Punjabi: ਡਿੱਠਾ/ڈٹھا

panjabigator

Senior Member
Am. English
Greetings:

Have you ever heard <diṭhā> in Western Punjabi as a past tense for <dekhṇā>? I haven't heard it in Indian Punjabi, however you can find it in Sikh literature.

Cheers,
PG
 
  • Koozagar

    Senior Member
    Urdu
    The word that I know that is used is 'disda'
    "disda nahin tenu?"
    'dikh' is also used in 'our parts'. "dikhda nahin taynu? tayan nal chal"
     

    Qureshpor

    Senior Member
    Panjabi, Urdu پنجابی، اردو
    Yes, I have heard "diThaa" for the Urdu "dekhaa". Interestingly, there are a group of Punjabi words which have a link with Persian! Well, we should not be surprised because of the Indo-European language connection.

    puTh = pusht (back)
    kuTh = kusht ( kukRii kuThii e.. [I have] killed a chicken)
    muTh= musht = fistful
    guTh= gosh (corner)

    I think there are one or two more but I can not remember them for the moment.
     

    panjabigator

    Senior Member
    Am. English
    Yes, I have heard "diThaa" for the Urdu "dekhaa". Interestingly, there are a group of Punjabi words which have a link with Persian! Well, we should not be surprised because of the Indo-European language connection.

    puTh = pusht (back)
    kuTh = kusht ( kukRii kuThii e.. [I have] killed a chicken)
    muTh= musht = fistful
    guTh= gosh (corner)

    I think there are one or two more but I can not remember them for the moment.

    Qureshpor, thank you for drawing a comparison between Persian and Punjabi here. Very interesting.

    Where have you heard ڈٹھا? Is it mainly used by the older generations or is it quite common?
     

    Qureshpor

    Senior Member
    Panjabi, Urdu پنجابی، اردو
    Qureshpor, thank you for drawing a comparison between Persian and Punjabi here. Very interesting.

    Where have you heard ڈٹھا? Is it mainly used by the older generations or is it quite common?

    Very Briefly...

    disNRaa= dikhaa'ii denaa (Hindi: dikhnaa)

    dekhNRaa/vekhNRaa = dekhnaa

    DiThaa (I think) is used as a past participle only not as a simple past tense (preterite) where dekhiyaa/vekhiyaa would be used.

    My maternal side of the family use "DiTThaa", e.g.

    maiN os bande nuuN tad DiTThaa aahaa* jad...

    I had seen that person when..

    * aahaa = sii= thaa

    I think its use is already (almost) a thing of the past.
     

    Qureshpor

    Senior Member
    Panjabi, Urdu پنجابی، اردو
    Right, we use the former in my house too.

    Thanks for the info on "ditha," again. Very interesting.

    پڑھی نماز تے نیاز نہ سِکھیا
    تیریاں کِس کَم پڑھیاں نمازاں
    علم پڑھیا تے عمل نہ کیتا
    تیریاں کِس کَم کیتیاں وعظاں
    نہ کَہر ڈِٹَھا نہ کَہر والا ڈِٹَھا
    تیریاں کِس کَم دِتیاں نیازاں
    بُلھے شاہ پتہ تَد لگ سی
    جدوں چِڑی پَھسی ہتھ بازاں

    paRhii namaaz te niyaaz nah sikhiyaa
    teriyaaN kis kam paRhiyaaN namaazaaN
    'ilm paRhiyaa te 'amal nah kiitaa
    teriyaaN kis kam kiitiyaaN va'zaaN
    nah k_har DiTThaa nah k_har vaalaa DiTThaa
    teriyaaN kis kam dittiyaaN niyaazaaN
    Bullhe Shah patah tad lagsii
    jadoN chiRii phasii hath baazaaN

    niyaaz = humility + offering, va'z =preaching, baaz = falcon
    k_har =ghar= house...I think DiTThaa here implies "pahchaanaa"

    Please note also the future tense "lagsii"
     
    Last edited:

    Qureshpor

    Senior Member
    Panjabi, Urdu پنجابی، اردو
    Has anyone ever heard the word "diida" (not the Persian word for "eye" or the past participle of "diidan") connected with "seeing" in Punjabi? It is uttered with a tone.

     

    panjabigator

    Senior Member
    Am. English
    Could you provide a sentence, Qureshpor?

    Also, very grateful for the poem above. I'm always متوجہ towards the "sigmatic future" in Punjabi :)
     
    Last edited:

    Qureshpor

    Senior Member
    Panjabi, Urdu پنجابی، اردو
    جویں؟ زرا مثال وی دسو جی۔

    PG Jii. I have been hesitating to post an example incorporating this word because I have not been a witness to its usage. A good many yeas ago, a close friend of mine who happens to be a very learned gentleman*, related to me a court interpreting scenario. A man who hailed from Azad Kashmir had as his interpreter a Sikh gentleman. Needless to say, the two registers of the Punjabi language employed by the interpreter and his client were poles apart. During the questioning of the Kashmiri gentleman, the lawer asked him:

    When you were stabbed with a knife, did you see the man who stabbed you?

    This was interpreted as:

    jis vele tainuuN kachchuu vajjiyaa sii os vele tuuN os bande nuuN diidaa sii?

    Please note that "kachchuu = chakkuu=chaaquu. Also, I would like to add that I might not have got the actual sentence totally accurately as it has been a long time. The important part is the word "diidaa"

    *He is learned in Punjabi, Urdu, Persian, Arabic and English. He has composed poetry in Urdu as well as translating selections from the Persian works of 'Allama Iqbal into "manzuum Urdu". He has translated Professor Ralph Russell's "In Pursuit of Urdu Literature" into Urdu. His name is Muhammad Sarwar Rijaa.
     

    panjabigator

    Senior Member
    Am. English
    Please note that "kachchuu = chakkuu=chaaquu.

    Common example of metathesis. I've seen it before in the words کیچھڑ and چھیکڑ.

    I've never seen 'dīdā' before. Was the Sikh also from AK? I'll be in Punjab soon, so I'll research this.
     

    Qureshpor

    Senior Member
    Panjabi, Urdu پنجابی، اردو
    Common example of metathesis. I've seen it before in the words کیچھڑ and چھیکڑ.

    I've never seen 'dīdā' before. Was the Sikh also from AK? I'll be in Punjab soon, so I'll research this.

    You don't mean Urdu/Hindi "kiichaR" vs Punjabi "chikkaR", do you?

    No, the gentleman was not from AK. If he were, there would not have been "lost in translation" issues!
     

    marrish

    Senior Member
    اُردو Urdu
    Has anyone ever heard the word "diida" (not the Persian word for "eye" or the past participle of "diidan") connected with "seeing" in Punjabi? It is uttered with a tone.

    This is used in the meaning of an eye in Haryanvi
     

    Qureshpor

    Senior Member
    Panjabi, Urdu پنجابی، اردو
    I've heard it in in the sentence "oye tainuuN diihNdaa nahiiN." Rising tone. Is this what you meant?


    Yes! But, as far as I remember, without the nasalisation. So, your sentence would mean, "Oye, Can't you see?" or "Oye, are you blind or something?!"
     
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