidewalk is because of the picture that we have as an example. That 6 inch or so high edge is part of the sidewalk, which is the “curb”, next to the edge of the road.
    If you type in curb on dictionary.com, it talks about concrete or a rim forming an edge for a sidewalk. So that would be still part of the sidewalk… That is what a curb is. This part of the sidewalk, like in the picture, the curb is painted yellow. And, it is next to the edge of the road. Hence the curb meets the road.
     
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    gengo

    Senior Member
    American English
    If you type in curb on dictionary.com, it talks about concrete or a rim forming an edge for a sidewalk. So that would be still part of the sidewalk… That is what a curb is. This part of the sidewalk, like in the picture, the curb is painted yellow. And, it is next to the edge of the road. Hence the curb meets the road.

    The key is not just that a curb is where the sidewalk meets the road. The meaning stems from that of the verb, which is to restrain. A sidewalk curb is what restrains, or curbs, the motion of a vehicle's wheel when the wheel hits the curb. The purpose of a curb is twofold: it makes it less likely that vehicles will go onto the sidewalk, and it prevents flowing rainwater from rising to the sidewalk. In both cases, it is "curbing" encroachment.
     

    melasa

    Senior Member
    English & Spanish, USA born
    Un reglamento de tránsito (MX) en internet dice:

    Ese "fuera de la superficie de rodamiento" creo que significa "abandonar el tráfico vehícular".
    En otra página y sin relación con el párrafo anterior:

    También he visto que en algunas avenidas, calles y carreteras existe esta guarnición pero sin banqueta, es decir, una estructura de cemento de aprox. 15-20 cm de alto y 10-15 de ancho, a lo largo de todo el camino.
    En otra página, sin relación con las anteriores y esta vez refiriéndose a las personas que van caminando por las vías (peatones):

    Esta vez usaron la palabra "acera" en lugar de "banqueta", por lo que se entiende que son sinónimos o casi sinónimos. El "acotamiento" no sé qué es pero me parece que sería el área que regularmente se reserva para el tráfico de bicicletas y para estacionarse de emergencia. Finalmente "la oriila de la vía" es cuando no hay otra cosa, es decir, calles muy estrechas/angostas.
    Fuente de los párrafos citados: http://www.ordenjuridico.gob.mx/Estatal/HIDALGO/Municipios/Ixmiquilpan/1REGLAMENTO.pdf

    En el caso de los canales para que corra el agua de lluvia, creo que se diría "detener el vehículo lo más cerca de la banqueta/guarnición/guarnición de la banqueta pero sin invadir el canal del desagüe pluvial (no sé qué nombre técnico tenga este canal pluvial).
    Desagüe pluvial… tal vez es un término muy técnico de cuneta?
    Acotamiento… I have to research it… Perhaps shoulder of the road then.
    Guarnición-yes, indeed, it does seem to be the most proper and correct term in this country to refer to that yellow edge of the sidewalk as displayed in the picture from this thread.
    I think the confusion lies in that the general public doesn’t read technical documents like this regularly. So they have Colloquial ways of referring to these kind of things.
     

    melasa

    Senior Member
    English & Spanish, USA born
    The key is not just that a curb is where the sidewalk meets the road. The meaning stems from that of the verb, which is to restrain. A sidewalk curb is what restrains, or curbs, the motion of a vehicle's wheel when the wheel hits the curb. The purpose of a curb is twofold: it makes it less likely that vehicles will go onto the sidewalk, and it prevents flowing rainwater from rising to the sidewalk. In both cases, it is "curbing" encroachment.
    Interesting. True, I just looked up the
    definition of to curb.
    That makes sense because, in the middle of the road, sometimes there is also what is called an “A” curb, Which restrains traffic from merging into the opposite lanes, and it’s in the form of the letter A. I believe there are also “C” curbs that form like an island to restrain traffic from a certain spot… I can’t remember what letter that one used, but I think it was C as in its similar shape. But yes, that is very interesting and makes total sense. To “restrain”.
     
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    Silvia Dee

    Senior Member
    spanish
    Hello Hola, how would you say,
    Pull to the curb. in spanish?
    i.e. when you want someone whom is driving to move the car being driven to the side of the street and be away from traffic, to the border of a sidewalk.
    Thank you,
    soleil-sol
    Un España: pull would be “parar”, eg: Para (párate) en el semáforo, para (párate) en la esquina.
    Curb literally means: “bordillo” de la acera (curbside or street)
    But the say is not :”para en el bordillo” sino “para en la acera” (even thought you don’t mean ON the sidewalk/street)
     

    Fernánzde

    New Member
    español-México
    De curiosidad pregunto: hay algún país hispano que diga "hacerse" a la cuneta o vereda u orilla?
    Sí, en Mx se dice también así. Y bromeamos con que el policía de la patrulla diga por el altavoz "Oríllese a la orilla".
     

    Fernánzde

    New Member
    español-México
    Un reglamento de tránsito (MX) en internet dice:

    Ese "fuera de la superficie de rodamiento" creo que significa "abandonar el tráfico vehícular".
    En otra página y sin relación con el párrafo anterior:

    También he visto que en algunas avenidas, calles y carreteras existe esta guarnición pero sin banqueta, es decir, una estructura de cemento de aprox. 15-20 cm de alto y 10-15 de ancho, a lo largo de todo el camino.
    En otra página, sin relación con las anteriores y esta vez refiriéndose a las personas que van caminando por las vías (peatones):

    Esta vez usaron la palabra "acera" en lugar de "banqueta", por lo que se entiende que son sinónimos o casi sinónimos. El "acotamiento" no sé qué es pero me parece que sería el área que regularmente se reserva para el tráfico de bicicletas y para estacionarse de emergencia. Finalmente "la oriila de la vía" es cuando no hay otra cosa, es decir, calles muy estrechas/angostas.
    Fuente de los párrafos citados: http://www.ordenjuridico.gob.mx/Estatal/HIDALGO/Municipios/Ixmiquilpan/1REGLAMENTO.pdf

    En el caso de los canales para que corra el agua de lluvia, creo que se diría "detener el vehículo lo más cerca de la banqueta/guarnición/guarnición de la banqueta pero sin invadir el canal del desagüe pluvial (no sé qué nombre técnico tenga este canal pluvial).
    In Mx we use "banqueta" more than "acera" when in the city, and "acotamiento" (or "cuneta") as a reference in highways, "carreteras".

    Curbside = banqueta / acera.

    Curbside parking = estacionarse "en batería".

    Hope this helps also.
     
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