Put up your hands / Put your hands up

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Dsimson

Senior Member
Good afternoon !
I'd like to be explained what the difference between :
Put up your hands
and
Put your hands up
is ??

I've heard the second expresion in (music) tracks whereas the first one is often used by my english teacher.
So what's the difference ?
I know we have to disconnect the proposition after the direct object (ex : I bring your cat back), don't we ?

Thanks in advance !
 
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  • Either is OK. There is no difference in meaning between the two expressions. But if the object is a pronoun, we should always place it between the verb and the adverb. For example, we say "look it up" rather than "look up it". Again if the object is a noun or noun phrase, either will do. Here actually we are talking about one kind of verb phrase consisting of a verb and an adverb. There is another kind of verb phrase consisting of a verb and a preposition, such as "look at", and "listent to" .In this kind of verb phrase, we never have the object following the verb closely, whether it is a noun or noun phrase or a pronoun. We always say "look at the flower" , "look at it" , "listen to their teacher attentively" and "listen to me".
     
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    JamesM

    Senior Member
    Although everything that ohmyrichard wrote makes sense, I certainly wouldn't expect to hear a bankrobber say, "Put up your hands!", nor would I expect to hear a mother say to a child while dressing the child, "It's time to slip your sweater on. Put up your hands for Mommy." I would expect "put your hands up" in both cases.

    "Put your hands up" sounds much more natural to me.

    Lyrics in general are not a good yardstick by which to measure typical conversational English.
     
    Although everything that ohmyrichard wrote makes sense, I certainly wouldn't expect to hear a bankrobber say, "Put up your hands!", nor would I expect to hear a mother say to a child while dressing the child, "It's time to slip your sweater on. Put up your hands for Mommy." I would expect "put your hands up" in both cases.

    "Put your hands up" sounds much more natural to me.

    Lyrics in general are not a good yardstick by which to measure typical conversational English.
    So, you mean if a robber said "Your money or your life? Put your hands up." to you, you would find it sweet to your ears? I was joking. Native speakers' linguistic intuition is what we non-native speakers can always rely on. Thanks for your explanation. I also have learned a lot from it.
     
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    HistofEng

    Senior Member
    USA Eng, Haitian-Creole
    But do American school teachers say"Hands up!" or "If you know the answer to my question, put up your hands." to their students in class?
    Thanks.
    "Hands up", yes, I hear that, but there is no verb in that.

    I would expect the teacher to say "put your hands up" since it is the most common. The other way sounds stilted.
     

    Dsimson

    Senior Member
    Thank you for all your replies, even if the grammar, explained in English, isn't easy to understand. But I'm on the English only forum :D

    I said it clearly : My English teacher always says "Put up your hands"
    So why does she that, if it's not seemed by you so natural ?

    For Matching Mole, I was precisely talking about that music !
     

    Nunty

    Senior Member
    Hebrew-US English (bilingual)
    I don't know why your teacher says that; could you find a nice way to ask her? When I was in school in the US, the expression was "raise your hands".
     

    ron1759

    Senior Member
    U.S. - English
    I (in the northeastern U.S.) think either one is fine, with "put up your hands" perhaps sounding slightly more natural and informal.

    As ohmyrichard noted, if a pronoun is used, then it would be "put them up" (NOT "put up them").

    I can see a teacher using either one with students.

    In the case of a robber speaking, I would say "Put up your hands!" At least that's what I remember from cartoons and grade-B westerns. (There's also "Put up your dukes!" as a solicitation to fight ["dukes" meaning "hands" in this expression]. I've never heard "Put your dukes up.")

    Ron
     

    born in newyork

    Senior Member
    U.S.A./English
    Dsimson: I think there may be two issues here. One is the placement of the preposition. As was pointed out, in this kind of construction, the preposition can go either after the object (if not a preposition) or after the verb. For example, you can say: "Take out the garbage." or "Take the garbage out." Both seem equally natural to me.

    The other issue is: what do teachers usually say to students in this situation? "Put up your hands" does sound slightly stilted to me (as HistofEng said) because usually teachers say "raise your hands." I'm not sure why "put your hands up" sounds slightly better to me -- but it's certainly not because phrases of this kind are necessarily better merely because the preposition is after the object.

    So, in my opinion, your teacher is gramatically correct but is not using the expression normally used in this situation.

    I hope this helps!
     

    gaer

    Senior Member
    US-English
    I don't know why your teacher says that; could you find a nice way to ask her? When I was in school in the US, the expression was "raise your hands".
    To the best of my knowledge, it is still: "raise your hands".

    To be honest, when I read either "put up your hands" or "put your hands up", I think of an old cowboy movie. :)
     

    ron1759

    Senior Member
    U.S. - English
    The other issue is: what do teachers usually say to students in this situation? "Put up your hands" does sound slightly stilted to me (as HistofEng said) because usually teachers say "raise your hands." I'm not sure why "put your hands up" sounds slightly better to me -- but it's certainly not because phrases of this kind are necessarily better merely because the preposition is after the object.

    So, in my opinion, your teacher is gramatically correct but is not using the expression normally used in this situation.
    Fair enough, but how about if the question is between "put down your hands" and "put your hands down"? I think even teachers who say "raise your hands" would choose one of those over "lower your hands"!

    Ron
     

    born in newyork

    Senior Member
    U.S.A./English
    I agree. I would say the common expression for this (at least in the US) is "put your hands down" -- though "put down your hands" also sounds fine to me.
     

    kalamazoo

    Senior Member
    US, English
    The teacher says to the class "Raise your hand if you know the answer." The cop arresting you says "Put your hands up or I'll shoot". The teacher wants you to raise one of your hands. The cop wants you to raise both of your hands. Both the teacher and the cop say "Okay, you can put your hands down now."
     

    kalamazoo

    Senior Member
    US, English
    You are certainly not stupid! But if you say to a single person "raise your hand" it means to raise one hand, but "raise your hands" means to put both up. If you address the class, if you are thinking of the students in the plural and you want each student to raise one hand if they know the answer, you might say "raise your hands" or if you are thinking of it as an instruction that you are giving to each student, you might say "raise your hand" In either case, it's unlikely that a given student will raise more than one of his hands. However in a dance club, if the vocalist exhorts the crowd to "raise your hands in the air" he probably means that each person should raise both their hands. Similarly, I think the teacher could say to the class "Open your book to page 36" or "Open your books to page 36" and it would mean exactly the same thing in either case.
     
    You are certainly not stupid! But if you say to a single person "raise your hand" it means to raise one hand, but "raise your hands" means to put both up. If you address the class, if you are thinking of the students in the plural and you want each student to raise one hand if they know the answer, you might say "raise your hands" or if you are thinking of it as an instruction that you are giving to each student, you might say "raise your hand" In either case, it's unlikely that a given student will raise more than one of his hands. However in a dance club, if the vocalist exhorts the crowd to "raise your hands in the air" he probably means that each person should raise both their hands. Similarly, I think the teacher could say to the class "Open your book to page 36" or "Open your books to page 36" and it would mean exactly the same thing in either case.
    Thanks, Kalamazoo. You have said something so helpful to non-native speaker teachers.
     

    Forero

    Senior Member
    I can imagine a bank robber saying any of these:

    Put your hands up.
    Get your hands up.
    Stick your hands up.
    Stick 'em up.

    But not any of these:

    Put up your hands.
    Get up your hands.
    Stick up your hands.

    It is not a matter of grammar but of stereotypes.
     

    ron1759

    Senior Member
    U.S. - English
    I can imagine a bank robber saying any of these:

    Put your hands up.
    Get your hands up.
    Stick your hands up.
    Stick 'em up.

    But not any of these:

    Put up your hands.
    Get up your hands.
    Stick up your hands.
    That's funny because for me it's just the opposite. I can hear a robber say "Put up your hands" (etc.) but not "Put your hands up" (etc.). There was a western movie called Put Up Your Hands! in 1919:

    imdb.com/title/tt0010602/

    I agree about "Stick 'em up," though. They may be the most classic "western robber" expression of all.
     

    HistofEng

    Senior Member
    USA Eng, Haitian-Creole
    I can imagine a bank robber saying any of these:

    Put your hands up.
    Get your hands up.
    Stick your hands up.
    Stick 'em up.

    But not any of these:

    Put up your hands.
    Get up your hands.
    Stick up your hands.

    It is not a matter of grammar but of stereotypes.
    I agree totally!
     
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