Punjabi: Kangna tera nee

Maharaj

Senior Member
Bundeli, Hindi, Urdu, Marathi
Hi,

Kya aap is popular Punjabi song ki ye dou linein Hindi me likh kar unka arth bata sakte hain?

Addiyan ton ki paiyan jhanjara laung mare lishkare
Kagna tera ni sanu kare ishaare
 
  • marrish

    Senior Member
    اُردو Urdu
    What about this?

    Punjabi:
    اَڈّیاں دھو کے پائیاں جھانجراں لونگ مارے لشکارے
    کنگنا تیرا نی سانوں کرے اشارے

    ਅੱਡਿਆਂ ਧੋ ਕੇ ਪਾਈਆਂ ਝਾਂਜਰਾਂ ਲੌਂਗ ਮਾਰੇ ਲਿਸ਼ਕਾਰੇ
    ਕੰਗਣਾ ਤੇਰਾ ਨੀ ਸਾਨੂੰ ਕਰੇ ਇਸ਼ਾਰੇ

    IPA:
    əɖɖɪãː t̪o˨ː keː pɑːɪɑ̃ː t͡ʃɑ̃ː˦d͡ʒrɑ̃ː lɔ̃ːg mɑːreː lɪʃkɑːreː
    kəŋɳɑː teːrɑː niː sɑːnũː kəreː ɪʃɑːreː


    Hindi:
    "एड़ियाँ" [=प्यारे प्यारे पैर] धो के पहन लिए पायल, लौंग मारता है "चमकारे"
    कंगन तेरा री हम को करता है इशारे

    eRiyaaN [=pyaare pyaare pair] dho ke pahan liye paayal, lauNg maartaa hai "chamkaare"
    kaNgan teraa rii ham ko kartaa hai ishaare
     
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    Dib

    Senior Member
    Bengali (India)
    @mundiya thanks but to be very precise in pronunciation I prefer it written in Hindi script.
    thanks @marrish could you plz do the same?

    Here's an attempt to reproduce marrish jii's IPA in a more or less Hindi orthography in Devanagari script:

    अड्डियाँ तो॒ के पाइयाँ चाँ॑जराँ, लौंग मारे लिश्कारे,
    कंगणा तेरा नी सानूँ करे इशारे

    As you see, I introduced two extra signs to represent the tones - a horizontal line at the bottom (तो॒) to express the low tone, and a vertical bar on top to express the high tone (चाँ॑जराँ) - this last one may not be very visible because of the unfortunate clash with the chandrabindu.

    However, @marrish jii, given the Punjabi spelling, shouldn't it be चाँ॒जराँ/t͡ʃɑ̃ː˨d͡ʒrɑ̃ː with a low tone? If it was a high tone, wouldn't the spelling be چانجهراں?
     
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    Maharaj

    Senior Member
    Bundeli, Hindi, Urdu, Marathi
    If you listen to the song the word 'kare' has been pronounced as कर-ए Could you tell me more about it.
    Also saanun = hum/humko/hamein and mainu = mujhe/mujhko ?
     

    marrish

    Senior Member
    اُردو Urdu
    ...given the Punjabi spelling, shouldn't it be चाँ॒जराँ/t͡ʃɑ̃ː˨d͡ʒrɑ̃ː with a low tone? If it was a high tone, wouldn't the spelling be چانجهراں?
    I agree too. I'm not familiar with these symbols. There's more, I'm not even sure how this tone (or the combination of two tones) should be described, low-rising, high-falling? The pronunciation is closer to جھانجھراں ਝਾਂਝਰਾਂ झाँझराँ- which is the spelling also found in the Dasam Granth - as if there were two tones at play.
    If you listen to the song the word 'kare' has been pronounced as कर-ए Could you tell me more about it.
    Also saanun = hum/humko/hamein and mainu = mujhe/mujhko ?
    It's only voice modulation in the song - kare is pronounced kare.

    saanuuN = hamko/hameN :tick: but not ham:cross:. ham = asiiN.
    mæNnuuN = mujhe/mujhko :tick:
     

    mundiya

    Senior Member
    Hindi, English, Punjabi
    The Punjabi ਝ झ is a tonal consonant, so not exactly a /cha/ or /jha/.
     
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    Au101

    Senior Member
    England, English (UK)
    thanks please confirm whether it's chanjra aur jhanjhra

    If you haven't already and you're serious about learning Punjabi you should take a bit of time to study the tonal system. It may be worth investing the effort to learn Gurmukhi, or Shahmukhi, script as well. A warning: Gurmukhi is very hard, especially if you're very comfortable with Devanagari. ਫ being pha, ਸ being sa and so on can really catch you out. Then there's remembering the difference between ਫ & ਢ; ਰ, ਹ & ਗ; ਸ & ਮ; ਭ, ਡ & ਤ and so on. Then there's the fun fact that ਦ is द but ਢ is ढ, in other words ਦ and ਢ aren't pairs ...

    Anyway...

    The five consonants ਘ घ gha, ਝ झ jha, ਢ ढ ḍha, ਧ ध dha and ਭ भ bha require special attention, for their pronunciation varies according to where they are in a word. These five consonants are, as you can tell by the transliteration, the Gurmukhi counterparts to those consonants which represent voiced aspirates in other North Indian scripts. However, Punjabi has lost the voiced aspirated stops from its phonemic inventory, with these sounds developing into the tones of modern Punjabi. As a result, these five letters are used in the representation of tones in Punjabi.

    When these consonants occur word-initially, they are pronounced as the corresponding voiceless, unaspirated stops, and the following vowel will be pronounced with a low tone. Thus, ਘੋੜਾ घोड़ा ghōṛā is pronounced /kòɽɑ/ कोड़ा (with a low tone on the first vowel) and ਭੈਣਾ भैणा bhaiṇā is pronounced /pɛ̀ɳɑ/ पैणा (with a low tone on the first vowel).

    In the middle of a word, they are pronounced as the corresponding voiced, unaspirated stops, and the following vowel will be pronounced with a low tone. Thus, ਪਘਾਰਨਾ पघारना paghārnā is pronounced /pəɡɑ̀rnɑ/ पगार्ना (with a low tone on the गा).

    At the end of a word (or, more specifically, at the end of a stem), they are pronounced as the corresponding voiced, unaspirated stops, and the preceding vowel will be pronounced with a high tone. Thus, ਕੁਝ कुझ kujh is pronounced /kʊ́d͡ʒ/ कुज (with a high tone on the vowel) and ਮਾਘ माघ māgh is pronounced /mɑ́ɡ/ माग (with a high tone on the vowel).

    Or at least that's the best I can work out from wikipedia, Omniglot and this book.

    It's quite important to understand these consonants as the developments of original voiced aspirates because ਘੋੜਾ and घोड़ा are the same word, it's just that in Hindi it's pronounced with a voiced aspirate घ still, whereas in Punjabi, this sound has evolved into a low tone, with the word-initial voicing lost. It's also important to understand the behaviour of these five in different environments, sometimes ਘ is pronounced क (with following low tone) and others ग (with following low tone or preceding high tone), if you try to think of ਘ as one or the other you will get lost, and if you try to forget about the underlying mechanics altogether and just learn the pronunciation of each word as it comes, you may miss relationships between words.
     
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