Punjabi: meraa thiiN gaiooN haal biimaaraaN

MonsieurGonzalito

Senior Member
Castellano de Argentina
This is the last verse of a song I asked about before, "UmraaN laghghiiaaN".
Punjabi: flying crows

It is about a female lover, increasingly upset because her beloved doesn't show up. She is "shooing crows" (which typically announce a guest), she is seeing all black, and she begs the rainclouds not to rain yet, so that her beloved is not delayed even longer.
It is a beautiful song, especially in the latest arranged rendition by Ali Sethi.


I don't understand the structure of the last verse


ਮੇਰਾ (ਥੀਣ / ਥੀ / ਥੀਂ ) ਗਇਓਂ ਹਾਲ ਬੀਮਾਰਾਂ
میرا تھیں (تھئی) گائیوں حال بیماراں​

merā (thiiṇ / thii / thiiNR) gaiōN haal biimaaraaN

I understand that the general idea of the verse is "because of my beloved departure I got sick", but I don't understand the exact structure of the sentence.
In particular:

  • Is it thii, thiiN or thiiNR?
  • Does thiiN by itself have an idiomatic value for "my beloved (my existence)" in Punjabi?
  • I know that "bimaar ho jaana" = "getting sick" exists in Punjabi, but "bimaar jaana" alone does not. Does the "thii" relate to honaa?
  • gaiōN is clearly a conjugated form of "jaaana", but what form exactly? It looks like a plural perfect participle, but it doesn't match the forms I know.
  • "biimaaraaN" is a masculine oblique adjective referring to a plural "hal"?

Please, I know this is poetry, but it has to make some grammatical sense. Trying to translate this verse is making ME sick now:(
Thanks in advance for any help.
 
  • marrish

    Senior Member
    اُردو Urdu
    I've already given an answer about "Is it thii, thiiN or thiiNR?" in another thread but my possibility is not even listed.
    Please, I know this is poetry, but it has to make some grammatical sense. Trying to translate this verse is making ME sick now:(
    Perhaps you don't realize that it's 12th century Punjabi.
     
    Last edited:

    MonsieurGonzalito

    Senior Member
    Castellano de Argentina
    I've already given an answer about "Is it thii, thiiN or thiiNR?" in another thread but my possibility is not even listed.

    but تھئی گیو or تھئی گیّو however I haven't yet listened to the song.

    Sorry, @marrish, I only now notice the hamza!

    What is th'ii?

    thiíin.png
    ?
     

    MonsieurGonzalito

    Senior Member
    Castellano de Argentina
    I was just suggested that gaioo can, in fact, be an archaism for giaa (ਗਿਆ / گیا), consistent with all those "aisō", "diyō", "pāyō" for masculine forms that we find in old Braj songs.

    Which, incidentally, is XII century alright as @marrish suggested.
     

    MonsieurGonzalito

    Senior Member
    Castellano de Argentina
    Someone found this video form me in Youtube, can't link to it, but the name is:

    Asad Amanat Ali Khan Live (Ghulam Farid, Mazhar Tirmazi)-Umran langhiyan pabhan(Urdu translation)

    It depicts a much younger Asad Amanat Ali Khan singing this song in a more traditional style.

    Each sentence has an Urdu translation.

    And for:

    میرا تھیں گئیوں حال بیماراں

    They translate

    میرا حال بیماروں جیسا ہو گیا

    which would mean, in my elementary Urdu, something like "My condition has become like (that of the) sick people".

    From which I assume that:

    بیماراں - ਬਿਮਾਰਾਂ - bimaaraaN = (masculine) the plural oblique of bimaaraa, a sick person
    حال - ਹਾਲ - haal = (masculine) direct singular: state situation
    میرا - ਮੇਰਾ - meraa = (masculine direct singular) my
    گئیوں - ਗਇਓਂ - gaiō = (some archaic masculine perfective past participle) has become
    تھیں - ??? - thiiN = still don't know, but combined with "gaiō" somehow results in some archaic way of saying "has become like"

    I guess it will have to suffice ...

    (BTW in this video transcription there is no hamza on تھیں)



     

    MonsieurGonzalito

    Senior Member
    Castellano de Argentina
    Last piece of the puzzle:

    thii (no nasalization) is from the Saraiki language, and equivalent to "ho gayaa" in Hindustani.
    The spelling seems to be simply تھی (ਥੀ)
    Gulam Farid, the Sufi scholar addressed in the song, was a polyglot and a celebrated Saraiki poet.
     

    marrish

    Senior Member
    اُردو Urdu
    میرا حال تو بیماروں کا سا ہو گیا
    . Sorry for misinformation about the dating, I had the impression the author was Baba Farid. Anyway, it's old and dialectal. When I typed تھئی, you misread it. It reads tha'ii. I wish you good luck with your future grammar studies.
     

    MonsieurGonzalito

    Senior Member
    Castellano de Argentina
    BTW, I want to thank again @littlepond , @marrish for their valuable input on this verse.
    I constantly bug members with old / poetic / slangy / dialectal / weird stuff, and they are very patient with me.
     
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