put through school

NotNow

Senior Member
English
How do you say, I put him through school? It means I paid his college tuition and all other expenses.

Thanks.
 
  • lukis421

    Senior Member
    Polish - Poland
    That doesn't imply paying for the school. I guess we would something like "Opłaciłem mu szkołę/naukę"
    I'd say it does, if you say 'posłałem go do prywatnej szkoły' - because in Poland you don't have to pay for school unless it's private, so you normally don't think about paying tuition fees.
     

    zaffy

    Senior Member
    Polish
    Sure, but "Posłałem go szkoły" is not the same as "Posłałem go do prywatnej szkoły", which indeed implies paying for his education. I might say "W przyszłym roku posyłam córkę rok wcześniej do szkoły" and I could mean a state-run school.
     

    NotNow

    Senior Member
    English
    To clarify my post, I have in mind a college or university in the U.S., which is certainly not free.

    I apologize for the confusion.
     

    zaffy

    Senior Member
    Polish
    Yes, which is perfectly expressed by 'opłaciłem'

    For example, "Opłaciłem mu wyjazd" and "Zafundowałem my wyjazd" imply different things, don't they? Or is it just me? :)
     
    Last edited:

    zaffy

    Senior Member
    Polish
    'Opłacenie studiów' may just be the parental obligation or a sense of responsibility. 'Zafundowanie studiów, wyjazdu, samochodu' implies making a gift.
     

    Ben Jamin

    Senior Member
    Polish
    'Opłacenie studiów' may just be the parental obligation or a sense of responsibility. 'Zafundowanie studiów, wyjazdu, samochodu' implies making a gift.
    I think this is your individual personal interpretation. Most people will treat both verbs as equivalents.
     

    Piotr_WRF

    Senior Member
    Polish, German
    I see it as zaffy. For me there's clearly a nuance in meaning in so far that zafundować implies a gift, which opłacać does not.
     

    jasio

    Senior Member
    Why not "ufundowałem mu studia"? Or "Sfinansowałem jego studia" - which may be even better.

    To my ear "zafundować" is too coloquial for this context. Zafundować, to można lody albo wyjście do kina - then it sounds just right. "Ufundować" on the other hand, implies a sort of dignity or scale so to me it sounds better in this context - albeit it may imply a sort of a private scholarship or an award for achievements. But as far as I can recall, "sfinansować" is used most often in this context.
     

    Ben Jamin

    Senior Member
    Polish
    Why not "ufundowałem mu studia"? Or "Sfinansowałem jego studia" - which may be even better.

    To my ear "zafundować" is too coloquial for this context. Zafundować, to można lody albo wyjście do kina - then it sounds just right. "Ufundować" on the other hand, implies a sort of dignity or scale so to me it sounds better in this context - albeit it may imply a sort of a private scholarship or an award for achievements. But as far as I can recall, "sfinansować" is used most often in this context.
    I agree that "zafundowałem mu studia" is colloquial, but the context is not given, and that's why I don't understand why it should be "too colloquial"?
    "Ufundować", however, is a rather formal and elevated speech, used mostly about funding a university or library for public use.
    On the other hand I still don't understand why "opłaciłem" should have no connotation of a gift? I think it is quite opposite: "opłaciłem" implies an immediate connotation of a gift, unless anything is added that nullifies that connotation, for example "it was a loan, and I expect that he will pay it back".
     

    jasio

    Senior Member
    I agree that "zafundowałem mu studia" is colloquial, but the context is not given, and that's why I don't understand why it should be "too colloquial"?
    Doesn't it sound disrespectful? For me it does. For this reason it would never be my first choice unless a specific context justifies it.
    "Ufundować", however, is a rather formal and elevated speech, used mostly about funding a university or library for public use.
    It is elevated indeed. Yet I can imagine more contexts when it would be proper than in case of this slangish 'zafundować'.
    On the other hand I still don't understand why "opłaciłem" should have no connotation of a gift?
    Not my piece of cake in this case, but if the word can be used in various scenarios than this implied meaning does not seem to dominate.

    For me actually, it's quite opposite: with no further information I would assume existence of some sort of obligation. After all, if I pay for education of my son, it's my obligation as a parent, not a gift, isn't it? Similarly, in case of other persons, I would assume existence of a similar obligation, like responsibility of a family member, perhaps investment in a career of a good employee... A gift or a charity comes last to my mind.
     
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