quality silk material

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quietdandelion

Banned
Formosa/Chinese
This dress is made of quality silk material. It feels very soft and smooth.


"Quality silk material" sounds good to my ear, but it looks like a bad construction. Does it sound lame to you?
 
  • little_~liv

    New Member
    English, England
    hi! ... 'quality silk material' ... hmm let me see

    would you not say 'good quality silk', because seeing as silk is already a material .. the 'material part is not necessary and 'quality' isn't describing it unless you use 'good' or 'bad'.

    hope this helps
     

    quietdandelion

    Banned
    Formosa/Chinese
    Thanks, little.
    What if I make a little change to the wording "This dress is made of high quality of silk material," would it sound better? Do I have to omit either silk or material here?
     

    AngelEyes

    Senior Member
    English - United States
    Hi quietdandelion,

    This dress is made of exquisite silk material, constructed of/made from only the highest quality fibers. It feels very soft and smooth.


    I find it humorous that you use such a colloquial word like "lame" so easily, and yet you question your aptitude for the more common term "high quality." I admire your talent with the English language. :)

    Anyway, this is the way I'd write it. "High quality" works and is just fine, but you reinforce the essence of your second sentence with a more descriptive word like "exquisite."

    If you wanted to fluff it up even more, you could expand that second one, as well.
    To answer your question, your original sentence is fine, and I agree with the other suggestions, too.

    I should add that I'd use one or the other word combinations:
    1. constructed of
    2. made from

    Not both.

    AngelEyes
     

    quietdandelion

    Banned
    Formosa/Chinese
    Hi quietdandelion,

    This dress is made of exquisite silk material, constructed of/made from only the highest quality fibers. It feels very soft and smooth.


    I find it humorous that you use such a colloquial word like "lame" so easily, and yet you question your aptitude for the more common term "high quality." I admire your talent with the English language. :)

    Anyway, this is the way I'd write it. "High quality" works and is just fine, but you reinforce the essence of your second sentence with a more descriptive word like "exquisite."

    If you wanted to fluff it up even more, you could expand that second one, as well.
    To answer your question, your original sentence is fine, and I agree with the other suggestions, too.

    I should add that I'd use one or the other word combinations:
    1. constructed of
    2. made from

    Not both.

    AngelEyes
    Thanks again, AngelEyes.
    I think I should say "Good morning to you!"
    And you writes like a poet--a lot of them are over my head. I presume you'll make a renouned poet or writer of yourself one day.
    Would you be kind enough to cast a bit of light on the part I bolded?
     

    AngelEyes

    Senior Member
    English - United States
    First of all, thank you for those kind words. I'll remember them someday.

    you question your aptitude for the more common term "high quality."

    As for this, "aptitude" means "the ability to..." do something. You asked your question to make sure you understood the correct usage of "high quality." But then you used the word, "lame," with is very casual and not used THAT much by everybody in the US. Your subconscious use and ease in which it flowed out of you shows to me, at least, that you understand the language extremely well. I'm very impressed.

    May I ask:
    What's the use of your original sentence? I ask because my way is fancier and it's not necessary to be that grand in certain circumstances. If you were speaking those words, too, you probably wouldn't say it that way, either.

    But if you're writing it to create word pictures and set a mood, definitely "get dramatic" with the other words you use to write your sentence.

    Thanks again.:)


    AngelEyes
     

    quietdandelion

    Banned
    Formosa/Chinese
    As for this, "aptitude" means "the ability to..." do something. You asked your question to make sure you understood the correct usage of "high quality." Now, I get it. Yet I don't think I asked about the correct usage of "high quality," but I did ask about "quality silk material."
    May I ask:
    What's the use of your original sentence? That's a stand-alone test question made by what-you-may-call-it, and whenever there is anything wrong, I'd post it here to ask for help.
    Thanks again. :)


    AngelEyes
    No, it's I that should say "Thank you, again."
     

    AngelEyes

    Senior Member
    English - United States
    "High-quality silk material" would be the best way to say it, if you wanted to stick as close as possible to your original sentence.

    As you can see, there are lots of possiblities. The others are all good, I think.



    AngelEyes
     

    panjandrum

    Lapsed Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    This dress is made of quality silk material.

    A reflection on this sentence.
    It sounds good, but it also calls to mind similar sentences and their contexts. It sounds like an advertising statement, carefully made.

    What does quality mean?
    As others have pointed out you really should say what sort of quality. The sentence is relying on the reader assuming "high quality" or "best quality". But if someone bought the dress and complained that it was not made of good quality material - hey no one said that it was. This dress may be made of second quality material, or indeed poor quality.

    Then I get suspicious about "silk material".
    Why doesn't it just say "silk". We all know what silk is.
    I think this dress is made of a fabric that includes some silk, but is not pure silk, and probably has some other flaws.
     

    AngelEyes

    Senior Member
    English - United States
    Panj,

    There's a "crushed silk." And my closet is full of washable, 100% silk items.
    They're really soft, but they wrinkle easily, so they have to be ironed. (Big drawback.)

    Believe me, if you've got a cheap, ivory-colored silk blouse hanging next to a more expensive, exquisitely-made ivory silk blouse, you can see the difference without even touching them.

    quietdandelion has already mapped out the level of how nice the silk is by telling us it's "high-quality."

    I guess I'm not sure where you're coming from.

    AngelEyes
     

    quietdandelion

    Banned
    Formosa/Chinese
    This dress is made of quality silk material.

    A reflection on this sentence.
    It sounds good, but it also calls to mind similar sentences and their contexts. It sounds like an advertising statement, carefully made.

    What does quality mean?
    As others have pointed out you really should say what sort of quality. The sentence is relying on the reader assuming "high quality" or "best quality". But if someone bought the dress and complained that it was not made of good quality material - hey no one said that it was. This dress may be made of second quality material, or indeed poor quality.

    Then I get suspicious about "silk material".
    Why doesn't it just say "silk". We all know what silk is.
    I think this dress is made of a fabric that includes some silk, but is not pure silk, and probably has some other flaws.
    That's marvellous, awesome! Thank you, panj.
    It takes me a while to read this post of yours again and again, only to percieve parts of the meanings--this is deep and philosophical.
    If AngelEyes would make a great poet, then I'm convinced that you would become a great philosopher.
     

    liliput

    Senior Member
    U.K. English
    I agree.
    Silk is a material, therefore to say "silk material" is tautology (saying the same thing twice).
    Use "high quality silk".
    "It's soft and smooth to the touch" or "it feels soft and smooth against the skin" are more evocative and sensuous than "it feels soft and smooth".
     
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