Punjabi: ਸਾਰੇ ਸਬਜ਼ / سارے سبز

MonsieurGonzalito

Senior Member
Castellano de Argentina
Friends,

I have trouble translating saare sabaz in the context of the following verse.

e ve saare sabaz dii jugnii jii !

(It is given as the last of many praises or epithets to the Jugni, some spiritual being)

Translations puts it as "long lived". In the dictionary sabaz, gives the idea of green, verdant.
But in Urdu, as a masculine noun, apparently also means "beloved, sweetheart"

What is the best translation in this case?
This is the evergreen? / thoroughly beloved? / long-lived? of the Jugni?

Thanks in advance
 
  • marrish

    Senior Member
    اُردو Urdu
    It's simply the case of wrong text, that's why you can't get the meaning right. The text doesn't quite make sense to me. Where did get it from?
     

    Alfaaz

    Senior Member
    English
    MonsieurGonzalito said:
    I have trouble translating saare sabaz in the context of the following verse.

    e ve saare sabaz dii jugnii jii !
    Note: It is سرسبز - sar-sabz (as written in the subtitles of the video), not سارے سبز.
     

    MonsieurGonzalito

    Senior Member
    Castellano de Argentina
    Urdu too.
    It could also be famous, victorious.
    In the context of the verse, ascendant is what I like better.
     
    Last edited:

    marrish

    Senior Member
    اُردو Urdu
    The verse comes from the song starting with the words "alif allah chambe dii buuTii" "الف اللہ چنبے دی بوٹی" AKA "jugNRii" "جگݨی", sung by Arif Lohar for Coke Studio Pakistan.

    A translation in the subtitles of the video is available along with the original text.

    "long-lived" and "ever-green" are good words, as can be seen in the translation.

    This is the evergreen? / thoroughly beloved? / long-lived? of the Jugni?
    I don't know for certain by what your comprehension of this verse is impeded, I can't know for sure,

    éh væ sar~sabz dii jugNRii jii
    ایہہ وے سرسبز دی جُگݨی جی


    but I take it to be the lack of experience with basic grammar which turns all on its head.

    dii jugNRii jii "the (respected) Jugni of"

    but it doesn't and can't mean "of the Jugni" — ("juggNRii jii dii/daa").
     

    MonsieurGonzalito

    Senior Member
    Castellano de Argentina
    Thanks, @marrish

    dii jugNRii jii "the (respected) Jugni of"

    While your correction stands (because Jugni-Ji is grammatically feminine, and al the persons potentially possessing are masculine), I believe a more accurate translation would be:

    the Jugni of the respected one

    (or whatever of the many alternatives to "respected" discussed) referring implicitly the Pir, the Prophet, or former Sufi masters.
    In surrounding verses, it is often "the Jugni of [someone]"
     

    MonsieurGonzalito

    Senior Member
    Castellano de Argentina
    Sorry, (respected) is the "jii".

    the Jugni of the ascendant/long-lived/evergreen one

    (I believe that, perhaps, the "jii" is for tradition and metrics only, the lyrics speak about the Jugni stumbling, falling into the hard floor and crying helplessly, it doesn't command a lot of respect).
     

    MonsieurGonzalito

    Senior Member
    Castellano de Argentina
    Further to that, it is important to know whose epithet it is ۰ سرسبز پیر
    Khidr - Wikipedia
    Thank you, @marrish, I didn't have this context.

    (to be precise, I do vaguely remember a Muslim story about Moses and some guide, asking him to do apparently evil/irrational things, but I didn't relate him with "the evergreen", nor did I know he was reputed to be immortal).
     
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