Pusher

redAli

New Member
Italian
Hi,

I need your help about the word "pusher". I would like to know if this term has a unique meaning, with a very bad connotation, or if it can be used also broadly speaking, with a smoother connotation.
To be clearer, I'll make an example: "addicted" makes you think about drugs (=negative feelings), but it can be used also in a context different that drugs, for example: "my son is addicted to chocolate". So, can this apply to pusher as well? Could I say, in everyday language, that "my neighbor is my personal best-cakes-ever pusher"?
I'm interested above all to know what US people think abou that.

Thank you so much!
Alice
 
  • PaulQ

    Banned
    UK
    English - England
    The answer is "No" a pusher pushes unwanted or illegal items. "Pusher" is always negative. Also, you do not have a personal pusher, you have a personal dealer.
     

    JustKate

    Moderate Mod
    Pusher could be used jokingly, though. If I described my boss, who sometimes buys my department these fabulous chocolate truffles, as a "chocolate pusher," I don't think anybody who knows me and knows how much I love chocolate would think I was implying he was doing anything immoral or illegal. As far as I'm concerned, he can "push" those truffles as much as he wants.
     

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    Pusher could be used jokingly, though. If I described my boss, who sometimes buys my department these fabulous chocolate truffles, as a "chocolate pusher," I don't think anybody who knows me and knows how much I love chocolate would think I was implying he was doing anything immoral or illegal. As far as I'm concerned, he can "push" those truffles as much as he wants.
    To be amusing this is what I would have as a "pusher" http://thumbs.dreamstime.com/z/mother-father-walking-outdoors-pushing-baby-pram-portrait-smiling-34256574.jpg

    But seriously a "pusher" has to be offering for sale something you did not initially really want. He "pushes" it upon you (hoping you will become addicted). At which time I would suggest "dealer" would be a better term.
     
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