pulled a mussel

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quietdandelion

Banned
Formosa/Chinese
I went to a seafood disco last week ... and pulled a mussel.


Is there another catch to "pulled a mussel?" Namely, "pulled a muscle."
Does "pulled a muscle" mean "strained or cramped a muscle?" Thanks.
 
  • quietdandelion

    Banned
    Formosa/Chinese
    There's another layer of irony - pulling eg at a disco or party - is the process of finding a new partner too.
    Thanks, cirrus, for the extra catch.
    By the way, could "pulled a mussel" mean litterally "fished/caught a mussel?"

    Ah, good job Cirrus, I didn't pick that up. I guess that's slang we don't use here.

    Normally, dandelion, we just say "I got a cramp in my leg" (for example).
    Thanks, queso.
    Does "got a cramp in my leg" mean exactly the same as "pulled a muscel?"
     

    quietdandelion

    Banned
    Formosa/Chinese
    They aren't the same thing. I'm no physician, so I can't really explain it other than that a cramp is easily worked out, where a pulled muscle requires time to heal.
    Thanks, Tabac, for the explanation.
    I think we also have two corresponding terms, which match your description.
     

    GreenWhiteBlue

    Senior Member
    USA - English
    Quiet one, you are clearly reading some book that has jokes built around plays on words, or puns, or double meanings.

    Since "mussel" (a shellfish) and "muscle" (as in the human body) are pronounced identically, and since "pulled" can mean wrench a part of the body uncomfortably, or find a partner at a disco, the joke here is built around the absurd concept of a "seafood disco" where you can either "pull a mussel" (find a shellfish to be your dance partner) or "pull a muscle" (hurt yourself through overly vigrous dancing.)
     

    quietdandelion

    Banned
    Formosa/Chinese
    Quiet one, you are clearly reading some book that has jokes built around plays on words, or puns, or double meanings.

    Since "mussel" (a shellfish) and "muscle" (as in the human body) are pronouned identically, and since "pulled" can mean wrench a part of the body uncomfortably, or find a partner at a disco, the joke here is built around the absurd concept of a "seafood disco" where you can either "pull a mussel" (find a shellfish to be your dance partner) or "pull a muscle" (hurt yourself through overly vigrous dancing.)
    Thanks, GreenWhiteBlue, for the impressive analysis.
    Besides, I wonder if "pull a mussel" can mean litterally "raise a mussel and eat it" at a seafood disco.
     

    cirrus

    Senior Member
    UK English
    I doubt it somehow. It doesn't work for me at any rate. If you get a mussel from the beach you talking about picking them.
     

    bibliolept

    Senior Member
    AE, Español
    Cirrus, you would naturally say: "I went to the disco and pulled a muscle."
    If it's a "seafood disco," then you might joke that you "pulled a mussel." The "humor" can revolve around just the one word, not the entire phrase.
     

    cirrus

    Senior Member
    UK English
    Being a native speaker, I got that. The question I was answering was whether you could use pull a mussel for collecting them.
     
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