Put off vs. pay lip service vs. only satisfy verbally

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jokaec

Senior Member
Chinese - Hong Kong
John: Did Susan tell you she would do...?
Peter: Yes, she said OK.
John: I think she just "puts you off" or "pays lip service" or "satisfies you verbally". She will never do it.


Are they all correct in this situation? If so, which is the best? Thank you.
 
  • Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    "I think she just says that – she’ll never do it."

    I wouldn’t use any of your choices, and I would end your first sentence with "it."
     

    Florentia52

    Modwoman in the attic
    English - United States
    No, we wouldn't use any of those. For one thing, the present tense sounds very odd; we would use the present continuous. Secondly, there's no context to indicate that Susan is putting Peter off or just paying lip service to anything. John would probably say "I don't believe her" or "I doubt it."

    [I recommend not saying "satisfy someone verbally" in any context.]

    Cross-posted
     

    jokaec

    Senior Member
    Chinese - Hong Kong
    Thank you Copyright and Florentia52.
    Basically, are "putting Peter off" and "paying Peter lip service" the same? Suppose there is an indication to that, which one is better in this situation?
     

    Florentia52

    Modwoman in the attic
    English - United States
    Basically, are "putting Peter off" and "paying Peter lip service" the same? Suppose there is an indication to that, which one is better in this situation?
    No, they do not mean the same thing, so the context would determine which is more appropriate.
     
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