puncture/pierce

Gabriel Malheiros

Senior Member
Portuguese - Brazil
Hello, guys

When you take a blood test and have your blood drawn, which verb should you use to describe the act of the doctor jabbing a needle into your arm?

"The doctor pierced my arm/vein with a needle to draw my blood"
or
"The doctor puncutured my arm/vein with a needle to draw my blood"

Which sentence is correct?
 
  • dojibear

    Senior Member
    English - Northeast US
    Both are correct, but both verbs are a bit strong for the situation.

    Often we just say "The doctor stuck a needle (or inserted a needle) in my arm / in my vein".
     

    sdgraham

    Senior Member
    USA English
    Both are "correct," but I don't think any AE speaker is likely to say either one.

    "The doctor drew some blood (from my arm) ," is all you need.
     
    Last edited:

    Uriel-

    Senior Member
    American English
    You pierce ears, you puncture tires, but people are squeamish enough about letting someone stick a needle in their arm that they try to avoid using such terms for that act. Usually blood is drawn (although behind your back the phlebo might say that you were a hard stick and she had to stick you twice to get anything out of you!)
     

    Gabriel Malheiros

    Senior Member
    Portuguese - Brazil
    Both are "correct," but I don't think any AE speaker is likely to say either one.

    "The doctor drew some blood (from my arm) ," is all you need.
    Yes, technically a phlebotomist, but to most folks a medical technician.
    I agree with sd. It is also very common to hear that a medical professional (rarely a doctor, I'll point out - usually a phlebotomist) "took" blood.
    You pierce ears, you puncture tires, but people are squeamish enough about letting someone stick a needle in their arm that they try to avoid using such terms for that act. Usually blood is drawn (although behind your back the phlebo might say that you were a hard stick and she had to stick you twice to get anything out of you!)


    What if I mean the doctor/nurse drawing my blood wasn't able to find any good vein and ended up jabbing all over my arm with needles. How could I say that? Could I use any of these following sentences?

    "The nurse/doctor got/had my arm/me filled with holes /punctures"

    "The nurse got/had me/my arm all pierced/punctured"

    "I am/My arm is all punctured/pierced"

    thank you
     

    RedwoodGrove

    Senior Member
    English, USA
    What if I mean the doctor/nurse drawing my blood wasn't able to find any good vein and ended up jabbing all over my arm with needles. How could I say that? Could I use any of these following sentences?

    "The nurse/doctor got/had my arm/me filled with holes /punctures"

    "The nurse got/had me/my arm all pierced/punctured"

    "I am/My arm is all punctured/pierced"

    thank you
    You would then not be speaking technically and would be able to use whatever informal speech you wanted. You have to figure out which linguistic register you are trying to achieve.
     

    Gabriel Malheiros

    Senior Member
    Portuguese - Brazil
    You would then not be speaking technically and would be able to use whatever informal speech you wanted. You have to figure out which linguistic register you are trying to achieve.
    but , of these sentences I suggested, which one is correct?


    "The nurse/doctor got/had my arm/me filled with holes /punctures"

    "The nurse got/had me/my arm all pierced/punctured"

    "I am/My arm is all punctured/pierced"
     

    Florentia52

    Modwoman in the attic
    English - United States
    "The nurse/doctor got/had my arm/me filled with holes /punctures"

    "The nurse got/had me/my arm all pierced/punctured"

    "I am/My arm is all punctured/pierced"
    You're adding too many different questions to a discussion about whether "pierced" or "punctured" is better used to describe what is done with a needle when drawing blood, Gabriel. Your new questions include literally dozens of different permutations.

    You have already been advised of the words most native speakers would use, and that you can use either "pierced" or "punctured" if you wish to speak informally.

    If you have questions about other words or other ways to phrase your sentences, please start a new thread.
     

    Uriel-

    Senior Member
    American English
    In response to your vocabulary question, we would probably use some version of to stick, and not punctured or pierced. "The nurse had to stick me a bunch of times, and now I'm all bruised up!"

    I know pierce and puncture both mean to stick something sharp into something, and you really want to use one of them here, but we just don't use either word much in this particular context.
     

    Gabriel Malheiros

    Senior Member
    Portuguese - Brazil
    You said it well here. "...couldn't find a vein and ended up jabbing me all over (sticking my arm over and over)..."
    You're adding too many different questions to a discussion about whether "pierced" or "punctured" is better used to describe what is done with a needle when drawing blood, Gabriel. Your new questions include literally dozens of different permutations.

    You have already been advised of the words most native speakers would use, and that you can use either "pierced" or "punctured" if you wish to speak informally.

    If you have questions about other words or other ways to phrase your sentences, please start a new thread.
    In response to your vocabulary question, we would probably use some version of to stick, and not punctured or pierced. "The nurse had to stick me a bunch of times, and now I'm all bruised up!"

    I know pierce and puncture both mean to stick something sharp into something, and you really want to use one of them here, but we just don't use either word much in this particular context.

    Ok, but can I use the verb "get" or "have". Like:

    "The nurse got me all bruised up/pierced(If this latter didn't sound odd")
     

    spilorrific

    Senior Member
    English - US
    Yes, bruised. You could even go so far as to say something like "She/He stuck me so many times trying to find a decent vein that now I'm all bruised."
    A tip:
     
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