Punjabi: tar / تر / ਤਰ

MonsieurGonzalito

Senior Member
Castellano de Argentina
Friends,

in the song "Alif Allah Chambe di Booti", they are asking the Jugni to "eat in the (communal) platter" (in the sense of sharing his knowledge or grace, apparently).

jugnii, tar khaaiiN vic thaal!

what is the "tar" he is supposed to eat? Some sort of cucumber?
or to eat "rich/sodden/greasy (abundantly)"?
 
  • MonsieurGonzalito

    Senior Member
    Castellano de Argentina
    I got word from a Punjabi speaker that "tar" can be the imperative of some verb meaning "to put", whereas "khaiiN" is a plural word meaning "edibles".
    Therefore the sentence would translate as "put edibles in the platter!"

    Although I have no idea what the dictionary entries for any of those words would be, despite having searched for a long time :confused:.






     

    marrish

    Senior Member
    اُردو Urdu
    I got word from a Punjabi speaker that "tar" can be the imperative of some verb meaning "to put", whereas "khaiiN" is a plural word meaning "edibles".
    Therefore the sentence would translate as "put edibles in the platter!"

    Although I have no idea what the dictionary entries for any of those words would be, despite having searched for a long time :confused:.
    That would be دھر tàr.
     

    marrish

    Senior Member
    اُردو Urdu
    I answered your question which word would be the imperative of the verb 'to put', but hadn't listened to the song to check.

    You must have heard it? I use accented vowels in Punjabi transliteration/transcription to indicate the presence of tones.
    If you can hear دھر then the problem is solved.

    Have you established which verb it is and which form it is in this context?

    جگݨی دھر کھائِیں وچّ تھال
     

    MonsieurGonzalito

    Senior Member
    Castellano de Argentina
    I listened to the versions of Arif Lohar and Meesha Shafi in Coke Studio, and to the lighter Kanika Kapoor interpretation, which is more tongue-in-cheek and mixes with rap.
    To my untrained ears, they might very well be using a sounding, aspirated DhaDDa as you say.
    If that is true, then دھر is an imperative of دھرنڑا = put!

    Then کھائِیں is a separate word. If this were Urdu, I would say it is a past feminine participle, but this isn't.
    So I will assume it is what I was told, "the edibles". It has to be related to کھانڑا for sure, but it isn't an imperative, because we already have دھر.
     

    marrish

    Senior Member
    اُردو Urdu
    I'm not quite certain what aspirated DhaDDa is but we are talking about the same thing so there is no problem. I think you are talking about non-tonal realisation of words containing /h/ (thus pronouncing aspirated voiced stops with the loss of a tone).
    1. It is correct to say that the word is دھر, but, since you are not certain of the form and function of this and the subsequent word, it would be safer to say initially that دھر (tàr or t_har if you like) is the verbal stem. Perhaps there are other roles for a verbal stem to play.
    2. کھائِیں isn't Urdu, that's correct. We've already had a thread about this part of Punjabi grammar and I remember you arrived at correct conclusions (the word was پکائِیں).
     

    MonsieurGonzalito

    Senior Member
    Castellano de Argentina
    OK, I got it.

    the sentence is saying "put and eat in the platter", or, more literally, "having put, eat" or "after putting, eat" (kind of equivalent to "share")

    dhar is an absolutive of dharnaa. The verbal root alone is a valid absolutive.
    khaaiiN is the Punjabi informal imperative in -iiN form.
     

    marrish

    Senior Member
    اُردو Urdu
    Indeed! tàr can be seen as absolutive; treating it as an imperative would be OK too, because that would give two kinds of imperatives, the second one, کھائیں khaa'iiN being <future imperative>.

    As a closing note: تر tar means 'wet, moist' whereas دھر [tàr] <dhar> is the verbal stem of دھرنا 'put، place'.
     
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