punakynä

Gavril

Senior Member
English, USA
Some excerpts from a building inspection report:


1.
Urakoitsija toimittaa aineiston [...] valvojan tarkistettavaksi (mukaan lukien urakoitsijan punakynät)

"The contractor will submit the material [...] for the supervisor to review (including the contractor's [???])"

2.
Kiinteistöhuollon mappien toimitus ja tarkastus (sis. puhtaaksi piirretyt punakynät)

"Submission and inspection of property-maintenance binders (including [???])"


"punakynä" clearly doesn't refer to a literal red pen/pencil/etc. in these contexts – so what is it, then?

And what does "puhtaaksi piirretty" mean when describing it?

(I have some sense of what the answer to these might be, but I'd like to get a straightforward definition from a native/fluent speaker.)

Thanks for your time,
Gavril
 
  • Kristoffer71

    New Member
    Swedish
    Punakynä here seems to refer to notes and or drawings made about changes which need to be made. Puhtaaksi piirretty, would mean that one has taken those notes/drawings and have rewritten/ redrawn them so that it looks clear and readable.

    Punakynä as a word comes from the old practice of using a red pen when correcting somebody's text, but is here used in a more symbolic sense.
     

    Maunulan Pappa

    Member
    Finnish
    Puhtaaksi piirtäminen tarkoittaa tosiaan sitä, että piirroksen aikaisempi versio tai luonnos piirretään uudelleen niin, että siihen tarvittavat muutokset ja korjaukset (jotka on tosiaan voitu merkitä punakynällä) otetaan huomioon. Vastaavasti luonnosteksti tai nopeasti tehdyt muistiinpanot voidaan kirjoittaa puhtaaksi.

    Noissa Gavrilin alkuperäisissä esimerkeissä sanaa "punakynät" on käytetty hyvin epämuodollisesti. Kyseessä on selvästikin alan ammattilaisten keskenään käyttämä jargoni.
     
    Last edited:

    Gavril

    Senior Member
    English, USA
    Thanks for the responses!

    So far, the evidence I've found (here and elsewhere) suggests that "punakynä(t)" refers to revisions of some sort.

    Any further details would be welcome.

    By the way:


    The bilingual text in that paper implies that the author is using "as-built drawing" as the English equivalent of "punakynä".

    So, how did you infer that "punakynät" refers to potential changes?

    To be clear, I think you're more likely to be correct – "as-built drawing" might be an acceptable translation within the specific context of that paper, but I don't think it's a general solution for this use of "punakynä". I'm just wondering how you arrived at your conclusion.
     
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    Maunulan Pappa

    Member
    Finnish
    Following a quick Google search, it seems that "punakynät" is used for drawings illustrating ad-hoc changes made to the "official" drawings. In the repair construction scene, changes are more or less unavoidable. And it is of course desirable to update the drawings (piirtää puhtaaksi) so that the documentation corresponds with the reality; if not, the next repair would be that much more difficult.

    It appears that the term is being used at least in the areas of electrical installations and fire blocks. I admit that this usage was news to me!
     
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