Punjabi: Rab Rakha

< Previous | Next >

panjabigator

Senior Member
Am. English
Greetings,

I was just told that Pakistani Panjabis also use <rab rakhkhā> amongst themselves as a departure phrase. Does anybody know more about this?

I have never heard <rab rakhkhā> used in serious conversation ever in Indian Panjabi.
 
  • bakshink

    Senior Member
    punjabi
    "Rab rakhkha" (May God take care of you) is very beautiful phrase and every Punjabi in India knows it,feels and will feel pleased to hear it. Though people may not be using it any more but they aren't using it any less either. It's used by the elders as the blessings to the departing young.
     

    Qureshpor

    Senior Member
    Panjabi, Urdu پنجابی، اردو
    Yes, I've heard rab raakha a lot here in PK; although I'm under the impression it is a bit old fashioned....
    Yes, I would agree. (Rab is of course of Arabic origins).

    Another typically Punjabi phrase for "Goodbye" is "Allah belii"

    And for emphasis, Allah belii Rab raakhaa!
     

    Qureshpor

    Senior Member
    Panjabi, Urdu پنجابی، اردو
    Good to know. Can you tell me more about "Allah belli"?
    The word "belii" means "guardian/helper/protector/friend/companion" etc. It is used in Punjabi as well as in Urdu. According to Farhang-i-'Aasifiyyah, the Punjabis (also) use "daataa velii" for "Allah belii". You must have come across the compound "yaar-belii".

    Here is a shi'r by Isma'iil Merathii

    phir des chhuuTaa guzrii so jhelii
    pardesiyoN kaa Allaah belii

    This word is of course not to be confused with a small "belaa" (land by the river bank/meadow)
     

    panjabigator

    Senior Member
    Am. English
    Thank you QP Sahib. We do use "belli" in my house, but I was hoping to know more about this phrase in relation to خدا حافض and the ever encroaching اللہ حافض. (We've discussed the latter two elsewhere, I do believe).
     

    Sheikh_14

    Senior Member
    English- United Kingdom, Urdu, Punjabi
    The word "belii" means "guardian/helper/protector/friend/companion" etc.
    Indeed Belli means pal/buddy in Punjabi, never knew it was used in Urdu as well, thank you for that. Btw isn't Rab Rakha also a Punjabi variant of May God bless you and easily usable in Urdu? Post 2 does suggest this. "It's used by the elders as the blessings to the departing young". The term is quite similar to both Allah Hafiz and the Pashto Da Khuda'e paa Amaan.
     

    littlepond

    Senior Member
    Hindi
    ^ I have heard both in Hindi (with long and short initial 'a'), mundiya jii. Maybe, the initial borrowing later on evolved according to speakers' speaking habits?
     

    mundiya

    Senior Member
    Hindi, English, Punjabi
    Are you suggesting that in Punjabi it is "rab-rakhaa" or have I misunderstood you?
    That's how I've heard it. But it could be dialectical/nonstandard. I can't speak for PG jii, but based on his transliteration in post 1, he seems to have heard it with a short /a/ too.
     

    Qureshpor

    Senior Member
    Panjabi, Urdu پنجابی، اردو
    Thank you. I have n't really taken too much notice of his transliteration. I thought he might have been a little careless (as also was bakshink Jii). I have never heard "rab rakhaa". I have heard of the name "rakkhaa singh" but not in the phrase "rabb raakhaa".
     

    Dib

    Senior Member
    Bengali (India)
    I can't speak for PG jii, but based on his transliteration in post 1, he seems to have heard it with a short /a/ too.
    Transliteration in post #5 seems to indicate the opposite. So, it's best to not attach any value to either in absence of further clarification.
     

    tarkshya

    Senior Member
    Marwari
    On a side note, my understanding is that "Khuda Hafiz" has pretty much disappeared from common speech in Pakistan. It has been replaced by "Allah Hafiz".
     

    ye jofte jurab

    New Member
    English (US)
    Personally mundiya, I like the way your version sounds better, but there are around ~10,000 results for "ਰੱਬ ਰਾਖਾ" and only ~8 for "ਰੱਬ ਰੱਖਾ." So that seems to settle it.

    Incidentally, Ramrakha (रामरखा) is a Khatri name of related meaning, with a short a.
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top