Punjabi: "gallṇā" and "rijjhṇā"

panjabigator

Senior Member
Am. English
Greetings everyone,

We use "gallṇā" in my family's Punjabi to inquire if food is thoroughly cooked or not, but I learned that this is not "correct" in (Eastern) Punjabi. Instead, I was taught that "gallṇā" should be used for food that has spoiled. "rijjhṇā" (ਰਿੱਝਣਾ) would be the "proper" word and "gallṇā" (ਗੱਲਣਾ) would just be a Hindi/Urdu import.

What are your thoughts about this?

Best wishes,
PG
 
  • Qureshpor

    Senior Member
    Panjabi, Urdu پنجابی، اردو
    Greetings everyone,

    We use "gallṇā" in my family's Punjabi to inquire if food is thoroughly cooked or not, but I learned that this is not "correct" in (Eastern) Punjabi. Instead, I was taught that "gallṇā" should be used for food that has spoiled. "rijjhṇā" (ਰਿੱਝਣਾ) would be the "proper" word and "gallṇā" (ਗੱਲਣਾ) would just be a Hindi/Urdu import.

    What are your thoughts about this?

    Best wishes,
    PG

    I am not certain if the so called correct meaning (spoilt/rotten) is TheTh Punjabi. I would say this is Urdu/Hindi influence but I would n't put my head on the block.

    For us (to use Faylasoof's phraseology), both rijjhNRaa and pakaaNRaa mean the same thing. Another alternative for the former is rinNRaa.

    "rinNRaa-pakaaNRaa vii te ko'ii ko'ii jaaNRdaa e" (Anwar Mas3uud- aj ke pakaa'iye!)
     

    panjabigator

    Senior Member
    Am. English
    How would you use "gallṇā" in ṭheṭh Punjabi?

    Wouldn't rijjhṇā be the transitive (pakkṇā) and "rinnṇā" (pakauṇā) be the intransitive?
     

    Alfaaz

    Senior Member
    English
    panjabigator said:
    "rijjhṇā" (ਰਿੱਝਣਾ) would be the "proper" word and "gallṇā" (ਗੱਲਣਾ) would just be a Hindi/Urdu import.
    QURESHPOR said:
    For us (to use Faylasoof's phraseology), both rijjhNRaa and pakaaNRaa mean the same thing. Another alternative for the former is rinNRaa.
    Interesting thread! I thought the words were used with different things (or maybe this is just a case of faulty observation/lack of adequate exposure):
    gosht galgaye ae...nihaari rijj reyi ae....chaa riNR reyi ae....lassi riRk diti ae...seviyaaN kaR reyaaN ne...khaaNRa bas pakka hi samjho...bas taaDa/tuaDa hi intizaar ae!
     

    Qureshpor

    Senior Member
    Panjabi, Urdu پنجابی، اردو
    How would you use "gallṇā" in ṭheṭh Punjabi?

    Wouldn't rijjhṇā be the transitive (pakkṇā) and "rinnṇā" (pakauṇā) be the intransitive?

    I believe you are correct in your assertion.

    By the way, I saw the word "riddaa" (cooked) in a Punjabi dictionary. I presume, this is equivalent to "rijjhiyaa", would you agree?

    As I am typing away, another word came to mind which I have n't heard/used for ages.

    "aj ke chaaRhiyaa e?" What's been cooked today?

    Now this "chaaRhnaa" is the same as the Urdu/Hindi verb "chaRhaanaa". The implication is.."chuulhe par kyaa chaRhaayaa gayaa hai?" (What has been put into the pot that is on the cooker?)
     

    Qureshpor

    Senior Member
    Panjabi, Urdu پنجابی، اردو
    Interesting thread! I thought the words were used with different things (or maybe this is just a case of faulty observation/lack of adequate exposure):
    gosht galgaye ae...nihaari rijj reyi ae....chaa riNR reyi ae....lassi riRk diti ae...seviyaaN kaR reyaaN ne...khaaNRa bas pakka hi samjho...bas taaDa/tuaDa hi intizaar ae!

    I have never heard this verb used with tea preparation! ​(gosht gall gayaa e..khaaNRaa bas pakkiyaa (h)ii samjho)
     

    panjabigator

    Senior Member
    Am. English
    QP Sahib,

    Thanks for this post. Yes, I would say "riddā" ਰਿੱਧਾ and ਰਿਝਿਅਾ are the same word. Good to know.

    ਚਾੜ੍ਹਿਅਾ is indeed a great word and I heard this in India quite a bit. This is also a useful transitive/causative construction that I often important to Hindi/Urdu when I'm careless. And we all know how careless I can be!

    I imagine that this next one isn't used outside Sikh families, but we also say ਅੱਜ ਕਿੰਨੇ ਪਰਸ਼ਾਦੇ ਛੱਕਣੇ in my house so that my mother makes an adequate amount of chapatis. During langar, sevādārs never call chapātiyāN anything but parshāde/prashāde.

    Now, are ਰਿੰਨਣਾ and ਪੱਕਣਾ exact cognates? I always felt like the former was more for "to simmer." Also, I assume that everyone here can read Gurumukhi, so please let me know if I need to transliterate.
     
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    Qureshpor

    Senior Member
    Panjabi, Urdu پنجابی، اردو
    QP Sahib,

    I imagine that this next one isn't used outside Sikh families, but we also say ਅੱਜ ਕਿੱਨੇ ਪਰਸ਼ਾਦੇ ਛੱਕਣੇ in my house so that my mother makes an adequate amount of chapatis. During langar, sevādārs never call chapātiyāN anything but parshāde/prashāde.

    Now, are ਰਿੱਨਣਾ and ਪੱਕਣਾ exact cognates? I always felt like the former was more for "to simmer." Also, I assume that everyone here can read Gurumukhi, so please let me know if I need to transliterate.

    I don't believe rinnNRaa means to simmer. I would say both are identical in meaning, hence "rinnNRaa-pakaaNRaa vii te ko'ii ko'ii jaaNRdaa e!"

    The ABC of my profession is "Assume nothing, Believe no one and Challenge everything!"
     
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