puppy dogs' tails in leaps and bounds

riccardo

Member
Italy, Italian
Can you help me with these?

Context: father-daughter relationship. Quotation: “Yes, there had been sugar and spice and other sweet stuff that was nice, but there were slugs and snails and puppy dogs’ tails too.” Puppy dogs’ tails?! Any idea on what can that mean?

And, also. Context: Some Italian guy living in the UK has been a Blues fan for years. Quotation: “His dormant interest had been reawakened by the latterday influx of “my people” as he called them into the club. The suits, he said, had come on in leaps and bounds”. My questions: 1) “my people” are Italian football-players playing in the club?; 2) suits = goals?; 3) leaps and bounds = ?

Thanks a lot,

riccardo
 
  • Sharon

    Senior Member
    United States, English
    Puppy dogs' tails - It is from a nursery rhyme.

    SLUGS AND SNAILS

    What are little boys made of, made of?

    What are little boys made of?

    "Slugs and snails, and puppy-dogs' tails;

    That's what little boys are made of."

    What are little girls made of, made of ?

    What are little girls made of?

    "Sugar and spice, and everything nice;

    That's what little girls are made of."



    Without more context, the only thing I can tell you is that your quotation was taken from this rhyme. Reading the sentence, I would guess that the little girl was a "tomboy," meaning that she liked to play a little rougher than little girls are "supposed" to. Maybe she liked to play with frogs, or to climb trees in her frilly dresses, if she was willing to wear the frilly dresses at all.

    Hope that helps a bit!!
     

    Focalist

    Senior Member
    European Union, English
    riccardo said:
    Some Italian guy living in the UK has been a Blues fan for years. Quotation: “His dormant interest had been reawakened by the latterday influx of “my people” as he called them into the club. The suits, he said, had come on in leaps and bounds”. My questions: 1) “my people” are Italian football-players playing in the club?; 2) suits = goals?; 3) leaps and bounds = ?
    Concerning questions 1 and 2, the following has nothing to do with the speaker being Italian -- though I wonder is he talking about the Italian national football team (the Azzurri) or about one of several English teams also called "the Blues? My answers have to do with British "business-speak".

    In that jargon, "suits" means "managers, executives, etc.", i.e. the kind of people who wear suits to work (e.g. "the pub was full of suits: there must have been a management course going on somewhere near by"). Another piece of business-speak (and a horribly condescending one to my ear!) is for managers to call the lesser-paid employees whose work they direct: "my people" (e.g. "my people" aren't going to be very happy when they hear about the lay-offs).

    If your man was talking about the club as constituting the fans as well as the players, he could have been a top boss saying that his interest in the Blues had been reawakened by the fact that a lot of the people who worked for him had become members, and it was particularly noticeable how many management people were becoming involved.

    Sorry if that explanation is well wide of the goal!

    Q.3 is a lot easier to answer. "By leaps and bounds" means "very quickly", so "coming on in leaps and bounds" = "increasing very quickly, making very fast progress".

    F
     
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