Put one more brick into

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danielxu85

Senior Member
Mandarin Chinese
I am having some trouble understanding the following sentence. According to dictionary, "drop a brick" means making a clumsy social error, but what about "putting a brick?" Is that also idiomatic? Many thanks!

That is why we are putting one more brick into the negotiations, and urge other developed countries to do the same.
 
  • Cagey

    post mod (English Only / Latin)
    English - US
    If you drop a brick, you make a notable mistake.

    If you "put in a brick", you are helping to build something. Bricks are substantial and sturdy, so when you put in a brick you are adding something really significant. "We" are contributing one more useful and significant thing to the negotiations. "We" hope other developing countries will co-operate and to the same.
     

    danielxu85

    Senior Member
    Mandarin Chinese
    Many thanks for the vivid explanation. I thought that a brick meant a minor effort. Now I know that putting in a brick is more than pitching in!!!
     

    Cagey

    post mod (English Only / Latin)
    English - US
    Yes, a brick is a square block of concrete or clay used for building. It is very heavy if it is dropped. It is very sturdy if you construct a building with it.

    (I think you already know this, but I'll put it in anyway: images.)
     
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