putting his hot dog down to become an ‘OJ expert,’

VicNicSor

Banned
Russian
This is how Tucker got on TV — he was heading back to his desk with a take-out hot dog one afternoon when he ran into the receptionist. She asked him whar he knows about the O.J. trial. Carlson asked why:
Well, she explained, Dan Rather’s booker just called looking for an O.J. expert to go on 48 Hours tonight. Everyone else is still at lunch. Can you do it?” He must’ve killed it because after putting his hot dog down to become an ‘OJ expert,’ Carlson was a regular on television.
Who Is Tucker Carlson? Narrated by Samm Levine, video

Does it mean he stopped eating his hot dog and moved on to the launch?
Thanks.
 
  • ewie

    Senior Member
    English English
    He was having his lunch: a hotdog.
    Someone asked him to be an expert on O. J. Simpson.
    He [metaphorically] put his hot dog down and became an expert on O. J. Simpson, as requested.

    I suppose one might call it a teeny-weeny joke, one not really designed to be funny.
     

    Trochfa

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    A drink pun based on O.J. Simpson's initials.

    1.
    He [metaphorically] put his hot dog down and became an expert on O. J. Simpson, as requested.
    :thumbsup:
    The "straight" meaning.

    2. He put his hotdog down and became an "OJ" expert. ("OJ" is an abbreviation for orange juice*.)
    The pun.

    The humour implies he put down one thing (the food) in order to take up another (the drink)

    * Orange juice
    In American English, the beverage name is often abbreviated as "OJ".
    Orange juice - Wikipedia
     
    Last edited:

    VicNicSor

    Banned
    Russian
    Sorry but what meanings of "put down" are used here to make a pun?

    The first is I guess to kill an ill/old dog.
    And what's the the other?:)
     

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    Sorry but what meanings of "put down" are used here to make a pun?

    The first is I guess to kill an ill/old dog.
    And what's the the other?:)
    No, he set it down on the table. He was in the middle of lunch (doing something mundane that had nothing to do with OJ - he wasn't studying OJ or following the news or anything like that), but he stopped eating and suddenly became an expert on OJ. He was the only "talking head" who was willing to interrupt his lunch so he was promoted to "OJ expert" with no other particular qualifications.
     

    heypresto

    Senior Member
    English - England
    The other is to put/set the hot dog aside. But this, as ewie explained, this is purely metaphorical.

    I don't think there are any puns involving euthanising a dog going on.
     

    Glasguensis

    Signal Modulation
    English - Scotland
    Put down is not part of the pun : the pun is based on OJ. It becomes possible because in both versions he places his food on the table.
     

    Trochfa

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    Having now seen the video I agree that, even though the narrator is a comedian, there is actually no intended pun in this instance.
     

    The pianist

    Senior Member
    English - US
    This is how Tucker got on TV — he was heading back to his desk with a take-out hot dog one afternoon when he ran into the receptionist. She asked him whar he knows about the O.J. trial. Carlson asked why:
    Well, she explained, Dan Rather’s booker just called looking for an O.J. expert to go on 48 Hours tonight. Everyone else is still at lunch. Can you do it?” He must’ve killed it because after putting his hot dog down to become an ‘OJ expert,’ Carlson was a regular on television.
    Who Is Tucker Carlson? Narrated by Samm Levine, video

    Does it mean he stopped eating his hot dog and moved on to the launch?
    Thanks.
    Everything here is literal:

    a) This is how he got on TV.

    b) Tucker Carlson set his hot dog down and worked on becoming a Simpson expert.

    c) He must have killed it, i.e. the presentation, which means 'he did a good job'. This led to a TV career.

    Your interpretation is correct. There are no puns here, and 'OJ' meaning orange juice is irrelevant and immaterial.
     

    kentix

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    I agree there's no pun. It's an observation on how shallow TV news can be. One minute he's a nobody with a hot dog in his hand (a very inexpensive lunch) and the next minute, just by saying yes, he becomes an O.J. Simpson expert. He puts down the hot dog (he probably finished it in real life), studies a bit of the news, goes on TV, and now he's famous (and probably not eating too many hot dogs).
     
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